Mag of the Year Corporate Knights prints on wheat straw

Canada’s reigning Magazine of the Year Corporate Knights is not resting on its laurels. According to a story in Masthead Online, the magazine’s latest issue is printed on 60% wheat straw “paper,” which its editor Tyler Hamilton says may be a more sustainable product to meet printing needs in the future.

The latest issue of the magazine features American actor and entrepreneur Woody Harrelson, one of the founders of Manitoba-based Prairie Paper Ventures, which produces the wheat straw stock.

Read the story over at Masthead Online.

Related post:
Get to know Corporate Knights, Canada’s Magazine of the Year

Off the Page, with journalist and blogger Julia Belluz

Off the Page appears regularly on the Magazine Awards blog. Today we catch up with Julia Belluz, whose blog–Science-ish–published by Maclean’s, won gold in the inaugural National Magazine Award for Best Blog earlier this year.

NMAF: Tell us a bit about Science-ish, what you consider its publishing niche to be, and who your readers are.

Julia Belluz (Photo: Jessica Darmanin)

Julia: Coffee is good for your health! Coffee is bad for your health! Vitamin D will save your life! Vitamin D will kill you quicker! I created Science-ish in response to bewildering and contradictory claims like these that float around in the popular discourse.

This confusion doesn’t end with individual health choices. Politicians frequently make assertions about health that aren’t necessarily informed by evidence, as do journalists, celebrities, and anyone who thinks they can get away with it.

So the blog is a sane place where readers can learn about the actual science behind the headlines. My readers tend to be doctors, nurses, students, policy wonks, researchers, and anyone who is concerned about health and science.  Continue reading

Award-winning online magazine Hazlitt moves into print

The most decorated online magazine at this year’s National Magazine Awards is publishing a print product. Hazlitt, winner of 3 Gold National Magazine Awards–including the prestigious Magazine Website of the Year–at the 2012 NMA gala this past June, announced this week that it is launching a print edition.

Hazlitt No. 1 (Winter 2014) will be on magazine racks this month and, completing a full circle, will also have an electronic version. According to the publisher, Random House Canada, Hazlitt No. 1 collects some of the greatest hits and seminal tracks previously published on the website alongside newly commissioned work.

Launched as an online magazine in August 2012, Hazlitt won the National Magazine Awards for Best Magazine Website Design and Best Online Video, in addition to Magazine Website of the Year, at the 36th annual NMA gala this past June, its first year of eligibility.

The new print title features work by National Magazine Award winners and nominees Lynn Crosbie, Michael Winter, Billie Livingston, Sarah Nicole Prickett, Alexandra Molotkow and more.

Read Hazlitt’s press release.

More:
Meet the Finalists for Magazine Website of the Year
Meet the Finalists for Best Online Video

Key dates for the 37th annual National Magazine Awards

At the National Magazine Awards Foundation we are getting very excited about the upcoming year, our 37th recognizing and rewarding the very best in Canadian magazines. We’ll be announcing our call for entries next week. Here are the important dates for the coming year:

Dec 1: Call for Entries
Jan 7: Co-Financing Deadline
Jan 10: Early Bird Submissions Deadline
Jan 15: Final Submissions Deadline
May 1: Nominations Announcement
Jun 6: 37th National Magazine Awards Gala
.
As always, there are many ways to keep current with news and updates from the National Magazine Awards: sign up for our e-newsletter; follow us on Twitter at @MagAwards; and come back and visit this blog often.
.
More information about this year’s National Magazine Awards will be posted here later this week and next.

Off the Page, with Sierra Skye Gemma

 

Sierra Skye Gemma (Photo: Nadya Kwandibens)

Off the Page appears regularly on the Magazine Awards blog. Today we catch up with Sierra Skye Gemma, winner of the 2012 National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Writer.

NMAF: Earlier this year you won the National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Writer for a story called “The Wrong Way” (The New Quarterly), a personal essay and critical meditation on the stages of grief. Tell us a bit about how you developed this story and why you decided to submit it in the annual non-fiction writing competition from TNQ?

Sierra: The Wrong Way came out of an assignment in a Creative Non-fiction course with Andreas Schroeder. I had never written a personal essay before and when I started I wasn’t even sure what I wanted to say. Not exactly, anyway. I looked up Kübler-Ross’s Five Stages of Grief because I thought it would explain my experiences. I thought I could structure my essay according to the stages, but I realized that Kübler-Ross’s theory didn’t apply to my life at all. My essay then developed as a sort of antagonistic call-and-response with conventional grief theories.

I sat and wrote it in two sittings, straight through from beginning to end. I didn’t move things around after that and I barely edited it. That said, I had bits and pieces of it already written. Little vignettes that I hadn’t known what to do with before, like the story of buying my son the fish and aquatic frog. I had also taken extensive notes when my sister died and I wrote down lots of dialogue. Maybe that sounds weird; maybe not, if you’re a writer. But what do you do with a short “scene” between siblings that, when read on its own, seems to make light of the death of another sibling? Well, I guess you build an elaborate home in which it can live. The Wrong Way was that home for many of my disjointed experiences with grief.

I submitted the essay to The New Quarterly’s Edna Staebler Personal Essay Contest because Andreas Schroeder told me to submit it to a contest (and not through the slush pile of regular submissions); he thought the essay was good enough to win. The New Quarterly’s personal essay contest seemed like the obvious choice. The lesson here? Always listen to Andreas Schroeder.  Continue reading

New exhibit from NMA-winning photographer Mark Peckmezian

A new solo exhibition by National Magazine Award-winning photographer Mark Peckmezian is set to open on Friday, November 22 at the O’Born Contemporary gallery in Toronto.

The Canadian photographer, now based in New York, won the Gold National Magazine Award last year in Portrait Photography, for “Never Left Art School” (a series with Douglas Coupland) in Montecristo magazine. He was previously a finalist for the Best New Visual Creator award in 2010, for “A Man Called Cope” (Report on Business).

The exhibition, “Pictures,” is on display until December 21.

From the O’Born Contemporary site: Working within portraiture and documentary photography, Peckmezian attempts to leverage the analog-digital divide, producing work that draws into relief the enduring value of analog processes in our new digital-dominated photographic landscape. He recently completed his BFA in Photography from Ryerson University in Toronto, and is represented for commercial and editorial work by Stash. His photographs have been published in Prefix Photo, on the cover of Report on Business and Function, and have been selected for inclusion in Flash Forward, touring internationally.

More: Mark Peckmezian in the NMA Archive

Several NMA laureates among Writers’ Trust Prize finalists

Invite-HeaderTomorrow the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize will be announced at a ceremony in Toronto. The five shortlisted novelists and short-story writers are among Canada’s most celebrated authors, and four of them are previously National Magazine Award honorees:

  • Lynn Coady, a Writers’ Trust finalist (and winner of the Giller Prize) for Hellgoing, is a five-time National Magazine Award finalist, most recently in 2012 for two stories, “Publish then Perish” (Eighteen Bridges) and “Dogs in Clothes” (Canadian Notes & Queries); the latter is one of the stories included in Hellgoing.
  • Lisa Moore, shortlisted for Caught, is a two-time National Magazine Award finalist, most recently for “Notes from Newfoundland” (2011, The Walrus).
  • Cary Fagan, shortlisted for A Bird’s Eye, was nominated for a National Magazine Award for fiction in 2007, for his story “Shit Box” (Taddle Creek).
  • Krista Bridge, shortlisted for The Eliot Girls, was nominated for a National Magazine Award for fiction in 2002, for “Crusade” (Toronto Life).

The fifth Writers’ Trust finalist is Colin McAdam, for A Beautiful Truth, which was also shortlisted for a Governor General’s Literary Award earlier this year.

The winner will be revealed on Wednesday, November 20 at the annual Writers’ Trust Awards at Toronto’s Glenn Gould Studio, which also includes the Journey Prize for Short Fiction.

The 3 finalists for this year’s Journey Prize include Eliza Robertson, whose entry “My Sister Sang” (Grain magazine) was a finalist for this past year’s National Magazine Award for fiction.

The other two finalists are Doretta Lau (“How Does a Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun?”; Event magazine) and Naben Ruthnam (“Cinema Rex”; The Malahat Review).

More information about the Writers’ Trust Awards.