Off the Page, with Maisonneuve Publisher Jennifer Varkonyi

Off the Page is a regular interview series featuring National Magazine Award winners. Recently we caught up with Jennifer Varkonyi, publisher of Maisonneuve, which was named Canada’s Magazine of the Year in 2016, among 5 NMAs it took home last year. A quarterly magazine of arts, literature, ideas and culture, published in English in Montreal, Maisonneuve publishes new and established writers, artists and photojournalists packaged around award-winning design.

NMAF: Congratulations again on winning Magazine of the Year in 2016, the third such honour for Maisonneuve since 2004. In presenting the award, the NMA jury said:

Maisonneuve fulfills its bold mandate of ‘banishing boring,’ clearly striving to engage, inform and inspire. From its refreshing and imaginative art direction to its passionate editorial voice, the magazine feels like it’s constantly evolving, yet at the same time seems to connect with a sense of familiarity with its readers.”

As a publisher, how do you achieve this winning formula of evolution and continuity? And what was the significance to you and your team of winning the big award?

Jennifer: The answer is simple: the people. Maisonneuve has been blessed with great editors, art directors, writers, artists and interns who give their all to the magazine. We take the editorial process seriously, which means we do everything we can to help writers shape their stories to be the best they can be.

This striving for excellence has been a part of the magazine’s ethos from the very beginning, with founder Derek Webster’s drive to create a magazine that reflected intelligence, humour, and genuine curiosity, and the tradition has been carried forward by Carmine Starnino, Drew Nelles, Haley Cullingham, Daniel Viola and now Andrea Bennett.

Winning Magazine of the Year is significant for Maisonneuve. It reminds us that the hours upon hours of toil the editors dedicate to a fifth draft, or to tweaking display copy or scouring for typos, are noticed by readers and recognized within the magazine community. Being in Montreal can feel a little isolating at times, so coming to Toronto and winning the top honour is gratifying. The win also helps raise the magazine’s profile, especially among contributors, and it draws more people to the magazine.

NMAF: What three words or phrases describe the typical Maisonneuve reader? To what extent do you think about your current (and future) readers when you’re putting together and promoting a magazine issue?

Jennifer: I think here I have to go with the three qualities I used earlier: our readers are intelligent, have a sense of humour, and are curious about Canada and the world around them.

As publisher I consult with the editor-in-chief about upcoming issues, stories and themes, but the work of putting the content together really rests on the shoulders of the editors. Our editors ask themselves how they can best draw the reader into the story – how to begin a feature about, say, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in the North? How do you grab someone’s attention when discussing the politics of creating a national park? What messages do our graphics send, and are words and images working in unison? These are the kind of questions considered around the editorial table.

NMAF: What are the biggest challenges for a (small) magazine publisher in 2017? How do you address them?

Jennifer: The biggest challenges are resources (money) and maintaining circulation. Many people have a lot of love for the magazine, but connecting with that love and growing circulation even to 5,000 is a huge challenge. That’s partly a reflection of a competitive environment: there is so much amazing content out there competing for eyeballs and subscribers.

The Internet has put small Canadian magazines into direct competition with every other magazine in the world. Without our grants from all levels of government, we would not survive. I wish we were not so dependent on these funds, but it is a reality for most small Canadian magazines. Former editor Daniel Viola recently remarked to me that Maisonneuve runs on enthusiasm, and that is exactly right. I wish we could provide more remuneration to everyone who contributes to the magazine. I think every small magazine editor and publisher in Canada feels that way!

NMAF: Maisonneuve has a national perspective, but also very clearly reflects its Quebec and Montreal heritage. In many ways, Maisonneuve could be said to be the voice of Quebec for the rest of English Canada, in literature, art and current events. How has the magazine embraced this role, and why is it important to project Quebec (and Montreal) onto the national stage?

Jennifer: Maisonneuve has always wanted to blur borders – be they real or ideological. The magazine’s identity is rooted in Montreal, but it’s a cosmopolitan identity (which is very Montreal) so the result on the page is wide-ranging and eclectic. There are regular moments, such as in the Writing from Quebec section, where we shine a light on some new writing from the francophone community, but I think the voice of Quebec is more consistently found in the excellent reporting of L’actualité and the refined cultural commentary of Nouveau Projet, for example.

Maisonneuve really is a national magazine in its scope and story selection. There was a Beaverton headline that made me laugh recently – “Montreal declared the ‘I don’t know I’m just trying to figure my shit out’ capital of Canada” – and I certainly fit this bill when I was 19 and moved to Montreal from Saskatoon. The point being: Montreal presents an alternative to the norm, be it “Toronto” or “English” or whatever – you can do things a little differently in Montreal. Maisonneuve embraces this difference, and people appreciate that.

Jennifer Varkonyi (second from left, with envelope) accepts the National Magazine Award for Magazine of the Year with (from right) former Maisonneuve editors Daniel Viola and Haley Cullingham, former art director Anna Minzhulina, and Gala host Chris Turner.
Jennifer Varkonyi (second from left, with envelope) accepts the National Magazine Award for Magazine of the Year with (from right) former Maisonneuve editors Daniel Viola and Haley Cullingham, former art director Anna Minzhulina, and Gala host Chris Turner at the 2016 National Magazine Awards.

 

NMAF: Based on Maisonneuve’s success, what advice would you give to small magazine publishers who are concerned they can’t compete against larger magazines on newsstands (real and virtual) or at the National Magazine Awards?

Jennifer: I think the key is to take chances. Take chances on people, on ideas, on an opening, on a story’s length. If an editor’s interest is piqued, chances are readers will be interested too. One thing that small magazines have going for them is that enthusiasm I mentioned earlier, without the punishing production cycle of larger magazines, so editors can take a little more time with a story, push for something slightly better, and the results can be astonishingly rewarding. That doesn’t pay the rent, but this is where a gold medal from the National Magazine Awards makes the sacrifices worthwhile.


Jennifer Varkonyi is the publisher of Maisonneuve, Canada’s reigning Magazine of the Year. Find out more at Maisonneuve.org, or subscribe and get 2 years (8 issues) for just $30

Download the 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards guide to submissions.

National Magazine Award for Magazine of the Year
Submissions to the 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards are now open for submissions. The award for Magazine of the Year honours the magazine that most consistently engages, surprises and serves the needs of its readers. This award recognizes outstanding achievement in magazine publishing over the past year.

The jury shall evaluate each candidate for Magazine of the Year according to four general criteria—quality, innovation, impact, and brand awareness—and its success relative to the magazine’s editorial mandate. Each submitter will need to complete an application form providing details supporting each criterion. There will be 5 finalists for this award and one overall winner.

The deadline for submissions for Magazine of the Year is January 27.
(For all other categories, the deadline is January 20).

magazine-awards.com

Off the Page, with Marta Iwanek

Off the Page is a regular interview series featuring National Magazine Award winners. Recently we caught up with photojournalist Marta Iwanek, who in 2016 was named Canada’s Best New Magazine Photographer from the National Magazine Awards Foundation, in addition to winning the Gold Medal for Photojournalism & Photo Essay for her incredible reporting of the 2013-2014 Ukrainian crisis, titled “The Maidan” (Maisonneuve).

NMAF: In your award-winning photo essay, “The Maidan,” you take the reader on a journey to a winter in Kyiv, where thousands of Ukrainians gathered to take a courageous stand against their government. You capture the Maidan as a place of fear and uncertainty, but also of community and solidarity. How did you get a sense of the place when you arrived, and what were the human emotions that spoke to you as a photographer?

Marta: I first arrived in Kyiv in early November (2013) before any of the protests had started. I remember driving through the centre of the city and thinking what a bustling metropolis it was. Then I went out east to work on a film and returned in late November a little after the pro-European protests had begun. Everything was still calm at that point and there was a sense of hopefulness among the crowd.

The protest was to last nine days, but on the last night everything changed. The remaining protestors were chased out of Independence Square (Maidan) and beaten by police, angering many people. On December 1 a large demonstration occurred in Kyiv where the people re-took the square and the movement that became known as “the Maidan” began. I was supposed to fly back to Toronto shortly after, but realized I couldn’t leave.

The feeling was so powerful and strong among the people. It felt like people had been pushed to an edge and they had nothing more to lose. There were feelings of frustration, abandonment and urgency. At the same time, you could still find the glimpses of hope and community as people unified under one cause–to oust then President Yanukovych. I was always trying to show those emotions in my photos and trying to understand the situation deeper, trying to figure out what made it this way? I changed my flight and ended up staying three months, living among the protestors and spending my days and nights wandering the square, talking to people and trying to make sense of it.

I like to immerse myself in stories as much as possible and I hope this translates in my photos. It was also a story I felt personally connected to because my roots are Ukrainian and I grew up in the Ukrainian diaspora in Toronto. I grew up listening to the stories of Ukraine’s constant struggle for independence and to be free of corruption, so the feelings of the people in the square were not foreign to me. However, this time, it wasn’t just my parents talking about it in Canada, detached from the situation and it’s consequences. It was happening in front of me. When it was finally time to leave, I will always remember that contrast I felt when I first arrived in the capital and when I left–the place, the people and the country had been changed forever.

During my years as the art director of Maisonneuve magazine, I had the opportunity to work with many talented women photographers—each one a unique visual voice. Marta Iwanek stands out for the way she brings her compassion to a body of work that sits on the edge of war and peace, among fire and smoke, between life and death situations, especially with her Ukrainian “Maidan” project.
Anna Minzhulina, former art director, Maisonneuve

NMAF: Over one hundred people were killed in the government reprisals, and you spent time not only on the front lines but also with those who were wounded and grieving. How did you balance your own safety with your passion for capturing every aspect of the story? And did you learn anything about yourself as a journalist that will assist you in the future?

Marta: There were certain days that felt very unsafe on the square, but the majority of my time spent there, things were peaceful. There would be flare-ups between police and protestors and then things would resume back to “normal.” I looked to other, more experienced photojournalists in the square for guidance and advice. I had only been freelancing for three months at that point, fresh out of college and had found myself in the middle of the news cauldron that was Kyiv.

There were many times that I was scared. Even today I think I still would be. The most important thing I learned in those kinds of situations is to trust your gut. There were certain situations I decided to be close-up and others I held back from. Sometimes, I beat myself up for not being in the right place or holding back too much, but you have to be honest with yourself and with what you’re willing to do. It took quite a while to reconcile these feelings, but the experience taught me that I’m not a conflict photographer.

Many photojournalists starting out often have a dream of covering foreign stories and conflicts. I didn’t go to Ukraine searching out a conflict to photograph, I just happened to be there when it all started. And a part of me left feeling like I had failed as a journalist because I hadn’t gotten the most heated moments, and I was actually back in Canada on the day that over a hundred protestors were shot. For me, it was more emotionally heavy to be away from the square during that time than when I was in it. Not knowing about the fate of many friends who were there, as well as feeling the guilt of not being there, took a toll.

We’re taught to want to be this travelling, conflict photographer, but that’s not who all of us are. The whole time on the square, I found myself being much more drawn and interested in the quieter moments and it took me a while to realize those moments are just as important too.

We are all unique and we will all notice different things in similar situations and we will be better at photographing in certain situations over others. Journalism is a communal effort and we need to be honest with ourselves, find out the type of stories you’re best at and are drawn to. Then don’t be afraid to do it.

NMAF: That was over three years ago, and since then Ukraine has experienced war and occupation perhaps beyond the worst fears of those who gathered on the Maidan. How has this story stayed with you since then? 

Marta: My time on the Maidan has been one of the factors that keeps driving me to keep coming back to this region and exploring the underlying issues more deeply, looking at why things are the way they are now, what’s caused them and what keeps causing them?

It’s also something I’ve always wanted to do because my background is Ukrainian. I’ve always been drawn to Ukraine and Eastern Europe because I’ve grown up with my cultural heritage being so central in my life, from participating in folk activities, being involved in the diaspora community to regular dinner table conversations about Eastern European politics. I actually started primary school barely speaking English because at home we just spoke Ukrainian. It has a huge place in my heart. I’ve started looking at my own family’s history in the area, connecting with relatives and following the story of Ukrainians in Poland who were deported from the South-Eastern territories in 1947 under military Operation Vistula. Deportations are a huge part of Eastern Europe’s history and play a huge factor in why things are the way they are today.

There has definitely been media fatigue with Ukraine as the conflict reaches yet another year. It’s why I think it’s more important than ever to stay with the story and understand what is happening there, to put the past and the future in greater context for the average viewer.

NMAF: For the camera nerds, what bodies and lenses do you shoot with? And what was your technical approach to the photography on the Maidan? 

Marta: Back then, during those three months on the Maidan, I was using a D600 and a 35mm f/2 and a 24-70mm. This is still my favourite set-up although now I have a D810 with a 35mm f/1.4. My technical approach is to go as light on gear as possible, zoom with your feet and build intimacy with the people you are photographing. This will create a much better photo than any lens or camera body can.

NMAF: You worked with Anna Minzhulina, then the art director of Maisonneuve, who said she was stunned by the evocative scenes and characters that jumped out from your images. Can you describe the creative process of how the two of you edited your body of work into a story that connected with the magazine reader? 

Marta: Anna is an extremely talented and passionate editor and I am so grateful for her eye. Editing is an art of its own and a skill many photographers often lack, myself included. It was also a story I had immersed myself in, so it can be very hard to be objective about the photos when editing, which is where Anna came in.

So often, I would attach a personal memory or story to a photo and Anna was able to single out the photos that could still speak to a viewer who was encountering them without all the backstory. She chose the photos that could speak on their own and spoke together cohesively to tell the story of the square.

It was also exciting to be able to tell a story in a magazine over so much space. The majority of my time I’ve spent working in newspapers where it’s usually one image to tell a story, but here it was a different process of how the photos work together to form a narrative.

Women photographers are still an anomaly in the male-dominated documentary photo world, with its emphasis on traditionally masculine values like the courage and bravery to ‘shoot’ with a camera. We need to encourage more female visual voices like Iwanek’s here in Canada and around the world. Death does not distinguish between genders. It takes all. But I’m interested in how the female eye looking through a photographic lens might see it differently. It’s important that we have different perspectives, that we pay attention to what they might show us that we haven’t considered before. That’s why we need exposure to more work of female war photographers, such as Iwanek.
Anna Minzhulina, former art director, Maisonneuve

NMAF: The night of the 2016 National Magazine Awards, you didn’t have a ticket to get in, but as the show started you were hanging out in the foyer in case your name was called. And it was—twice! What was that experience like? And when you were on stage accepting your awards, what was your message to the audience?

Marta: I was generously given a seat at the sponsor table and so in the end I was able to attend the awards. I had a small cheer crew at the table and we had a lot of fun. I hadn’t prepared a speech, but I just went up there and spoke from my heart. I thanked everyone who helped me and it was great to see Anna in the audience as I spoke. I was also thankful that the recognition of the award would bring more attention to the story, which had greatly fallen off the news cycle. It’s a story close to me and so I’m grateful for any opportunity to talk about it.

Marta Iwanek accepts the National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Photographer at the 2016 Gala.
Marta Iwanek accepts the National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Photographer at the 2016 Gala.

 

NMAF: Can you tell us about some of your latest projects, and what you’re up to next as a journalist? 

Marta: A project titled “Darling” was actually one of my first projects and still one close to my heart. It is a story about an elderly couple in Trenton, Ontario, where Lex Duncan is the at-home-caregiver for his wife Mary Duncan, who has dementia. I started it as a way to reconnect with a generation I felt I didn’t get a good chance to know after my last grandparent died.

It was a project to deal with the loss and also understanding what my parents, as well as countless others in our country are facing as they care for an ailing loved one. I am so grateful to the Duncan family who opened up their home to me and gave me a chance to get to know them and tell this story.

Lex Duncan wakes his wife Mary up in the morning in Trenton, Ontario. Mary was diagnosed with dementia in 2008 and Lex cared for her in their home until she died in 2015. (Photo courtesy Marta Iwanek.)
Lex Duncan wakes his wife Mary up in the morning in Trenton, Ontario. Mary was diagnosed with dementia in 2008 and Lex cared for her in their home until she died in 2015. (Photo courtesy Marta Iwanek.)

 

This year I started photographing in the villages my grandparents came from. They were once Ukrainian villages but after WWII became part of Poland and the majority of the Ukrainians who lived there were deported and dispersed either to Soviet Ukraine or throughout Poland, my grandparents included.

I’ve always been curious about my roots and grew up with a father who has worked as a historian, making films and writing books on eastern European history. So after the Maidan I became interested in exploring Eastern Europe on a deeper level and understanding events in the past that have an effect on the present. Through this project I want to explore how identity changes when a culture is displaced from its ancestral land. It’s been a very personal project, but I’ve also found it to be incredibly universal through the many forced migrations happening throughout the world today.


Marta Iwanek is a National Magazine Award-winning photojournalist whose work has appeared in Maisonneuve, Maclean’s, the Toronto Star, the Globe and Mail, and other publications. In 2016 she was named Canada’s Best New Magazine Photographer by the National Magazine Awards Foundation. Discover more of her work at martaiwanek.com

The 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards are open for submissions until January 20, including three different categories for photography. Enter at magazine-awards.com.

Read more Off the Page interviews with National Magazine Award-winning photographers including Roger LeMoyne and Ian Willms.

NMA gala photos by Steven Goetz for the National Magazine Awards Foundation. 

Holiday Magazine Subscription Guide

Looking for that perfect (okay, perfect last-minute) stocking stuffer? Do they love to read, laugh, cook or shop? Do they love great writing, photography and illustration? Then stuff a great, National Magazine Award-winning magazine in that stocking. Here are some of our favourites from 2016. (And for more ideas, check out our holiday book guide, with new books by NMA-winning writers.)

Maisonneuve
A quarterly magazine of arts, literature, ideas and culture, published in English in Montreal. You’ll find a great mix of new and established writers, artists and photojournalists packaged around award-winning design. A perfect magazine for an afternoon on the sofa or a long train ride home. Also, it’s Canada’s Magazine of the Year in 2016 (1 of 5 NMAs it won this year), so you know every issue is a must-read.
2 years (8 issues) for just $30

Ricardo
Absolutely required magazine reading for any foodie and aficionado of food culture. Ricardo won the National Magazine Awards for Best Brand and Best Service Editorial Package, and delivers recipes, dinner party plans and lots of other great ideas.
6 issues for $30, plus a gift, a free iPad edition, and 15% discount at the online store

Eighteen Bridges
Winner of 4 National Magazine Awards in 2016 including Essays and Investigative Reporting, this thought-provoking magazine of longform journalism published in Edmonton is consistent in introducing readers to Canada’s best writers and important stories.
4 issues for $26

CNQ: Canadian Notes & Queries
Winner of the 2016 National Magazine Award for Fiction, CNQ publishes some of this country’s finest literary criticism, poetry, graphic works, and short fiction.
1 year (3 issues) for just $25

Vallum
Winner of the 2016 National Magazine Award for Poetry, Vallum is one of Canada’s very best publications for poetry and literary reviews, and regularly features Canada’s best poets as well as emerging ones.
1 year (2 issues) for $20

Globe Style Advisor
Also a winner of 4 National Magazine Awards in 2016 for its photography and design, Globe Style is one of our favourites for fashion and style journalism. Get it with your Globe & Mail subscription. And you can get award-winning Report on Business magazine, too.

Western Living
An award-winning magazine of design, decor, lifestyle and more, Western Living was a 2016 National Magazine Award winner and consistently delivers quality ideas that are in line with the latest and greatest trends.
1 year (10 issues) digitally for just $18

The Feathertale Review
A literary magazine dedicated to great humour (twice an NMA winner in that category), Feathertale makes a great gift for anyone who loves to laugh and enjoys the lighter side of CanLit.
1 year (4 issues) for $30

Cottage Life
A Canadian tradition in a magazine, Cottage Life is not only the perfect companion to country living in all four seasons, it mixes practical advice with award-winning journalism. Don’t go into the woods without it.
1 year all access print and digital for $30

Check out all the winners from the 2016 National Magazine Awards for more great gift ideas.


Submissions are now being accepted for the 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards. Read all about it and enter at magazine-awards.com. Deadline January 20

Who will be Canada’s Magazine of the Year? | NMA 2016 Nominees

One week from tonight–June 10–Canada’s top magazine writers, editors, artists and other creators will gather for the 39th annual National Magazine Awards. [Tickets & Gala Info].

This year the jury has selected four finalists for the most coveted award, Magazine of the Year, from among hundreds of great Canadian magazines. The award for Magazine of the Year goes to the publication that most consistency engages, surprises and serves the needs of its readers.

One of these incredible magazines will be named the 2016 Magazine of the Year. Here are this year’s nominees…


Canadian Geographic

Gilles Gagnier, Publisher
Aaron Kylie, Editor
Javier Frutos, Art Director
Published by Royal Canadian Geographic Society

With a steadfast mission to make Canada better known to Canadians and to the world, Canadian Geographic reports on all aspects—physical, biological, historical, cultural and economic—of Canada’s geography with in-depth reporting and brilliant photography and maps. In 2015 the magazine soared especially high with initiatives including the popular National Bird Project, a stunning feature on Canada’s one hundred greatest living explorers, a comprehensive editorial package of Wood Buffalo National Park, an innovative urban mapping project, and an exclusive feature on Canada’s vanishing insect species.

Canadian Geographic has mastered the art of building commitment to its readers. The range of topics in each issue is always delightfully surprising, the layouts are varied and inviting, and the overall quality is constant from cover to cover. Canadian Geographic is a magazine for all Canadians.
–National Magazine Awards jury

Canadian Geographic is nominated for 3 National Magazine Awards, including Photojournalism & Photo Essay, Spot Illustration, and Magazine of the Year.


Caribou

Geneviève Vézina-Montplaisir, Publisher
Geneviève Vézina-Montplaisir, Véronique Leduc, Editors-in-Chief
Tania Jiménez, Art Director
Published by Cervidés Média, inc.

Launched in 2014, Caribou is a reflection of culinary culture in Quebec. Mixing stories and visual art that aim to inform and entertain, Caribou is not your typical culinary magazine: you will find no recipes, but rather expansive and surprising reports on Québecois food and agriculture. In 2015 many of the magazine’s stories gained coverage in the mass media, while art director Tania Jiménez won a Grafika Award for magazine design and cofounder Vincent Fortier won the Grand honneurs at the FPJQ awards for his reportage Road trip boréal.

With its unexpected editorial content and impeccable presentation, Caribou is the good news of the year. The art direction is a perfect reflection of the text, which has a unique point of view but is never pretentious. This is a magazine that shows us that reality and un-retouched beauty can go hand in hand to make an elegant package.
–National Magazine Awards jury

Caribou is nominated for 2 National Magazine Awards, including Best Art Direction of an Entire Issue, and Magazine of the Year.


Maisonneuve

Jennifer Varkonyi, Publisher
Haley Cullingham, Daniel Viola, Editors
Anna Minzhulina, Art Director
Published by Maisonneuve Magazine Association

Embracing serious and thoughtful storytelling enlivened by sumptuous design and packaging, Maisonneuve is an ambitious arts and cultural quarterly that lives by a simple rule: Don’t be boring. In 2015 its journalists—from Canadian literary legends to emerging young writers and photographers—boldly reported on the struggles of the spouses of Canadian soldiers with PTSD, the Ukrainian revolution, sexism at the Calgary Stampede, anti-Semitism in Quebec, Vancouver’s non-binary drag performers, Yukoners with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, and the contentious debate over female ejaculation.

Maisonneuve fulfills its bold mandate of “banishing boring,” clearly striving to engage, inform and inspire. From its refreshing and imaginative art direction to its passionate editorial voice, the magazine feels like its constantly evolving, yet at the same time seems to connect with a sense of familiarity with its readers.
–National Magazine Awards jury

Maisonneuve is nominated for 18 National Magazine Awards, including Essays, Politics & Public Interest, Magazine Covers, Illustration, and Magazine of the Year.


Nouveau Projet

Nicolas Langelier, Publisher & Editor-in-Chief
Jean-François Proulx, Art Director
Published by Atelier 10

A cultural and societal magazine that aspires to foster public discourse and encourage readers to live more satisfying, informed and meaningful lives, Nouveau Projet publishes comprehensive essays, reportage and graphic narratives enveloped in award-winning design. In 2015 the magazine published an expansive 50-page package on the new frontiers of Quebec, and opened the doors on a new storefront in Montreal, where the curious can purchase publications by Atelier 10 and discover beautiful Québec creations.

Dynamic, profound and prevailing, Nouveau Projet speaks to our intelligence without ever being intimidating. The layout design is sober and elegant, varied but cohesive, and the photography is not only efficient but distinguished. The production quality makes it somewhat of a gift that we want to cherish and share.
–National Magazine Awards jury

Nouveau Projet is nominated for 5 National Magazine Awards, including Essays, One of a Kind, Words & Pictures, Best Single Issue, and Magazine of the Year.


Who do you think is most worthy of the award for Magazine of the Year? Leave us a comment or tell us on Twitter: @MagAwards | #NMA16.

Tickets are on sale for the 39th annual National Magazine Awards gala, Friday June 10 at the Arcadian Court in Toronto.

Vote for Canada’s Best Magazine Cover

See the National Magazine Awards nominees for:
Best Magazine Brand
Best New Magazine Writer
Best New Magazine Photographer
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Fiction
Poetry
Single Service Article Package
Illustration

Art Direction of an Entire Issue
Art Direction of a Single Article
Portrait Photography
Words & Pictures
Best Single Issue
Magazine Covers
Columns
Fashion

Complete nominations coverage

Vote for Canada’s Best Magazine Cover | NMA 2016 Nominees

[This post has been updated] No single element of magazine publishing encapsulates the relationship between editorial, design, circulation and audience quite like the Magazine Cover. A great cover sells the stories within the magazine. And it also tells a story of its own, through eye-catching visual art, arresting cover lines, and perhaps a bit of that ephemeral je ne sais quoi.

The nominations for the 39th annual National Magazine Awards have been announced, and our judges have selected 10 finalists for this year’s award for best Magazine Cover. The Gold and Silver winners will be announced at the National Magazine Awards gala on June 10 in Toronto. [Tickets & Gala info]

Here they are, the Top 10 Magazine Covers of the Year.



VOTE RESULTS
Between May 31 and June 6, 410 people voted, and the winner of the People’s Choice for Best Magazine Cover is…

 

The juried winners for the Gold and Silver medals in Best Magazine Cover will be presented on Friday June 10 at the 39th annual National Magazine Awards. Tickets

Follow the action on Twitter: @MagAwards | #NMA16.

See the National Magazine Awards nominees for:
Fashion
Best Magazine Brand
Best New Magazine Writer
Best New Magazine Photographer
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Fiction
Single Service Article Package
Illustration

Art Direction of an Entire Issue
Portrait Photography
Words & Pictures
Best Single Issue

Complete nominations coverage

Best Canadian Magazine Photojournalists | NMA 2016 Nominees

On June 10th journalists from around the country will gather at the 39th annual National Magazine Awards gala, where one of the awards presented will recognize excellence in Photojournalism & Photo Essay, an award sponsored by the CNW Group.

[Tickets & Gala Info]

Here are the nominees. Tweet us your comments @MagAwards | #NMA16


Paul Colangelo
World Beater
Canadian Geographic


17731_26

Kamil Bialous
A Whale of A Story
Cottage Life


18112_26

Peter Mather
Running with the Herd
Maclean’s


18113_26

Peter Mather
Shingle Point and Shoot
Maclean’s


18569_26

Angela Gzowski
Foraging for Fortunes
Maisonneuve


17739_26

Marta Iwanek
The Maidan
Maisonneuve


Lana Šlezić
If These Walls Could Talk
The Walrus


Congratulations to our finalists for Photojournalism & Photo Essay. Tweet us your comments @MagAwards | #NMA16

The Gold and Silver medal winners will be revealed at the 39th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 10. Tickets

Meet the National Magazine Awards nominees for:
Best New Magazine Writer
Best New Magazine Photographer
Single Service Article Package
Illustration

Art Direction of an Entire Issue
Portrait Photography
Words & Pictures

Complete nominations coverage

NMA 2016 Nominees: Meet the finalists for Best New Magazine Photographer

The 39th annual National Magazine Awards are coming up on June 10 and the entire Canadian magazine industry is getting ready to see whose work will be recognized at this year’s gala.

It’s always exciting to see the nominees for our best new creator categories (Best New Magazine Illustrator* / Photographer and Best New Magazine Writer) as we’re exposed to some of the Canadian magazine industry’s great, emerging talent.

The finalists have been announced and this year’s jury has nominated four finalists for the Best New Photographer award. The winner will be announced at the National Magazine Awards gala on June 10 in Toronto.  [Tickets & Gala Info].

Tweet us your comments at @MagAwards | #NMA16.

And now, please meet your finalists for Canada’s Best New Magazine Photographer…

SexEdRevolution

Luis Mora

Luis Mora’s portrait series for Toronto Life, “The Sex Ed Revolution” focused on changes to Toronto’s sex education curriculum and featured subjects who had never been professionally photographed, and had reservations about appearing in a major magazine themselves, never mind having their children participate. Mora’s talent in disarming his subjects’ apprehensions resulted in an honest, nuanced and powerful portrait series.

“His enthusiasm, energetic personality and unwavering professionalism give Mora the exceptional ability to put inexperienced and apprehensive strangers at ease.”
– Daniel Neuhaus, Director of Photography, Toronto Life

SexEd2

Mora approached this photo essay with courage and consistency, and as a result, touched his audience with the emotion that lives just beneath the surface of his subjects, expertly portraying them with honesty and transparency.
– National Magazine Awards Jury

TL3

Luis Mora is a full-time photographer whose work has appeared in numerous magazines including Toronto Life, VICE, FSHN Unlimited, The Kit, ELLE Canada and Flare.


Maiden

Marta Iwanek

Marta Iwanek’s photo essay, “The Maidan” published in Maisonneuve, introduces us to the human element in any conflict – the collateral damage. Armed with only a camera, Iwanek travelled to Ukraine in 2014 to march alongside protestors, and amidst the backdrop of armed forces, burning buildings and explosions, was able to expose the basic human longings that are written in her subjects’ faces.

Iwanek is a brave, courageous and objective photographer who digs beneath the surface, is unafraid to pose questions and leaves us wondering how we can make this world a better place.
– Anna Minzhulina, Art Director, Maisonneuve

2

Each of Iwanek’s 14 photos is powerful and emotive, and together they expertly document the enormity, confusion and emotional drama of Ukraine’s revolution. Her use of light and treatment of imagery have a stunning impact, and her coverage of this topic is a masterful achievement and stunning example of photojournalism.
– National Magazine Awards Jury

3

Marta Iwanek is a Toronto-based photojournalist whose work has been published in various publications including the Canadian Press, the Toronto Star, The Globe and Mail, Maclean’s and Maisonneuve.


FaceTime

Hannah Eden

Hannah Eden was wandering through a city in Yellowknife, on the lookout for her next subject, when she popped her head into a carver’s studio and photographed him for “Face Time” published in Up Here. Whether the shoot is taking place on a windswept frozen lake at -40 C, amidst a cloud of summer bugs, or involves wrangling children on the tundra, Eden shows no fear when confronted with challenges.

 Hannah Eden has flown above the Arctic Circle to remote communities, driven hundreds of kilometres of roads through the southern NWT and visited far-flung fishing lodges across the North, returning with rare, compelling images and videos.
– Daniel Campbell, Associate Editor, Up Here

Hannah Eden is a graduate of the photojournalism program at Loyalist College and a multimedia photojournalist, originally from the U.K., currently living in Yellowknife.

Simple, elegant and impeccably executed, Eden’s portraits capture an exposition of truth in the faces of her subject, as she applied a concept of juxtaposition to reveal what lay beneath the surface of what’s expected. Though a brief essay, there’s an undeniably thorough and compelling visual story being told.
– National Magazine Awards Jury


Filler1

Ted Belton

Ted Belton is an anthropologist armed with a camera, whose creative vision continually proves his ability to excavate the spirit of the moment. He strays from the norm, as seen in his conception of an editorial on through to his final images, as was demonstrated in “Fringe & Fluff” for FILLER Magazine. Belton has a creative mind, inspiring attitude, passionate work ethic and is a well-respected collaborator.

Ted’s work demonstrates an exceptional eye—the eye of an artist and an art lover. Each photo he shoots wear the Belton stamp: raw and romantic. Ted turns fashion into art.
– Jennifer Lee, Editorial Director, FILLER Magazine

Showing tremendous maturity, range, precision and forethought, Belton approached his subjects with sensitivity and a keen eye, resulting in images that are saturated with depth and expressiveness. His work is at once classic, current and relevant.
– National Magazine Awards Jury

Ted Belton is a Toronto-based portrait and fashion photographer.


Congratulations to our 4 finalists for Best New Magazine Photographer. Tweet us your comments at @MagAwards | #NMA16.

The winner will be revealted at the 39th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 10. Tickets

About the Award for Best New Magazine Photographer:
The awards for Best New Magazine Photographer and Best New Magazine Illustrator are presented to Canadian visual artists whose early work in Canadian magazines shows the highest degree of craft and promise. Submissions are open to any Canadian editorial artist with a maximum of 3 years’ professional experience in journalism. Submissions are due every year by January 15, and submitted work must have been published within the 3 years prior to the due date.

*The awards for Best New Magazine Illustrator and Best New Magazine Photographer are presented in alternating years.

Meet the National Magazine Awards nominees for:
Illustration

Art Direction of an Entire Issue
Portrait Photography
Words & Pictures

Complete nominations coverage

Special thanks to Leah Jensen for her reporting.