Best Practices: How to leverage your National Magazine Award

NMA_BestPractivesGuide_FINAL

Did you win a National Magazine Award at this year’s gala? Were you a nominee? If so, we’ve created a guide just for you.

The NMAF is pleased to introduce the first volume of our Best Practices Guide. This guide is an extensive resource for how National Magazine Award winners and nominees can best leverage their recognition of magazine excellence.

The guide provides detailed promotional strategies, insightful personal testimony and plenty of other useful resources to help award winners and nominees best leverage and optimize their National Magazine Awards.

Click here to download the full PDF version.

Winners’ Circle Webinar

On November 25, 2015, the National Magazine Awards Foundation presented Winners’ Circle, an exclusive learning and networking event. More than 70 NMA winners and nominees gathered at The Spoke Club in Toronto’s King West district to meet, mingle, network and learn about how a National Magazine Award can be a boost to your career.

In addition to our Best Practices Guide, the NMAF has created this webinar to uncover other effective ways to leverage and optimize your National Magazine Award win. In a discussion led by D.B. Scott, three NMA winners–Penny Caldwell of Cottage Life, Matthew Blackett of Spacing and Katherine Laidlaw of The Walrus–share their best practices on how they leveraged their recognition of winning a National Magazine Award.

Please stay tuned for when we announce our next Winners’ Circle event.

Download this year’s National Magazine Awards Winners’ Seals here.

Watch other videos on our YouTube channel here.

Portrait Series: National Magazine Awards Storytellers

The National Magazine Awards Foundation is all about celebrating Canadian creators and storytellers. Our mission is to recognize excellence in magazine writing and art production.

At the NMAF we tip our hats to the storytellers who skilfully fill the pages of Canadian magazines. To highlight the hard work and meticulous crafting that goes into creating an NMA-winning piece we’ve produced a portrait series of this year’s winners and nominees, discussing what makes for great storytelling.

 

To learn more about the award winners and nominees from the 2016 awards program, please visit magazine-awards.com. You can also follow this photo series on Instagram (nationalmagazineawards) or by following us on Twitter @MagAwards.

Credit: photos taken by Steve Goetz; interviews conducted by Melissa Myers.

Full Coverage of the 39th National Magazine Awards
Complete articles of all nominees and winners
Complete list [pdf] of all nominees and winners
Full text of Kim Pittaway’s speech
Smash Reel
Thank You to our Sponsors & Partners
The Judges
Award Seals

Kim Pittaway’s impassioned Outstanding Achievement Award acceptance speech

At Friday evening’s 39th annual National Magazine Awards gala [read complete recap], Kim Pittaway received the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, acknowledging her long and distinguished career as a writer, editor, teacher and mentor in Canadian magazine journalism. Read Kim’s complete NMA bio.

On stage at Friday’s gala, Kim inspired a standing ovation from the audience of over 400 guests in attendance, affirming not only the Foundation’s decision to present Kim with this award but also the inspiration that Kim has been to so many of us in Canadian magazines.

Below, with her permission, we present Kim’s acceptance speech from the 39th annual National Magazine Awards gala.


Kim Pittaway: Thank you Beth, Rona and my other colleagues who nominated me, the Board of the NMAF and the friends and colleagues who have congratulated me following the announcement of this honour. I feel obliged to note that Joyce Byrne, President of the Foundation, called me with the news on April 1—April Fool’s Day. I chose to ignore that.

This is indeed an honour, especially as I review the list of those who have preceded me to the podium for the Outstanding Achievement Award. I’d like to begin my remarks by quoting one of them.

“It’s simple: We need each other.”

That’s how the late Catherine Keachie, then-president of the Canadian Magazine Publishers Association, described what she called the magazine publishing ecosystem. It was the early 1990s, and I was a 20-something writer, hired to help write position papers on split-run publishing, GST on magazines, the environmental impact of magazine publishing and more. It was a crash course in how the industry worked and Catherine was my instructor. Our best lines were crafted in conversation as she held forth passionately on why magazines were central to our national culture.

Catherine knew that it was essential for the industry to work together. The major publishers needed the cultural legitimacy of the small and literary publishers. The smalls and literaries needed the financial and political heft of the bigs. Sales and circulation teams needed strong editorial content to sell. Editorial teams needed the business support of those sales and circ teams to find their audiences and get their stories into readers’ homes and hands.

Magazines brands—on the page, online and in whatever other formats they may appear—are the products of many hands, an exciting mix of journalism, storytelling, sales, promotion, marketing and analysis, all geared to telling stories that will engage, delight and—at its best—challenge our audiences. And while all of us in this industry have a role in enabling that storytelling, at its centre are the creators: the writers, photographers and artists whose words and pictures speak to us, touch us, transform us, who tell our Canadian stories, celebrate our Canadian heroes and illuminate our Canadian perspectives—stories that are critical to our uniquely Canadian culture.

I can think of no other organization that I would rather be honoured by than the National Magazine Awards Foundation precisely because of the NMAF’s long focus on creators. The work I am proudest of hinges on creation: my own work as a writer, and my efforts to facilitate the creative work of others as an educator and editor.

After the announcement about this award was made, I joked with a colleague that the key to being nominated was to move away from Toronto—after a few years away, people forget what it was about you that irritated them. What I’m about to say may serve as a reminder.

Publishers and brands will inevitably tally up “their” wins tonight—a logical impulse, given that they provide the pages and the infrastructure to enable the sharing of those stories. But let’s be absolutely clear about why we are here tonight. We are here to celebrate the creators. We may call these the Mag Awards, but they are in fact the creators’ awards. Without the words, without the pictures, without the writers, photographers and illustrators, we’re not in the magazine business—we’re just peddling flyers. And we all know that as an industry where fees to writers, photographers and artists have not shifted appreciably in decades, a night that celebrates those creators, that thanks them for their efforts is, frankly, the least that we as an industry can do.

It’s simple, as Catherine told me. We need each other. And as we contemplate the way forward for our industry—and for this awards program—we would do well to remember that.

Thank you.

Kim Pittaway’s essay from the 39th NMA Gala Program

39th National Magazine Awards
Complete Gala Recap
Read Kim’s complete NMA bio
Press release: English | Français
Complete list [pdf] of all winners
Twitter highlights: @MagAwards | #NMA16
The Judges
Award Seals
La version française: magazine-prix.com

Photos by Steven Goetz.

Announcing the Winners of the 39th National Magazine Awards

It was a night to remember! The NMAF has announced the winners of the 39th annual National Magazine Awards, concluding an exciting evening celebrating Canadian creators at the Arcadian Court in Toronto–hosted by author Chris Turner–with more than 400 of Canada’s best writers, artists, editors, art directors, publishers and others in attendance. The NMAF presented Gold, Silver and Honourable Mention awards in 39 categories. More than $50,000 in cash prizes has been awarded to Canadian creators.

La version française: magazine-prix.com
Press release: English | Français
Complete list [pdf] of all winners
Twitter highlights: @MagAwards | #NMA16
The Judges
Award Seals
Read the complete articles of all nominees and winners

SPECIAL AWARDS

Magazine of the Year

Maisonneuve

Jennifer Varkonyi, Publisher
Haley Cullingham, Daniel Viola, Editors
Anna Minzhulina, Art Director
Published by Maisonneuve Magazine Association

Maisonneuve fulfills its bold mandate of “banishing boring,” clearly striving to engage, inform and inspire. From its refreshing and imaginative art direction to its passionate editorial voice, the magazine feels like its constantly evolving, yet at the same time seems to connect with a sense of familiarity with its readers.
National Magazine Awards jury


Best Magazine Brand
Ricardo


Best New Magazine Writer
Sponsored by Reader’s Digest Foundation
Desmond Cole
The Skin I’m In
Toronto Life


Best New Magazine Photographer
Marta Iwanek
The Maidan
Maisonneuve


Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement
Kim Pittaway

Renowned journalist, editor, teacher and mentor Kim Pittaway is the recipient of the 2016 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, recognizing career excellence and service to the Canadian magazine industry. For her enduring dedication to the Canadian magazine industry, for the principled leadership and mentorship that has impacted the careers of many, and for her unfailing support of magazine creators, the NMAF is proud to recognize Kim Pittaway with its highest individual honour.


AWARDS TABLE


INTEGRATED AWARDS – GOLD WINNERS

Best Single Issue
Sponsored by Rolland Enterprises, Inc

Sportsnet

John Intini, Editor
Brianne Collins, Art Director
What it’s like to be Connor McDavid right now
Sportsnet


 Best Magazine Cover
Sponsored by Ontario Media Development Corporation
Stephen Gregory, Art Director
Mark Stevenson, Editor
Hurry Up and Die, Already
Maclean’s


  Words & Pictures
Sponsored by CDS Global
Our Ever-Changing Moods
The Walrus
Jillian Tamaki
, Author & Illustrator
Jonathan Kay
, Editor
Brian Morgan
, Art Director


Single Service Article Package
VÉGÉ Inspiré
Ricardo
Brigitte Coutu, Editor
Caroline Blanchette, Art Director
Mélanie Roy, Émilie Folie-Boivin, Sarah Lalanne, Authors
David de Stefano, Photographer
Caroline Nault, Heidi Bronstein, Contributors


Infographics
David Chau, Creator
Craig Battle, Editor
GR!#K
Sportsnet


“The most important mission of the National Magazine Awards is to celebrate Canadian creators. And tonight we have reached a new milestone in recognizing and rewarding excellence to more than 300 nominees and 70 gold and silver winners at the 39th annual NMA gala. The National Magazine Awards are one of Canada’s most important cultural institutions, and even as we celebrate our 39th year we are looking forward to our 40th anniversary and beyond.”
Joyce Byrne, president of the NMAF


WRITING AWARDS – GOLD WINNERS

Arts & Entertainment
Drew Nelles
Howl
The Walrus

Best Short Feature
Hon Lu
Spirited Away
Toronto Life

Business
Valérie Borde
Le virage vert de la Chine
L’actualité

Columns
Sponsored by Impresa Communications Ltd.
Anne Kingston
Thank you, Margaret Wente, for exposing rape culture
Maclean’s

Editorial Package
Maclean’s Staff
The Space Issue
Maclean’s

Essays
Lisa Gregoire
Breathing Holes
Eighteen Bridges

Fiction
Presented by Ontario Arts Council
Russell Smith
Raccoons
CNQ: Canadian Notes & Queries

Health & Medicine
Alison Motluk
Worth the Risk
Maisonneuve

Humour
Jacob Pacey
Your Daily Life As A Failing Comedian
The Feathertale Review

Investigative Reporting
Virgil Grandfield
The Cage
Eighteen Bridges

One of a Kind
Richard Kelly Kemick
Playing God
The Walrus

Personal Journalism
Sasha Chapin
Dreams Are Boring
Hazlitt

Poetry
David McGimpsey
The High Road
Vallum

Politics & Public Interest
Alec Castonguay
Les partis politiques vous espionnent
L’actualité

Profiles
Marci McDonald
The Fixer
Toronto Life

Science, Technology & Environment
Philip Preville
It’s A Hard Knock Life
Cottage Life

Service: Family, Health & Personal Finance
Sarah Liss
The Shame Game
Chatelaine

Service: Lifestyle
Andrew Braithwaite
Canada’s Best New Restaurants 2015
Air Canada enRoute

Society
Carissa Halton
A Different Kind of Simakanis
Eighteen Bridges

Sports & Recreation
Jonathan Trudel
Laurent chez les grands
L’actualité

Travel
Isabelle Grégoire
Le vrai train du nord
L’actualité



VISUAL AWARDS – GOLD WINNERS

Art Direction of an Entire Issue
Sponsored by TC Transcontinental Printing
Domenic Macri
Fallout
Report on Business


Art Direction of a Single Article
Sponsored by The Office of Gilbert Li
Marcey Andrews
The Future of Everything
New Trail


Fashion
For my 10th birthday…
ELLE Canada
Owen Bruce
, Photographer
Brittany Eccles
, Art Director
Juliana Schiavinatto
, Stylist
Contributors: Denis Desro, Liisa Winkler, Stella Winkler, Juliann H, Hannah D, Sam F, Judith Maria Bradley, Susana Hong, Simone Otis, Suzanne Campos


Homes & Gardens
Martin Tessler, Photographer
Paul Roelofs, Art Director
Nicole Sjöstedt, Stylist
The Comeback
Western Living


Illustration
Sponsored by Very Good Studios
Adrian Forrow
My Prescribed Life
The Walrus


Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Sponsored by CNW Group
Marta Iwanek
The Maidan
Maisonneuve


Portrait Photography

Raina + Wilson
Future Perfect
Globe Style Advisor


Spot Illustration
Jay Dart
The Things He Carried
Globe Style Advisor


Still-Life Photography
Hudson Hayden
Butcher Crop
Globe Style Advisor


To view the complete list of Gold and Silver winners and Honourable Mentions, visit magazine-awards.com/39winners


ABOUT THE 39th ANNUAL NATIONAL MAGAZINE AWARDS
More than 400 members of the Canadian magazine industry—publishers, editors, art directors, writers, photographers, illustrators, circulators and more—joined esteemed sponsors and other guests at the Arcadian Court for the 39th annual National Magazine Awards gala, presented by CDS Global.

Special guests were in abundance at the 39th annual National Magazine Awards. Minister of Canadian Heritage Mélanie Joly delivered a tribute via video to the evening’s nominees and winners, acknowledging the important role of Canadian magazine creators in nurturing Canadian culture. Member of Parliament Adam Vaughan of Toronto attended and delivered a welcome message to the guests, celebrating the nominees in attendance. And Member of Parliament and Green Party Leader Elizabeth May, radio host Gillian Deacon and Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi each delivered messages via video congratulating the nominees and winners.

The NMAF was also honoured to welcome Carolyn Vesely of Ontario Arts Council, who presented the award for Fiction; Matt Hilliard-Forde of the Ontario Media Development Corporation, who presented the award for Magazine Covers; Natalie Turvey of the Canadian Journalism Foundation, who presented the award for Investigative Reporting; Karen Luttrell of the Professional Writers Association of Canada, who presented the award for Society; and Derek Finkle of the Canadian Writers Group, who presented the award for One of a Kind.

This year, 184 Canadian magazines from coast to coast to coast—English and French, print and digital—entered the best of their editorial and design to the National Magazine Awards, submitting the work of more than 3000 writers, editors, photographers, illustrators, art directors and other creators. The NMAF’s 232 volunteer judges nominated a total of 309 submissions from 84 different Canadian magazines for awards in 39 written, visual, integrated and special categories. A record 12 magazines were nominated for the first time. More than $50,000 in cash prizes has been awarded to Canadian creators.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The NMAF gratefully acknowledges the support its sponsors, partners and suppliers.

 

THANK YOU CHRIS TURNER!
The NMAF (and all guests of the National Magazine Awards) are grateful to Chris Turner for his wonderful performance tonight as host of the 39th National Magazine Awards!

Chris Turner is the author of five books and one of Canada’s leading writers and speakers on energy and sustainability. His bestsellers The Leap and The Geography of Hope were both National Business Book Award finalists. His most recent book is How to Breathe Underwater, an essay collection, which won the W.O. Mitchell City of Calgary Book Prize. His feature writing has won nine National Magazine Awards.

PHOTOS, VIDEOS, INTERVIEW & MORE
Check back next week for photos, videos and more from the 39th annual National Magazine Awards gala.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL MAGAZINE AWARDS FOUNDATION
The National Magazine Awards Foundation is a bilingual, not-for-profit institution whose mission is to foster, recognize and promote editorial excellence in Canadian publications. The annual awards are presented in June and are followed by a year-long national publicity effort and professional development opportunities. Our mandate is to support Canadian creators. Since 1977, the NMAF has helped build and sustain the careers of thousands of creators—the writers, editors, creative directors and visual artists who contribute to the vast ecosystem of Canadian culture. On June 9, the NMAF presented the first annual Digital Publishing Awards recognizing excellence in Canadian digital publications. Discover more at magazine-awards.com.

See you next year!

Author Chris Turner to host 2016 National Magazine Awards

The National Magazine Awards Foundation is pleased to announce that the Master of Ceremonies for the 39th annual National Magazine Awards gala will be renowned author and speaker Chris Turner. [TICKETS]
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“I’m giddily excited to get the opportunity to host this year’s National Magazine Awards. To win an NMA is one of the great honours in Canadian media, and to be able to hand them out to deserving creators will be such an honour and delight. Plus, as a freelancer and a western Canadian, I rarely get the chance to attend the country’s best magazine industry party — and this time I’m optimistic I’ll get a good seat!”
Chris Turner is the author of five books and one of Canada’s leading writers and speakers on energy and sustainability. His bestsellers The Leap and The Geography of Hope were both National Business Book Award finalists. His most recent book is How to Breathe Underwater, an essay collection, which won the W.O. Mitchell City of Calgary Book Prize. His feature writing has won nine National Magazine Awards. Turner was a 2013 Berton House writer-in-residence in Dawson City, Yukon, and a 2010 Paul D. Fleck Fellow at the Banff Centre. He lives in Calgary with his wife and two children. His book THE PATCH, the definitive story of Alberta’s oil sands, will be published in Canada and internationally by Simon & Schuster in 2017.
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Tickets are on sale now for the 39th annual National Magazine Awards gala, June 10, 2016 at the Arcadian Court in Toronto.
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The early-bird deadline for discounted ticket prices is Friday May 20. 
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En marge, avec Jean-François Proulx

JFProulxcroppedNP03-2

En juin dernier, à l’occasion du gala des Prix du magazine canadien, la récolte a été faste pour le magazine Nouveau Projet. En plus d’avoir décroché le prestigieux titre de Magazine de l’année, Nicolas Langelier et son équipe ont récolté deux médailles d’or, une médaille d’argent et trois mentions honorables, dont la médaille d’or pour la meilleure direction artistique d’un numéro (« Ce Canada dont nous ne voulons pas »).

Le jury a salué la vision du directeur artistique Jean-François Proulx en lui octroyant la plus haute distinction pour une catégorie visuelle. Depuis NP01, Jean-François Proulx fait équipe avec Nouveau Projet pour créer l’identité visuelle du magazine. La Fondation s’est entretenue avec lui afin d’en savoir davantage à propos de son parcours et de sa démarche artistique.

FPMC : Vous êtes le directeur artistique de Nouveau Projet, mais vous dirigez aussi Balistique, que vous décrivez comme étant un « studio de collaboration graphique à géométrie variable ». Pouvez-vous nous parler brièvement de votre cheminement professionnel et de la petite histoire de ce studio?

Jean-François Proulx : En 2016, Balistique célébrera ses 8 ans, dont 5 passées avec nos amis du magazine Nouveau Projet, depuis leurs débuts. C’est un désir d’indépendance combiné à un certain esprit d’entreprenariat qui m’a poussé à lancer ce studio, après avoir travaillé quelques années en agence, ici, dans le Vieux-Montréal.

Balistique n’est pas un studio au sens traditionnel. Pas de bureaux, de secrétaire ou de photocopieur. Seulement une équipe flexible créée sur mesure pour les besoins de chaque client, travaillant sous ma direction artistique (branding, édition, web, applications mobiles). Les méthodes contemporaines de travail changent, et la mobilité est maintenant un atout pour les entreprises créatives qui peuvent collaborer avec différentes personnes, dans un processus organique.

Depuis 2008, nous travaillons particulièrement avec des organisations dans les milieux culturels et corporatifs. Et cette année marquera aussi le lancement d’un projet parallèle d’entreprise avec la conception et l’édition d’une application mobile (plus de détails à venir).

FPMC : Vous réalisez divers projets sous la bannière Balistique : conception graphique de logos, de jaquettes de livres, de programmes, d’affiches. En quoi votre approche diffère-t-elle selon le projet que vous abordez? Plus spécifiquement, quel est le processus de création en ce qui concerne Nouveau Projet?

JFP : Chaque projet est unique et nécessite une approche différente. Balistique s’entoure de collaborateurs talentueux qui sauront mener chaque projet à bon port. Dans le cas du magazine Nouveau Projet, nous travaillons à proximité de l’équipe éditoriale. Assez tôt dans le processus (jusqu’à 6 mois avant l’envoi du magazine à l’imprimeur) nous organisons des rencontres de production hebdomadaires, qui nous permettent de bien planifier la création visuelle du magazine, à mesure que la direction des textes se précise.

Ensuite, je rédige un brief créatif précis pour commander les oeuvres et photos qui illustreront le magazine. L’apport des collaborateurs est évidemment toujours apprécié et encouragé. Enfin, comme pour chaque projet d’envergure, la production se termine par un mois de production et d’échanges de toutes sortes, entre l’équipe créative et la rédaction. Ces jours-ci, nous travaillons d’ailleurs à la conception du prochain numéro du printemps-été 2016.

FPMC : En page couverture du numéro « Ce Canada dont nous ne voulons pas », pour lequel vous avez reçu la médaille d’or, le portrait de David Suzuki donne spontanément envie aux lecteurs de parcourir le magazine. L’utilisation de la lumière donne l’impression de plonger au cœur des préoccupations du scientifique. L’effet est vraiment saisissant. Pouvez-vous nous parler de la création de cette page couverture et de votre collaboration avec la photographe Dominique Lafond?

JFP: Je pense que cette couverture est toute spéciale pour le magazine. Elle marque l’entrée de Nouveau Projet dans la sphère des grands magazines de société. La couverture a été réfléchie ici, mais c’est à Toronto que nous avons dû rencontrer monsieur Suzuki. Son horaire est extrêmement chargé, et il n’était malheureusement pas disponible pour une visite à Montréal. Dominique Lafond et son équipe (Rodéo Productions) ont réussi à organiser une séance éclair à Toronto. Et quelle rencontre ça a été!

Monsieur Suzuki est un grand homme qui possède une impressionnante expérience. Il était tellement bavard que nous devions parfois l’interrompre pour prendre les photos.

FPMC : Pourquoi avoir choisi le rouge pour le titre du magazine sur cette page couverture, plutôt que le blanc, utilisé ailleurs? Ce choix semble aussi en rupture avec les numéros précédents.

JFP: L’optimisme habituel des couvertures de Nouveau Projet a été légèrement revu pour ce numéro. Le dossier central touche un sujet assez grave, soit la disparition d’une certaine idée du Canada, autrefois perçu comme une nation progressiste. Le rouge semblait la couleur idéale pour illustrer ce sujet important.

FPMC : D’une couverture à l’autre du magazine, le texte alterne entre le noir et l’orange, ce qui rend la lecture plus conviviale tout en mettant en valeur certains passages. Le style est sobre, et la couleur est utilisée parcimonieusement. En quoi ces choix reflètent-ils l’identité visuelle que vous désiriez conférer au magazine?

JFP : Nouveau Projet est un espace de lecture et de réflexion. Sans être brutalement minimaliste, la signature visuelle du magazine favorise une certaine élégance et invite les lecteurs à prendre leur temps (dans la lecture, la réflexion et même dans la vie en général). On s’éloigne aussi de la signature des créations éphémères à la mode (puisqu’elles ne survivent pas toujours à l’épreuve du temps).

FPMC : Depuis l’ouverture de votre studio en 2008, la qualité de votre travail a été saluée à maintes reprises. Aux Prix du magazine canadien en particulier, vous avez remporté cette année la médaille d’or pour la direction artistique d’un numéro, et étiez finaliste dans cette même catégorie en 2014. Quel impact ces distinctions ont-elles eu sur votre carrière?

JFP : Malgré une importance démesurée accordée par l’industrie (et surtout les jeunes designers), les distinctions en design ne changent pas le monde et ne prédisent pas le succès ou l’échec d’une carrière en design graphique. Je préfère toujours réfléchir avec une certaine humilité: je pense qu’un prix en design est surtout une précieuse occasion de remercier le client qui nous a fait confiance, et féliciter l’équipe qui travaille derrière le projet gagnant. On pense immédiatement à l’équipe de création, mais n’oublions jamais le travail passionné de tous les acteurs qui font qu’un magazine de qualité peut voir le jour.

En savoir plus : nouveauprojet.com

Plus en marge
Isabelle Arsenault
Catherine Dubé
Dominique Forget
Tous

Photo par Dominique Lafond

Off the Page, with Dan Rubinstein

DanRubinstein
Dan Rubinstein (photo by Lisa Gregoire)

This week on Off the Page, our interview series with National Magazine Award winners, we chat with author and NMA-winning journalist Dan Rubinstein, whose 2015 book Born to Walk emerged from a National Magazine Award-nominated story in The Walrus.

NMAF: Congratulations on the recent publication of your book Born to Walk: The Transformative Power of a Pedestrian Act (ECW Press). You’re a self-described obsessive walker, meditating on the many benefits walking offers. How did your obsession with walking begin?

Born to WalkDan Rubinstein: I’ve always been interested in walking, both for fun and as a way to get from A to B. I like how the act allows me to intimately explore places or routes we typically don’t experience on foot. You never know what you’ll see or who you’ll meet, and you gain a deeper sense of how you fit into the natural and human ecosystem in which you live.

But this interest became an obsession in 2012. My “dream job,” as a magazine editor, had become a nightmare, and the long lunch-hour runs I took to escape the stress led to a blown knee. So I started going for walks at lunch, which offered a similar physical and psychological release.

And when I was back at my desk, I kept stumbling over news stories and research studies online that spoke to the many curative properties of walking, from physical and mental health to social cohesion and economic sustainability. I was hooked!

NMAF: Your article “The Walking Cure” — published in The Walrus and winner of two National Magazine Honourable Mentions in 2013 in the categories Society and Health & Medicine — seems to be the starting seed for Born to Walk. Can you talk a bit about the expansion of the article and the development of the book?

Dan Rubinstein: One of the first conversations I had about the myriad benefits of walking was with Stanley Vollant, the medical doctor at the heart of the “The Walking Cure.” He’s an Innu from eastern Quebec — the province’s first aboriginal surgeon — and had started a multi-year walking project, a series of group treks between First Nations communities in which dozens of participants experience the power of this healthy activity and re-establish connections to the land and to one another.

Stanley’s walks are hundreds of kilometres long, often in the winter, and people realize that the only way to reach the end of such a daunting journey is to approach it one step at a time — and they realize if they can do this, they can attempt to overcome any challenges they face. Stanley had the vision that inspired him to begin this project while doing the Camino de Santiago pilgrimage in Spain.

He didn’t know why he had to start walking with aboriginal youth and elders in Canada, but as he told me when we first spoke, “When you begin a journey, you don’t know why. The trail will show you the way.”

Writing this article was a natural first step for me, and expanded into the opening chapter of my book, it establishes the main themes and sets the tone. It also introduces Stanley, a recurring voice of wisdom in the book.

Read "The Walking Cure" (The Walrus)
Read “The Walking Cure” (The Walrus)

NMAF: Walking clearly influences the content of your writing, but does it influence how you write? Does the physical endurance built by walking long distances transfer to the long-term focus and dedication one needs to complete a book? Moreover, has walking influenced the form or pace of your writing?

Dan Rubinstein: I find it easier to walk for hours and hours than to sit and write for hours and hours. Walking is invigorating and inspiring — writing, for me, is hard work. But I did keep reminding myself, while working on the book, to take a “one step at a time” approach.

And the book, like many great walks, is a meandering journey, with a lot of side trails, that ultimately leads to a satisfying conclusion. At least I hope it does for readers.

NMAF: Do you have a familiar, favourite walk? Where is the strangest place walking has led you?

Dan Rubinstein: I don’t really have a specific favourite walk. I like walking from the place I am to the place I have to be. I like utilitarian transects that force me to go somewhere unexpected — say, an industrial park, or a subdivision that’s still under construction.

When I lived in Edmonton, I loved walking along the Athabasca River in Jasper National Park, or along the North Saskatchewan River in the city’s river valley. In Ottawa, where I now live, there are some beautiful trails along the Rideau River or in nearby Gatineau Park.

But really, I prefer the more unusual places where I’ve walked, such as the four-day hike I did from my parents’ house in Toronto to their cottage near Algonquin Provincial Park (which became an article for Cottage Life).

You don’t have to travel somewhere exotic to have a profound experience. You can literally walk out the front door and keep going.

NMAF: Since 2003, you’ve won a number of National Magazine Awards for work published in a variety of magazines (The Walrus, Canadian Geographic, Western Living, and Alberta Views). What is the role of magazine work — and magazine award nominations and wins — in the life of a freelancer?

Dan Rubinstein: Magazine assignments help freelancers explore ideas that they’re curious and passionate about. I’ve written about walking, for instance, in a dozen different publications.

This is the fun part of a freelancer’s life. Other gigs, like communications work, help beef up your income, but it’s the magazine assignments that provide the freedom that makes it all worthwhile. And if you write a story that wins an award, that makes it easier to pitch ideas to editors you haven’t worked with before.

Awards and nominations are a good calling card. They can help get you in the door. But at the end of the day, they’re not why most of us do this. It’s the stories that matter.


Dan Rubinstein is a National Magazine Award-winning journalist and author of Born to Walk: The Transformative Power of a Pedestrian Act (ECW Press). Read more about the project at borntowalk.org/about/. Follow Dan on Twitter @dan_rube

Very special thanks to Leah Edwards for researching and conducting this interview with Dan. 

The 2016 National Magazine Awards are now open for submissions until January 15. Awards will be presented in 39 categories at the 39th annual NMA gala on June 9. Digital publications and magazine content can also enter the Digital Publishing Awards (deadline Feb 16).

More “Off the Page” interviews with award-winning writers
Heather O’Neill, author of Lullabies for Little Criminals
Emily Urquhart
, author of Beyond the Pale
Arno Kopecky, author of The Oilman and the Sea
Joshua Knelman, author of Hot Art