Joyce Byrne to Receive the 2018 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement

OAEnglish

The National Media Awards Foundation (NMAF) is proud to present the 2018 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement to Joyce Byrne, publisher of Avenue Calgary at RedPoint Media & Marketing Solutions.

If you are passionate about Canadian publishing, you have met or worked with Joyce. Described as a “champion of magazines,” Joyce has an all-in approach to her work that makes her stand out.

“Joyce doesn’t look for easy,” notes Penny Caldwell, former editor and publisher of Cottage Life. “Since bursting onto the magazine publishing scene, she has consistently reached beyond her own sphere to help others.”

Just before launching her career in the early 2000s, Joyce took a publishing course with D. B. Scott at Ryerson University. There, she met Anicka Quin, who is now editorial director of Western Living and Vancouver magazines. Quin recalls the meeting: “[Joyce] was there with her wicked sense of humour, and she quickly stood out as one of the only ones there who was really ready to be a part of this industry.”

And ready, she was. During her tenure as publisher of This Magazine, from 2001 to 2005, the publication excelled on the business and editorial side.

This Magazine has only been nominated once in its 52-year history for Magazine of the Year at the National Magazine Awards and it was during Joyce’s time as publisher, a testament to her leadership and the excellent magazine it produced,” notes Lisa Whittington-Hill, Joyce’s successor and current publisher of This.

In 2005, Joyce left This Magazine in the capable hands of Whittington-Hill and moved to Edmonton, joining award-winning Venture Publishing as vice-president and associate publisher. There, she focused her work on Alberta Venture and unlimited magazines. In 2008, unlimited became the first Alberta-based magazine to win a National Magazine Award for Art Direction of an Entire Issue, a remarkable achievement for the team of the newly launched publication. During that time, Joyce also helped launch Eighteen Bridges, a literary magazine with an impressive collection of National Magazine Awards.

In 2014, Joyce moved some 300 kilometers south and became publisher of yet another celebrated magazine: Avenue Calgary. So brilliantly has she led the team of the award-winning lifestyle publication that her role was recently expanded to group publisher.

As a publisher, Joyce favors a collaborative approach.

“While she knows so much about the industry and magazines—from an encyclopedic knowledge of cover concepts published around the world to an up-to-the-minute grasp on the leading ideas about where the industry is going and how to improve sales—she is a great collaborator and listens to ideas and input from all levels of her staff,” affirms Käthe Lemon, editor-in-chief of Avenue Calgary.

“Of all the people I’ve worked for or with, I have rarely if ever had the opportunity to work with anyone more dedicated to the magazine publishing industry or who loves magazines more—indeed, I’m not sure such a person exists,” Lemon adds.

A quick glance at her career illuminates Joyce’s commitment to magazine publishing. Throughout the years, she has worked with magazines ranging in topics from trade, politics and literature to business and city life, and remains as passionate as ever about magazines. In addition to her role as publisher and her various pro bono commitments, Joyce still lends a hand as a proofreader for the semi-annual literary magazine Taddle Creek.

“Volunteering is something we’re all supposed to do, to give something back to our community and our industry,” observes veteran magazine writer David Hayes. “Most of us have the best intentions. Some of us manage one or two commitments around our busy lives. Joyce is a tireless volunteer for countless causes, mostly associated in some way with magazine publishing or writing, in addition to all her paid duties.”

To say that Joyce’s volunteer experience is impressive would be an understatement. She served as a director of Magazines Canada from 2002-2012, where she sat on the public affairs and small magazines committees, curriculum development task forces, and the professional development committee, which she chaired from 2007-2013. In addition, Joyce has served on program development committees for the Ontario Media Development Corporation, on the board of Word on the Street (Toronto)—where she helped develop the successful Canadian Magazines reading tent—and on the board of Edmonton’s Theatre Network. In 2008-2009, Joyce chaired the Advertising Club of Edmonton (ACE) Awards, and from 2010-2014, the Edmonton Cannes Reel Screening fundraiser for National Advertising Benevolent Society (NABS). In 2013, Joyce received the ACE Fellowship Award, and was also named to the NABS Honour Roll the previous year.

Joyce has also served as a director of the National Media Awards Foundation, including a two-year term as president, and still remains involved as a board member. An industry builder, she is currently president of the Alberta Magazine Publishers Association (AMPA) and a director of both the National Advertising Benevolent Society (Western Chapter) and the International Regional Magazine Association (IRMA).

Her efforts are noted and lauded by colleagues.

“I would be hard pressed to find a publishing professional more enthusiastic, engaged and knowledgeable about the magazine media industry than Joyce Byrne. She is a champion of the industry—its people, products and readers,” says Suzanne Trudel, executive director of the Alberta Magazine Publishers Association.

Earlier this year, AMPA recognized Joyce’s publishing expertise by awarding her its Achievement in Publishing Award.

For her dedication and enthusiasm for a stronger and more inclusive Canadian magazine industry, her tireless advocacy for service and volunteerism, and her inspiring leadership in magazine publishing, the National Media Awards Foundation is proud to honour Joyce Byrne, a self-proclaimed “magazine junkie,” with the 2018 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement.

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NOMINEES – 41st NATIONAL MAGAZINE AWARDS
Finalists for the 41st National Magazine Awards will be announced tomorrow, May 1, 2018 at 10am ET on www.magazine-awards.comblog.magazine-awards.com and on Twitter at @MagAwards. The 41st National Magazine Awards gala is set for June 1, 2018 at the Arcadian Court.  Join us to Celebrate Canadian Creators. Tickets will be on sale on Tuesday, May 1.

 

ABOUT THE OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
The NMAF’s most prestigious individual prize  is the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, an award that recognizes an individual’s innovation and creativity through contributions to the magazine industry. The award is open to circulation experts, editors, marketing, sales and promotion professionals, publishers, creators, designers, production managers – in short, to everyone in the industry. It cannot be given posthumously.

The Judging Committee of the National Media Awards Foundation considers the nominations, along with nominations from members of the Committee itself. The Board of the National Media Awards Foundation selects the winner. For more information and previous winners, visit magazine-awards.com/oa.

Photo of Joyce Byrne by Jared Sych.

Enter: 2018 NMAF Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement

2018 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement

The National Media Awards Foundation is calling for nominations for the 2018 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, presented annually to an individual whose creativity and innovation over the course of their career have made a significant impact on the Canadian magazine industry.

Previous winners include Penny Caldwell, Kim Pittaway, Kim JerniganMichael FoxStephen TrumperHeather RobertsonStephen OsborneJean ParéSally Armstrong, and more.

OA_winners
Nine former winners of the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement on stage at the 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards gala at the Arcadian Court, Toronto.

Nominations are welcome from anyone working in Canadian magazines, and must consist of:

  • A letter of nomination, including a brief bio of the nominee and a summary of their career achievements;
  • At least two (2) supporting letters from other individuals in the Canadian magazine industry or colleagues of the nominee.

There is no cost to nominate someone for the Outstanding Achievement Award.

Send your nomination’s package documents to staff to staff@magazine-awards.com by March 1, 2018.

The winner will be announced in April and they will be presented with their award on stage at the 41st National Magazine Awards gala.

For more information visit magazine-awards.com/oa

Penny Caldwell’s speech at the 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards

Penny Caldwell, publisher of Cottage Life, accepts the 2017 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement at the 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards gala in Toronto, 26 May 2017 (Photo by Steven Goetz / NMAF)

At last Friday’s 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards gala, the NMAF presented Penny Caldwell, publisher and vice-president of Cottage Life Media, with the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, the highest individual honour presented in Canadian magazines.

We asked Penny to compose a message to the industry, which was presented in the 40th anniversary NMA gala program and comprised the basis of her acceptance speech at the gala. Here are Penny Caldwell’s complete remarks.


The Space Between

Our urgent need for innovative ideas and talented creators
by Penny Caldwell

I am honoured to receive this award and extend my sincere thanks to the National Magazine Awards Foundation, to my colleagues who nominated me, and to the many people who have contacted me since the news was announced.

Recently, a student at Cottage Life asked me what I have learned over the nearly forty years that I have worked in publishing. The best advice, I told her, was to manage your expectations but keep dreaming, work hard, be patient, and be adaptable.

That advice came to me from Doug Creighton, the founding publisher of the Toronto Sun when, fresh out of university, I was looking for a job. A family friend had arranged the interview, and Doug said he could probably get me a job on the copy desk working the night shift. What a thrill to imagine being part of a big daily newspaper, even as a proofreader on the night shift. Then he advised me not to take the job. Go out, he said, and find a place at a small newspaper where you will learn to do everything. So I went home and applied to every community newspaper across Canada, and I got a job as a sports reporter and columnist at the Whitby News Advertiser in Ajax.

The newspaper’s editor and senior reporters taught me a lot about crafting compelling stories. When one of the girls on the basketball team was fatally attacked by another student, I even covered a murder. But I recall the day I heard some surprising news: that the purpose of the stories we poured our hearts into was to fill the space between the ads.

If only it were that simple.

Fast forward. Most of us here tonight are still inescapably seduced by the power of storytelling. And while we can’t lose sight of the reality that, yes, in our legacy business the stories have traditionally been what fill up the spaces between the ads, we comfort ourselves that good content comes out on top. Content is king. Our readers pay for the content. Our advertisers pay to be close to the content. How close? Well, that’s the million-dollar question, isn’t it?

Ads are no longer simply adjacent to content,. Now they pop up in the middle of the stories—online and on our TV screens. Not that this is new. Who here remembers the issue of Saturday Night magazine in the late ‘90s, in which an excerpt of Mordecai’s Richler’s “Barney’s Version” was typeset to wrap around a vodka bottle? “Absolut Mordecai.”

While the business model for paid advertising evolves, so does our distribution method. Our world now includes an audience that doesn’t expect to have to shell out for content. And so, in an effort to attract the big numbers—not to mention big data—we give away our valuable content for free on our websites, on other digital channels, and in e-newsletters. Our advertising partners, who in the past clamoured to be close to the content, now want to be the content. Our industry has survived the inventions of radio and television, but I don’t know of a time in which magazines have been under more pressure to reinvent themselves—because with new technology we can, and because with new technology we have to. We now compete in more places and in more ways than ever for our customers’ time and money.

My twenty-year-old, idealistic, sports-reporter self says, what has the world come to? My present, practical business self says disruption happens, get on with it. The magazine industry must adapt—all of us here—in order to keep growing. We are going to have to find new sources of revenue, new innovative ways to engage our audiences that they will pay for. And that means learning everything possible about our customers. We’re going to have to find out what’s important to them, and tap into that passion.

My optimistic self says, we can do this. Yes, because we don’t have a choice if we want to survive. But also because as magazine creators we are very, very good at captivating audiences with compelling stories. Magazines are still a highly authentic, trusted platform whose halo has already enabled our industry to expand far beyond print into mega media brands comprising digital, social, video, audio, events, stores, merchandise, and even restaurants. If we continue to tell compelling, relevant stories, in whatever form, the audience will be there and they will pay. We still need good, high-quality content and the talented creators behind it. We still need to recognize its value in our business.

Tonight, we celebrate excellence. Tonight, we celebrate the creators. And tonight, I offer congratulations to those of you—editors, art directors, writers, photographers, illustrators, and publishers—who know how to tell the powerful Canadian stories that have such a profound influence on our society.

Finally, I would like to end with a thank you to Cottage Life, and particularly to Al Zikovitz, my mentor, friend, and long-time boss, who every day teaches me something new about hard work, being adaptable, and chasing your dreams.

Thank you.


Penny Caldwell (@PennyCaldwell) is the publisher and vice-president of Cottage Life Media. At this year’s 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards she was presented with the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement. Read her complete National Magazine Awards bio here

ABOUT THE OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
The NMAF’s most prestigious individual prize  is the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, an award that recognizes an individual’s innovation and creativity through contributions to the magazine industry.

The award is open to circulation experts, editors, marketing, sales and promotion professionals, publishers, creators, designers, production managers – in short, to everyone in the industry. It cannot be given posthumously. The annual deadline for nominations is March 1.

For more information and previous winners, visit magazine-awards.com/oa.

Enter: 2017 NMA Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement

The National Magazine Awards Foundation is calling for nominations for the 2017 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, presented annually to an individual whose creativity and innovation over the course of their career have made a significant impact on the Canadian magazine industry.

Previous winners include Kim Pittaway, Kim Jernigan, Michael Fox, Stephen Trumper, Heather Robertson, Stephen Osborne, Jean Paré, Sally Armstrong, and more.

Nominations are welcome from anyone working in Canadian magazines, and must consist of:

  • A letter of nomination, including a brief bio of the nominee and a summary of their career achievements;
  • At least two (2) supporting letters from other individuals in the Canadian magazine industry or colleagues of the nominee.

There is no cost to nominate someone for the Outstanding Achievement Award.

Nominations are due by March 1, 2017 and can be emailed as a PDF to staff@magazine-awards.com or sent by mail to:
National Magazine Awards Foundation
2300 Yonge St, Suite 1600
Toronto, ON, M4P 1E4

The winner will be announced in April and will be presented with their award on stage at the 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards gala.

For more information visit magazine-awards.com/oa

Kim Pittaway’s impassioned Outstanding Achievement Award acceptance speech

At Friday evening’s 39th annual National Magazine Awards gala [read complete recap], Kim Pittaway received the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, acknowledging her long and distinguished career as a writer, editor, teacher and mentor in Canadian magazine journalism. Read Kim’s complete NMA bio.

On stage at Friday’s gala, Kim inspired a standing ovation from the audience of over 400 guests in attendance, affirming not only the Foundation’s decision to present Kim with this award but also the inspiration that Kim has been to so many of us in Canadian magazines.

Below, with her permission, we present Kim’s acceptance speech from the 39th annual National Magazine Awards gala.


Kim Pittaway: Thank you Beth, Rona and my other colleagues who nominated me, the Board of the NMAF and the friends and colleagues who have congratulated me following the announcement of this honour. I feel obliged to note that Joyce Byrne, President of the Foundation, called me with the news on April 1—April Fool’s Day. I chose to ignore that.

This is indeed an honour, especially as I review the list of those who have preceded me to the podium for the Outstanding Achievement Award. I’d like to begin my remarks by quoting one of them.

“It’s simple: We need each other.”

That’s how the late Catherine Keachie, then-president of the Canadian Magazine Publishers Association, described what she called the magazine publishing ecosystem. It was the early 1990s, and I was a 20-something writer, hired to help write position papers on split-run publishing, GST on magazines, the environmental impact of magazine publishing and more. It was a crash course in how the industry worked and Catherine was my instructor. Our best lines were crafted in conversation as she held forth passionately on why magazines were central to our national culture.

Catherine knew that it was essential for the industry to work together. The major publishers needed the cultural legitimacy of the small and literary publishers. The smalls and literaries needed the financial and political heft of the bigs. Sales and circulation teams needed strong editorial content to sell. Editorial teams needed the business support of those sales and circ teams to find their audiences and get their stories into readers’ homes and hands.

Magazines brands—on the page, online and in whatever other formats they may appear—are the products of many hands, an exciting mix of journalism, storytelling, sales, promotion, marketing and analysis, all geared to telling stories that will engage, delight and—at its best—challenge our audiences. And while all of us in this industry have a role in enabling that storytelling, at its centre are the creators: the writers, photographers and artists whose words and pictures speak to us, touch us, transform us, who tell our Canadian stories, celebrate our Canadian heroes and illuminate our Canadian perspectives—stories that are critical to our uniquely Canadian culture.

I can think of no other organization that I would rather be honoured by than the National Magazine Awards Foundation precisely because of the NMAF’s long focus on creators. The work I am proudest of hinges on creation: my own work as a writer, and my efforts to facilitate the creative work of others as an educator and editor.

After the announcement about this award was made, I joked with a colleague that the key to being nominated was to move away from Toronto—after a few years away, people forget what it was about you that irritated them. What I’m about to say may serve as a reminder.

Publishers and brands will inevitably tally up “their” wins tonight—a logical impulse, given that they provide the pages and the infrastructure to enable the sharing of those stories. But let’s be absolutely clear about why we are here tonight. We are here to celebrate the creators. We may call these the Mag Awards, but they are in fact the creators’ awards. Without the words, without the pictures, without the writers, photographers and illustrators, we’re not in the magazine business—we’re just peddling flyers. And we all know that as an industry where fees to writers, photographers and artists have not shifted appreciably in decades, a night that celebrates those creators, that thanks them for their efforts is, frankly, the least that we as an industry can do.

It’s simple, as Catherine told me. We need each other. And as we contemplate the way forward for our industry—and for this awards program—we would do well to remember that.

Thank you.

Kim Pittaway’s essay from the 39th NMA Gala Program

39th National Magazine Awards
Complete Gala Recap
Read Kim’s complete NMA bio
Press release: English | Français
Complete list [pdf] of all winners
Twitter highlights: @MagAwards | #NMA16
The Judges
Award Seals
La version française: magazine-prix.com

Photos by Steven Goetz.

Call for Nominations: Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement

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The National Magazine Awards Foundation is calling for nominations for the 2016 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, presented annually to an individual whose creativity and innovation over the course of their career have made a significant impact on the Canadian magazine industry.

Previous winners include Kim Jernigan, Michael Fox, Stephen Trumper, Heather Robertson, John Macfarlane, Stephen Osborne, Jean Paré, Sally Armstrong, Robert Fulford and more.

Nominations are welcome from anyone working in Canadian magazines, and must consist of:

  • A letter of nomination, including a brief bio of the nominee and a summary of their career achievements;
  • At least two (2) supporting letters from other individuals in the Canadian magazine industry or colleagues of the nominee.

There is no cost to nominate someone for the Outstanding Achievement Award.

Nominations are due by March 1, 2016 and can be emailed as a PDF to staff@magazine-awards.com or sent by mail to:
National Magazine Awards Foundation
2300 Yonge St, Suite 1600
Toronto, ON, M4P 1E4

The winner will be announced on May 2 and will be presented with their award on stage at the 39th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 10 in Toronto.

For more information visit magazine-awards.com/oa


Have you heard about the new Digital Publishing Awards? Submissions for this new awards program–recognizing and rewarding excellence by Canadian digital publishers and content creators–are being accepted until February 16. Awards will be presented in 14 categories, including Best Video, Best Podcast Series, Best Digital Design, Best Feature, Best Visual Storytelling, Best Editorial Package and more.

Announcing the winners of the 38th annual National Magazine Awards

The National Magazine Awards Foundation (NMAF) presented the winners of the 38th annual National Magazine Awards at a gala this evening in Toronto at the Arcadian Court, presented by CDS Global, and hosted by Lainey Lui & Jessica Allen of CTV’s The Social. Gold, Silver and Honourable Mention awards were presented in 43 categories.

La version française: magazine-prix.com
Complete list [pdf] of all winners
Press release [pdf]: English | Français
Twitter highlights: @MagAwards | #NMA15
The Judges
Award Seals

SPECIAL AWARDS

Magazine of the Year
Nouveau Projet

“Nouveau Projet is a near-perfect symbiosis of subject matter, expert writing and exceptionally original design. It sets itself apart thanks to inspiring themes and bold covers. The magazine offers a fresh take on the genre and dares to cover topics that are virtually absent in other media. The energy of the editorial team is tangible page after page. Nouveau Projet embodies the spirit of print magazines.” — National Magazine Awards jury


Magazine Website of the Year
Hazlittmag.com (Hazlitt)


Tablet Magazine of the Year
Today’s Parent

Best Magazine Brand
Sponsored by Ontario Media Development Corporation
Cottage Life

 

Best New Magazine Writer
Sponsored by Reader’s Digest Foundation
Genna Buck


Best New Illustrator or Photographer
Sponsored by RedPoint Media
Hudson Christie


Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement
Sponsored by Alliance for Audited Media
Michael Fox


AWARDS TABLE


INTEGRATED AWARDS – GOLD WINNERS
 
 

Best Single Issue
Sponsored by Rolland Enterprises, Inc
Back to School Issue (September 2014)
Today’s Parent


Magazine Covers
Hunter Is At It Again
Report on Business


Editorial Package (Web)
Miscarriage and Pregnancy Loss
Today’s Parent


Infographics
Fare Warning
Report on Business


Online Video
Ukraine in Crisis
Maclean’s

Single Service Article Package
30 Awesome Cupcakes
Today’s Parent

Words & Pictures
Sponsored by CDS Global
La pointe des utopies
Nouveau Projet

“Tonight the National Magazine Awards Foundation recognized the outstanding work of Canada’s magazine writers, editors, designers, photographers and illustrators. The nominees and winners of this year’s awards have set new standards of excellence in Canadian media, and on behalf of those working in our wonderful industry and magazine readers across the country, we congratulate them.” — Joyce Byrne, President, NMAF

WRITING AWARDS – GOLD WINNERS

Arts & Entertainment
Nicholas Hune-Brown
For Kids, By Kids—But Not For Long
Hazlitt

Best Short Feature
Michael Friscolanti
My Hitchhiker, the Parliament Hill Gunman
Maclean’s 

Business
Stephanie Nolen
High and Dry
Report on Business

Columns
Sponsored by Impresa Communications Ltd.
Eric Reguly
Jobs: Optional
Report on Business

Editorial Package (Print)
Mark Stevenson, Sue Allan, Stephen Gregory, Alison Uncles
Ottawa Shooting
Maclean’s

Essays
Andrea Bennett
Water Upon the Earth
Maisonneuve

Fiction
Tamas Dobozy
Kransnagorsk-2
The New Quarterly

Health & Medicine
Marie-Pier Elie
Immunothérapie. Le nouvel espoir
Québec Science

Humour
Richard Light
Reviews of My Dreams from Last Night
The Feathertale Review

Investigative Reporting
Alec Castonguay, Noémi Mercier
Crimes sexuels dans l’armée
L’actualité

One of a Kind
Noah Richler
The Trials of Philip Halliday
The Walrus

Personal Journalism
Lauren McKeon
Save Me from My Workout
Toronto Life

Poetry
Richard Greene
You Must Remember This
Hazlitt

Politics & Public Interest
Alec Castonguay, Noémi Mercier
Crimes sexuels dans l’armée
L’actualité

Profiles
Jason McBride
The Captive
Toronto Life

Science, Technology & Environment
Jeremy Keehn
The Toilet Papers
The Walrus

Service: Family, Health & Personal Finance
Danielle Groen
Where Do We Put All the Babies?
The Grid

Service: Lifestyle
The Editors
25th Annual Restaurant Awards
Vancouver Magazine

Society
Mylène Tremblay
Intersexualité : Rencontre du troisième sexe
Châtelaine

Sports & Recreation
Dan Robson
Home and Really Far Away
Sportsnet

Travel
Marie-Soleil Desautels
Au paradis des thés
L’actualité

 

VISUAL AWARDS – GOLD WINNERS

Art Direction of an Entire Issue
Sponsored by The Lowe-Martin Group
Jean-François Proulx
Le Canada dont nous ne voulons pas (printemps – été 2014)
Nouveau Projet

Art Direction of a Single Article
Sponsored by Monnet Design
Marcey Andrews
Best Summer Ever
New Trail
17333_26

Fashion
Chris Nicholls, Photographer
Eng Lau, Art Director
Zeina Esmail, Stylist
Human Touch
Fashion Magazine

Homes & Gardens
Karen Simpson, Art Director
Naho Kubota, Photographer
Catherine Osborne, Will Jones, Contributors
On Canal Lake
Azure

Illustration
Raymond Biesinger
The Well-Oiled Machine
Precedent

Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Sponsored by CNW Group
Larry Towell
In Attawapiskat
The Walrus

Portrait Photography
John Ulan
Bigger Than Barriers
Cornerstone

Spot Illustration
Sébastien Thibault
The Rising Tide
The Walrus

Still-Life Photography
Clinton Hussey
Origin Story
Western Living

To view the complete list of Gold and Silver winners and Honourable Mentions, visit magazine-awards.com/38winners.

ABOUT THE 38th ANNUAL NATIONAL MAGAZINE AWARDS
More than 450 members of the Canadian magazine industry—publishers, editors, art directors, writers, photographers, illustrators, circulators and more—joined esteemed sponsors and other guests at the 38th annual National Magazine Awards gala, at the Arcadian Court in Toronto, presented by CDS Global.

This year more than 200 Canadian magazines submitted their work to the National Magazine Awards. Magazines from all three coasts—in both official languages, print and digital—participated this year, entering work created by more than 3000 writers, editors, photographers, illustrators, art directors and other creators. This year saw growth in participation from Quebec and Alberta magazines, as well as remarkable participation from Canada’s literary and arts magazines through the help of the NMAF’s Small Magazine Rebate program.

The NMAF’s 241 volunteer judges have nominated a total of 326 submissions from 80 different Canadian magazines for awards in 43 written, visual, integrated and special categories. More than $53,000 in cash prizes have been awarded to Canadian creators.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The National Magazine Awards Foundation gratefully acknowledges the support of its sponsors and suppliers.

THANK YOU LAINEY & JESS!
The NMAF (and all guests of the National Magazine Awards) are grateful to Lainey Lui & Jessica Allen for their incredible performance tonight.

PHOTOS, VIDEOS, INTERVIEW & MORE
Check back next week for photos, videos and more from the 38th annual National Magazine Awards gala.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL MAGAZINE AWARDS FOUNDATION
The National Magazine Awards Foundation is a bilingual, not-for-profit institution whose mission is to recognize and promote excellence in the content and creation of Canadian print and digital publications through an annual program of awards and national publicity efforts. Discover more at magazine-awards.com.