Tag Archive | Magazine Covers

Canadian Cover Awards open for submissions until Jan 31

The annual Canadian Cover Awards, produced by CMC and Magazines Canada, is accepting submissions until January 31 for its 2013 awards.

There are eight categories this year, including Newsstand Marketer of the Year. Last year’s winner of that award, Greg Kielty, highlighted a successful 2012 awards for SkyNews magazine.

Submissions are open to Canadian magazines that were distributed on newsstands between September 2012 and September 2013, and are sales-final. Submissions must be accompanied by distribution verification.

This year’s awards ceremony will once again be held at the Courtyard Toronto Downtown at 6 pm on February 25, 2014.

Redesigns for the new issues of Vancouver & Reader’s Digest

Two National Magazine Award-winning titles with a combined 114 years of publishing have unveiled redesigns this month.

Vancouver Magazine, owned by TC Media, debuted a new style for its Jan/Feb 2014 issue.

Most notably, the rounded font with the drop shadow, prominent in the old design (including this cover nominated for a National Magazine Award last year) has been replaced with a sleeker serif design. As for what’s new on the inside, read up on the details of the new VanMag at the Canadian Magazines blog.

And Canada’s Reader’s Digest also has a new look for February 2014.

The new print redesign follows up on the digital redesigns for RD and its French counterpart, Sélection, from last fall. And not just the cover has changed (though note the new miniscule ‘d’ in “digest,” quite a departure from the old design in which that word was the more prominent part of the title). Editor Robert Goyette told Canadian Magazines,

We asked what you liked best about Reader’s Digest and we’re happy to unveil a makeover to enhance your reading experience. From a new logo that emphasizes the “Reader” to an expanded selection of stories, this redesign is tailored to the people who told us they love our content and want more of it.

More:
Reader’s Digest and Vancouver Magazine the NMA Archive
More blog coverage of Magazine Covers & Redesigns

Off the Page, with The Feathertale Review editor Brett Popplewell

Off the Page is an interview series that appears regularly on the Magazine Awards blog. Today we catch up with Brett Popplewell, editor of The Feathertale Review, winner of the 2012 National Magazine Award for Best Single Issue.

NMAF: The Feathertale Review has been dubbed the “illegitimate love child of Mad Magazine and The New Yorker.” We just saw your latest issue, no. 11, double in size to 128 pages. Is this a signal to readers that the child is growing up? And if so, where is it headed?

Brett Popplewell: It’s definitely a sign that the child is growing up. Where it’s heading, I have no idea.

Truth is our entire team has grown up since our launch in 2006. We were just kids back then who felt there was an absence of high- and low-brow humour magazines in the Canadian market and thought we could be the cork to plug that hole. Lee Wilson, Feathertale’s co-founder and art director, and I wanted to create something that would feel fresh and cutting edge but that would hark back to an age when magazines leaned entirely on illustration to bring their words to life. We’re the ones who started calling our creation the “illegitimate love child of Mad Magazine and The New Yorker” because it felt like the best way to describe it.

The Feathertale Review, Issue no. 1

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 1

We really started to grow up with our fourth issue (summer 2009). I finally started writing editorials to help nail a raison-d’etre for each issue and we began interviewing interesting people (David Rakoff, Stuart McLean, Patrick deWitt, Lynn Coady, etc.) in the magazine, using those interviews to try to answer some of life’s greatest questions, like: “What does it actually mean to be funny?” All of this added a creative depth to what we were doing.

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 4

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 4

That adolescent stage carried on until our ninth issue (Spring of 2012), which was later named Best Single Issue by the National Magazine Awards Foundation.

By that point Lee and I were both working fulltime with mass-market magazines and had a much better understanding of our industry and Feathertale’s place within it. We began wanting to use Feathertale to challenge what we and others thought a magazine actually was. That’s how we came up with the idea for Feathertale 9. That issue, which looked, read and felt like it was lost in time, was modeled after 250-year-old magazines in order to show readers how far magazines had evolved and changed since their initial creation back in 1731. I think the moment we started thinking about Feathertale on such a bold scale was when it grew up and became more than just the bastard love child of Mad Magazine and The New Yorker.

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 9

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 9, winner of Best Single Issue at the 2012 National Magazine Awards

We didn’t have it in us to make Feathertale 10 as crazy an innovation as its predecessor. So we sought instead to create a “swan song” issue that resembled some of our earlier issues and served to book-end a chapter of our lives.

After Feathertale 10 we had time to reflect on what we’d accomplished and assess what we thought was working and what wasn’t. We had contemplated ending the print product and concentrating on Feathertale.com, the online companion to the Review. Our $10 cover price hadn’t been doing us any favours on newsstands and our online readership had always outstripped our printed circulation. But we still believed in producing beautiful printed products and decided to double down on that belief. That’s when we started thinking about making the Review look less like a magazine and more like a book.

From a design standpoint, this made sense. We were starting to publish some much longer stories and Lee felt the long features would read better if we changed the design. So we shrunk the page size from the 8”x10” we’d been using for the first 10 issues to 5”x8”. We then doubled the length of the book to make sure it would still pack the roughly 35,000 words we’d been publishing in our previous issues. In the end, the adjustment made good business sense as well.

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 11

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 11

Feathertale is still a magazine of course, but our current issue (and our next one for that matter) does look a lot more like a book than a mag. I don’t know how that format will serve us on newsstands. We have one of the thicker spines out there right now, and I think we’ve got some pretty appealing covers but we don’t take up nearly as much space on the magazine rack. That said, our subscribers seem to be enjoying the new forma, which is encouraging. It’s also substantially cheaper for us to print the smaller layout and from what we’ve seen at festivals, people are more inclined to pay $10 (or even $15) for the new format. We’re under no pretense of being the first to come out at this size, but so far it makes sense for us.

NMAF: In addition to winning the National Magazine Award for Best Single Issue (for issue no. 9), Feathertale has also won NMAs for Humour and for Best Magazine Cover; remarkable achievements for any magazine, no less a young literary one. What impact have achievements like these made on Feathertale and its writers and artists?

Brett: The accolades have certainly helped us stay motivated, but this has never been a vanity project. Our first win for Best Magazine Cover of 2010 came as a shock, both to us and I think to others in our industry. That cover was really special to us. It was illustrated by a young artist in Oshawa named Dani Crosby. She had just graduated from Sheridan and didn’t have a huge portfolio when we handed her our magazine and told her to do as she pleased with it. There aren’t many magazines that will hand over that kind of opportunity to such a young and relatively inexperienced artist. When we won best cover, we were really just humbled and honoured to be recognized by our peers.

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 6, winner of Best Magazine Cover, 2010 National Magazine Awards

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 6, winner of Best Magazine Cover, 2010 National Magazine Awards

After our first NMA a lot of illustrators and writers who hadn’t really been looking at us started submitting work our way. It definitely helped us grow and added some more established voices to our ever-expanding list of contributors. I guess you could say that award helped us beef up subsequent issues, including Feathertale 9, which won Gold for Best Single Issue last year. I was surprised when we were nominated for that award as well and I was ecstatic when we won. I think what I’m most proud of about that issue is that we pulled it all together on a $7,000 budget. I can’t really explain how it feels to have published and edited a magazine on that kind of budget and then see it nominated alongside magazines that are easily 100 times our size.

Feathertale was probably the smallest magazine nominated for any awards last year, so to win one of the evening’s most prestigious was an unexpected honour, something Cathal Kelly (one of our frequent contributors) touched on when he tweeted that watching Feathertale win that NMA was, financially speaking, “like your home movies winning an Oscar.”

There were 37 contributors in that issue and each of them was integral to its success. I can’t speak for any of them, but I can say that I am extremely proud to have worked with each of them on that issue. I’m equally as proud of Cathal for picking up silver in the Humour category last year. We’ve always said we’re a humour magazine, and Cathal’s award and work helped validate that claim. He’s probably the most naturally gifted writer I’ve had the privilege to work with.

"Feathertale Man rewrites history..." Silver, Humour, 2012 National Magazine Awards

“Feathertale Man rewrites history…” Silver, Humour, 2012 National Magazine Awards

NMAF: You’ve spoken elsewhere about the early success story of Feathertale, where start-up funds from a successful anti-bullying comic-book venture seeded the start of the magazine, and support from Canadian arts funding has helped you grow. What lessons have you learned about publishing a literary magazine in Canada that might benefit other publishers, writers and artists out there?

Brett: The biggest lesson I’ve learned is you have to believe in the value of what you’re doing because you won’t necessarily see any benefit from your labours in your bank account. Canada is such a small market that it’s very hard to make a profit with this type of venture. Financially, Feathertale is subsidized by grant money and sales of Lee’s and my anti-bullying comic books. But aside from that, this whole thing survives on the passion of its creators. That passion comes and goes. There are times when each of us have wanted to run away from Feathertale but the longer we spend working on the project the more we realize that it’s like a child that deserves a shot at growing up and becoming a fully functioning adult. It has definitely grown up and matured, but it’s still not ready to feed itself or change its own diapers.

Publishing, especially in the 21st century, is a very fickle industry. Lee and I wandered into it without any real experience. We had some spectacular success early on with our anti-bullying comic books and have no regrets at having used that success to launch The Feathertale Review. We are fortunate to now have support from both the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council. I think it’s important for every Canadian to understand that if the Arts councils ever pulled out of funding literary journals in this country the entire industry would likely die, or at least cease to print.

NMAF: Who is D’Artagnan, really?

Brett: He’s the real brains behind this operation. The one who makes all this possible.

Seriously though, he’s the blue monkey who appears on all things Feathertale. We used to think of him as our Alfred E. Newman or Eustace Tilley, but he’s become more than that. He’s our face in this world. What’s his story? Why is he blue? We’ve been asking ourselves those questions for a long time now but still haven’t figured it out.

Brett Popplewell is the editor of The Feathertale Review, as well as a National Magazine Award-winning writer — he won Gold in the category Sports & Recreation at the 2011 National Magazine Awards for “The Team that Disappeared” (Sportsnet). Follow him on Twitter @b_popps.

Images courtesy Feathertale.com and National Magazine Awards Foundation.

Submissions are now being accepted for the 2013 National Magazine Awards. Deadline for entries: January 15.

A Celebration of Covers: Spacing’s 10th anniversary

Marking the tenth anniversary of the popular and award-winning Spacing–the magazine devoted to Canadian urban issues–founder and art director Matthew Blackett tells the story behind ten of the most popular covers in Spacing‘s history. Among the group is the above issue, with cover photography by Stephen Rothlisberger, which won the 2005 Gold National Magazine Award for Editorial Package.

Canada’s 2013 National Magazine Awards are open for submissions, and among 48 categories for achievement in magazine writing, photography, illustration, packaging and digital content creation is the celebrated category for best Magazine Cover. Check out the NMA archives for past winners. The deadline for entries is January 15.

Going for Gold: How to win a National Magazine Award

At last June’s MagNet magazines conference in Toronto, a golden panel of industry experts gathered to present a session called “Going for Gold: How to Create Award-Winning Content,” moderated by Deborah Rosser, president of Rosser & Associates.

The panellists were:

  • Carole Beaulieu, publisher and editor-in-chief of L’actualité, winner of more than 50 National Magazine Awards since she became EIC in 1998;
  • Sarah Fulford, editor-in-chief of Toronto Life, the most-nominated magazine at last year’s NMAs and former winner of Magazine of the Year (2007);
  • David Hayes, freelance writer (nominated for 14 NMAs during his career, winning a gold and a silver award) and member of the board of directors of the National Magazine Awards Foundation (NMAF);
  • Domenic Macri, art director at Report on Business and winner of 6 NMAs for his design and creative direction;
  • Patrick Walsh, editor-in-chief and brand manager of Outdoor Canada, winner of 21 National Magazine Awards since 1987, and former president of the NMAF.

Risk and Reward: The moderator began by asking each of the panellists to present the story of a challenging piece that won a National Magazine Award, and what lessons they took from the experience.

2008_torontolife2Sarah Fulford spoke about how breaking the rules helped Toronto Life to a surprise NMA win for best magazine cover of 2008. Sarah said she and her then art director Jessica Rose, whom she hired with this specific challenge in mind, took big risks on a cover about gun violence in Toronto, as they bucked the conventions for cover design with small cover lines and other elements reflecting thinking outside the box. The issue sold well on the newsstand and also impressed the NMA judges that year, as they gave it a Gold.

Domenic Macri spoke in a similar vein about a magazine cover that won Gold the following year, 2009, at the NMAs. The Julie Dickson cover presented a challenge because the editors had agreed not to put her portrait on the magazine cover. Domenic showed the audience several of his drafts and mockups that he went through on his way to finally developing the final cover, saying that what he learned from the experience was although there are certain elements required of a good cover, “you don’t have to take the same approach all the time. I think we won the award because we came up with new directions, and because of the words.”

David Hayes mentioned an episode from 1990 when a feature story he’d written for Toronto Life wasn’t entered for an NMA that year, and after talking with his editor, who said he wasn’t able to enter the piece that year due to budget constraints, he learned that he could enter the NMAs himself. Several years later he took that experience to heart when he again discovered that an editor wouldn’t enter his story, so he entered it himself and it ended up winning Gold. “You never know what the jury will decide,” he reminded the audience, “so as a writer if you are proud of your work you should enter it.”

Patrick Walsh described the story of a controversial article he commissioned about the death of a hunter in Newfoundland, called “Another Fine Day Afield.” As an editor he felt that the story hadn’t been covered well in other media, and though it would be a legal, financial and editorial challenge to pursue the story for Outdoor Canada, he decided to take the risk. The risk paid off when the magazine story he published was picked up by CBC’s The Fifth Estate and NBC’s Inside Edition, and his writer Charles Wilkins won a Gold National Magazine Award in Sports & Recreation.

Carole Beaulieu also touted the benefits of taking risks and believing in the work you produce. She talked about a piece from last year she commissioned from a writer about Pauline Marois. Although Quebec news had been saturated with stories about the premier, Carole felt there was room for more if they could find the right angle and give it the right depth. She sent her writer to spend time with Mdm Marois at her hairdresser’s, achieving a kind of intimate portrait not yet seen, and L’actualité created a newsprint insert–what it is now calling a “mini-book” and making a semi-regular feature for the magazine–to accommodate the 16-page story. And at this year’s NMAs, “L’éttoffe d’un premier ministre,” by journalist Noémi Mercier, won Gold in Profiles.

Quote-Unquote: On the significance of winning a National Magazine Award and why we strive for award-winning content.

Sarah: “An award is useful for communicating to our stakeholders that we are successful. It adds momentum to what we do every day at the magazine… We create content to satisfy our readers, not to win awards. But it is our creators who get the awards and the cash prize, and for an editor, that’s an honour.”

David: “As writers, what we have is our reputation, and what we create should stand on its own. Awards are a feather in your cap, not the cap itself.”

Patrick: “We won because the story was beautifully written, because it was longform [5000 words]… We also took risks and winning the award was a measure of that.”

Carole: “I think we should always believe in what we do. Successful magazine stories have that ‘wow’ factor, and with everything we do we try to achieve that. You know that story matters, that content matters. If you believe you achieved success then you should enter, because then you’ll know if your peers [the jury] agree; that it made them say, ‘wow.’”

The Bottom Line: The moderator asked each panellist to distill one piece of advice for winning a National Magazine Award.

Domenic: Strive for strong collaboration between editorial and art in creating your content. Success is a product of a strong team.

Carole: Don’t take things too seriously. Trust your instincts and never give up on a great story.

Sarah: The most successful pieces are the ones where the creators were passionate and took risks.

Patrick: Be strategic, because the more you enter the more you are likely to win. If your aim is to win awards then enter as much as you can.

David: Advice to writers: write well. And advice to editors: hire writers who write well.

In Summary: Accept challenges, take risks, think differently, be passionate, find (or be) the best creator, work together, never give up on a good story, believe in your work and enter as much as you can. That, and always strive for the ‘wow’ factor! 

On behalf of the Canadian magazine industry, thank you to the panellists for sharing your wisdom.

Related posts:
Off the Page, with Patrick Walsh
National Magazine Award-winning Covers, 2007-2010
Winners of the 36th National Magazine Awards

More:
Award-winning work in the National Magazine Awards archive
National Magazine Awards digital Gold Book (free)

A Brief History of Magazines in First Covers

Ernest Hemingway wrote a story for the inaugural issue of Esquire in 1933. The debut of Rolling Stone in ’67 featured John Lennon in military garb. Gracing the first cover of People in 1974 was Mia Farrow, promoting her new film “The Great Gatsby” (deja vu?).

Recently the blog at The Week put up 17 first covers of famous American magazines, including Time (1923), Newsweek (then News-Week, 1933), Life (1936), New York (1968) and Wired (1993).

On February 21, 1925, Eustace Tilley came to life as a cover icon for The New Yorker (note the cover price: 15 cents. In 1965 it was 25 cents; in 1991, $1.75; and today, $6.99).

The first cover photo of Sports Illustrated in 1954 featured a swinging Eddie Matthews (career stats: .271 batting average, 512 home runs, 2 World Series titles, debuted for the Boston Braves, before they moved to Milwaukee and then Atlanta, and long after they were known as the Boston Beaneaters).

And how about that first cover of The Atlantic Monthly., which sent its first issue to press in 1857 to crowd the newsstands with Harper’s, which had launched seven years earlier.

Check out all 17 covers and their stories.

A couple of years ago the Magazines Canada blog started posting first covers of Canadian magazines, featuring National Magazine Award winners like The Beaver (1920), Chatelaine (1928), The Fiddlehead (1945), THIS Magazine (1966), Cottage Life (1988), The Walrus (2003) and more.

Hot on the Newsstand: 3 magazines making news right now

The 10th anniversary issue of The Walrus hit newsstands last week, an impressive 124-page, perfect-bound magazine with a cover photograph by Edward Burtynsky. On the inside, illustrations by Barry Blitt, fiction by Lisa Moore, and journalism from Ron Graham, Mellissa Fung, Katrina Onstad, Andrew Coyne and more.

The Walrus was born in October 2003, when the big stories were Paul Martin, SARS and a re-arming Russia (plus Lewis Lapham essaying on Marshall McLuhan). Since then the magazine has won 99 National Magazine Awards for its journalism, fiction, poetry, design, photography and illustration, and won Magazine of the Year in 2007. Buyers of the anniversary issue will also receive a free Walrus e-Book and be entered in a drawing to win a place on an Adventure Canada Greenland and Wild Labrador expedition.

A newly renovated Western Living is out on newsstands this month, featuring a bold redesign by art director Paul Roelofs for the magazine’s annual Designers of the Year issue. More than just a new look, however, the award-winning TC Media title has expanded its content, too, with a host of new columns (including Just One Room, On Trend, 48 Hours In, Out There, Spirit Guide) and an editorial roster that promises readers “more faces in places, more pan-regional content, an authoritative voice, more entertaining stories [and] more travel stories with a design focus.” 

The September Designers of the Year issue is the largest for the magazine in 20 years, and is accompanied by events in Vancouver (with the Western Living Design Week from Sept 12-22) and Calgary (on Oct 2) celebrating the best new designs in Western Canada. Founded in 1970, Western Living has won 13 National Magazine Awards from 49 nominations.

The September-October issue of This Magazine presents its annual Corporate Hall of Shame report, and this year the publication is adding a twist: launching a new film series Every Film is Political. The series gets underway with a screening on September 25 of the film WAL-TOWN, “director Sergeo Kirby’s NFB-produced look at the business practices of mega-retailer Wal Mart and the ongoing debate of the company’s effect on towns across Canada.” The film will be screened at the Tranzac in Toronto (event info and tickets). The new issue of This Magazine, winner of 17 National Magazine Awards since 1977, is on stands now.

Border Crossings, Eighteen Bridges, subTerrain big winners at Western Magazine Awards

[This post has been updated] At last Friday night’s Western Magazine Awards gala in Vancouver, the Winnipeg-based arts and culture magazine Border Crossings was named Western Magazine of the Year, in a ceremony at the Renaissance Vancouver Hotel Harbourside, hosted by Jo-Ann Roberts.

Alberta Oil was named Trade Magazine of the Year, while Toque & Canoe won for Best Online Magazine. And Coast Mountain Culture took the prize for Best New Magazine.

Eighteen Bridges won the award for Best Alberta/NWT magazine, as well as two three individual awards, for Best Alberta/NWT Article, for Best Public Issues Article and for Best Culture & Entertainment Article, the latter for “The Populist” by Curtis Gillespie, which won Honourable Mention in Profiles at this year’s National Magazine Awards.

Vancouver indie literary mag subTerrain won the awards for Fiction and for Best Illustration. Up Here also won two awards, for Best Profile and for Best Travel & Leisure Article. Vancouver Magazine won for Best Art Direction of a Single Article and for Best Human Experience Article.

New Trail Winter 2012_Big Melt.pdfIn the Best Photograph category the winner was “The Changing Face of the North” by John Ulan in New Trail, which also won Honourable Mention in Creative Photography at this year’s National Magazine Awards.

[Update] The Gold Award for Best Saskatchewan Article went to Ayelet Tsabari for “Yemeni Soup and Other Recipes” in Grain, which also won a Silver Award in the One-of-a-Kind category at this year’s NMAs.

Best New Writer went to Melissa Molloy for “The Accuser and Us” in Profiles West. Ms. Molloy also won the award for Best New Writer at this year’s Alberta Magazine Awards.

Best Cover went to “Last Supper” from Avenue, art direction by Anders Knudsen, which also won the same award at the Alberta Magazine Awards.

Other winners include Alberta Views, BC Business, Focus, Grain, Impact, Swerve and Western Living. Visit westernmagazineawards.ca for more information, or check out the Canadian Magazines blog for more coverage.

Paul and Audrey Grescoe were recognized as winners of the WMA Lifetime Achievement Award.

Related Post:
Western Magazine Awards announce finalists

Canada’s Best Magazine Covers of 2012

At the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala last week, the Gold Award for Best Magazine Cover went to Adbusters, for the cover of their 100th issue, entitled “Are We Happy Yet?”

"Are We Happy Yet?" - Adbusters, Art Direction by Will Brown and Pedro Inoue

“Are We Happy Yet?” – Adbusters, Art Direction by Will Brown and Pedro Inoue

Why the judges picked this cover: “It resonated loudly and immediately on all counts, with its tight connection between the striking cover image and the solitary cover line. An instant classic… [it] challenges one of the primary goals of advertising–to stimulate desires–and implicitly answers its own question. At once strong, direct, incisive, compelling and complete: a brilliant magazine cover.”

The Silver award for Magazine Covers went to Maisonneuve.

"Issue 45" - Maisonneuve, Art Direction by Anna Minzhulina

“Issue 45″ – Maisonneuve, Art Direction by Anna Minzhulina

Congratulations to all the winners of the 36th National Magazine Awards.

Related post:
Meet the NMA Finalists for Magazine Covers

Announcing the winners of the 36th National Magazine Awards!

Tonight the National Magazine Awards Foundation (NMAF) presented the winners of the 36th annual National Magazine Awards at a gala this evening in Toronto at The Carlu, presented by CDS Global, and hosted by Canadian actor Zaib Shaikh. Gold, Silver and Honourable Mention awards were presented in 47 categories, after the NMAF’s 250 volunteer judges evaluated 2000 submissions from nearly 200 Canadian consumer magazines.

[Version française]
[Complete list of winners PDF]
[36th NMA Gold Book]

Magazine of the Year

The coveted award for Magazine of the Year went to Corporate Knights. Honourable Mention for Magazine of the Year was awarded to Cottage Life, UPPERCASE and Urbania.

The award for Tablet Magazine of the Year went to Canadian House & Home for their “Colour Issue” from March 2012.

The award for Magazine Website of the Year went to Hazlitt, the online literary magazine published by Random House Canada.

Renowned Canadian editor, teacher and mentor Stephen Trumper was presented with the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement.

The winner of the award for Best New Magazine Writer was Sierra Skye Gemma, for her story “The Wrong Way” published in The New Quarterly.

Top Winning Magazines at the 36th National Magazine Awards:

Magazine

Gold

Silver

HM

L’actualité

6

0

18

The Grid

5

2

15

The Walrus

4

2

17

Hazlitt

3

0

1

Report on Business

2

5

13

Maisonneuve

2

3

9

Maclean’s

2

2

16

Corduroy

2

0

0

Toronto Life

1

4

24

Sportsnet

1

2

7

Eighteen Bridges

1

1

8

Canadian House & Home

1

1

5

Explore

1

1

4

Reader’s Digest

1

1

2

The Feathertale Review

1

1

0

Québec Science

0

2

1

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE AWARDS
The article “Building with the Brigadier” (Report on Business) by Greg McArthur and Graeme Smith—about the SNC-Lavalin investment in Libya—was the most celebrated individual article of the 36th National Magazine Awards, winning two Gold Awards, in Business and in Investigative Reporting, as well as Silver in Politics & Public Interest.

The Gold award for Best Single Issue went to The Feathertale Review (“Issue 9”), the Toronto-based independent arts magazine. The Silver went to Toronto Life (“The Loneliest Man in Toronto”).

The Gold award for the best Magazine Cover of the year went to Adbusters for their fast food satire “Are We Happy Yet?” by Will Brown and Pedro Inoue. “Issue 45” of Maisonneuve by Anna Minzhulina took the Silver award.

The new online literary magazine Hazlitt, in addition to winning Magazine Website of the Year, also took the Gold awards for Magazine Website Design and for best Online Video, the latter for the first installment of their interview series “Pagelicker 01: Irvine Welsh.”

Journalist Catherine Dubé of L’actualité won her eighth National Magazine Award with a Gold in Service: Health & Family, for “Faut-il interdire le cellulaire à l’école?” – one of six Gold awards won by L’actualité, the most of any magazine.

Journalists from L’actualité also won Gold in Politics & Public Interest (“Jason, le missionaire de Harper” by Alec Castonguay); in Service: Personal Finance & Business (“La guerre des retraites est commencée” by Annick Poitras); in Profiles (“L’étoffe d’un premier ministre?” by Noémi Mercier); in Photojournalism & Photo Essay (“Au coeur d’Attawapiskat” by Renaud Philippe); and in Spot Illustration (“Papa souffre, moi aussi” by Gérard Dubois).

The Grid led all publications with 7 total awards, including 5 Gold Awards: in Editorial Package: Web for their feature “Are You Going to Eat That?”; in Single Service Article Package for “The Grid Guide to Getting Hitched”; in How-To for “The Grid Guide to Buying a Condo”; in Creative Photography for “Truckin’ A!” by Angus Rowe MacPherson; and in Art Direction of a Single Magazine Article, for “Chef’s Guide to Toronto” by Vanessa Wyse.

Corduroy, an independent style and fashion magazine based in Toronto, won Gold for Art Direction of an Entire Issue (“Issue 10”) and in Fashion (“ten covers x ten models”), with art direction by Peter Ash Lee.

Writer Chris Turner led all individuals with four nominations and won Gold in Travel for “On Tipping in Cuba” in The Walrus. Mr. Turner has now won nine National Magazine Awards.

The Walrus won 6 total awards including 4 Gold: in addition to the Travel category, also winning Gold in Illustration (“Apocalypse Soon” by Sam Weber); in One-of-a-Kind (“What Would Tommy Douglas Think?” by Tom Jokinen); and in Society (“Fade to Light” by Dave Cameron).

In Words & Pictures the Gold award went to “On Thin Ice” in Canada’s History, by Terry Mosher (a.k.a. Aislin), Mark Reid and Michel Groleau.

Writer Alison Motluk won Gold in Health & Medicine for her story “Is Egg Donation Dangerous?” in Maisonneuve. For Ms. Motluk this is her third National Magazine Award. The Montreal quarterly’s other Gold award came in the category Best Short Feature, for “Notes from the End of the War” by Jonathan Montpetit.

In Fiction the Gold went to Alberta novelist Caroline Adderson for her short story “Ellen-Celine, Celine-Ellen” published in Canadian Notes & Queries. Former Governor General Literary Award winner Patrick deWitt won the Silver for “The Looking-Ahead Artist” in Brick.

In Poetry the Gold winner was former Governor General Literary Award winner Karen Connelly for her poem “The Speed of Rust, or, He Marries” in Geist. Sue Goyette won the Silver for her series of “Fashion” poems in Prairie Fire.

The story “Whale Rising” by Jeff Warren in Reader’s Digest was a double winner, taking Gold in Science, Technology & Environment and Silver in Essays.

Sportsnet took the Gold in Editorial Package: Print, for “Sports that can kill.” Québec Science won Silver for “50 défis pour 2050.”

Emma Teitel of Maclean’s won the Gold award in Columns. Ms. Teitel won Honourable Mention last year in the category Best New Magazine Writer.

Six of the ten finalists in the new category Blogs were from Maclean’s, with the blog “Science-ish” by Julia Belluz—a former winner of the National Magazine Award for Best Student Writer—winning Gold. Paul Wells won the Silver for “Inkless Wells.”

In Portrait Photography the Gold went to “Never Left Art School,” a series of portraits of artist Douglas Coupland by Mark Peckmezian for Montecristo.

The new French-language literary magazine Nouveau Projet won its first National Magazine Award for “Faux self mon amour” by Fanny Britt in the category Personal Journalism.

Eighteen Bridges gained ten nominations and won Gold in Humour for “The Hairs about our Secrets” by Jessica Johnson.

Toronto Life led all publications with 29 nominations, winning a Gold in Arts & Entertainment for “Something Borrowed” by Leah McLaren.

The new Globe & Mail magazine Globe Style Advisor won its first National Magazine Award, a Gold in the category Beauty for “Lady Obscura.”

Also winning Gold Awards:

Visit magazine-awards.com for the complete list of winners and to download the commemorative 36th National Magazine Awards Gold Book.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The National Magazine Awards Foundation acknowledges the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage, as well as financial support from the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario, and the Ontario Media Development Corporation. The National Magazine Awards Foundation gratefully acknowledges its suppliers and its contributors who donated gifts in kind to support the awards program. We thank them for their generosity, interest and expertise.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL MAGAZINE AWARDS FOUNDATION
The National Magazine Awards Foundation is a bilingual, not-for-profit institution whose mission is to recognize and promote excellence in the content and creation of Canadian print and digital publications through an annual program of awards and national publicity efforts. magazine-awards.com

Oilweek, Up Here Business, Marketing big winners at 59th Kenneth R. Wilson Awards

Last night inside the Grand Banking Hall at One King West in Toronto, Canadian Business Press announced the winners of the 59th annual Kenneth R. Wilson Awards for Canadian B2B publishing, presented by CDS Global.

Complete list of winners. KRW digital Gold Book.

K_MoYt-oilweekWith two divisions for Magazine of the Year, Up Here Business was named Magazine of the Year–Professional, while Oilweek won Magazine of the Year–Trade. Read what the KRW judges said about these winning magazines.

Best Issue of the year went to Les Affaires for their May 2012 issue “Le pouvoir créatif.”

Best Cover went to Oilsands Review for their September 2012 cover:

Precedent won the award for Website of the Year.

The inaugural Kenneth R. Wilson Award for Best New Journalist went to Katie Keir for her article “When Good Partners go Bad” in Advisor’s Edge.

Marketing magazine led all publications with 3 Gold and 2 Silver awards, followed by CAmagazine, Up Here Business, OHS Canada and Conseiller.

Top Winning Magazines at the 59th Kenneth R. Wilson Awards:

Magazine

Gold

Silver

HM

Marketing

3

2

9

CAmagazine

3

1

13

Up Here Business

2

0

4

OHS Canada

2

0

3

Conseiller

2

0

0

Les Affaires

1

2

6

Precedent

1

2

5

Le Coopérateur agricole

1

2

0

University Affairs

1

1

6

Alberta Oil

1

1

2

Notable winners include writer Jason Contant, who won two Gold awards for OHS Canada. And Nicolas Mesly won a Gold and two Silver awards for his work in Le Coopérateur agricole.

Tom Gierasimczuk, former editor of Marketing and now vice-president of editorial at Canada Wide Media, emcee’d the gala for the second year in a row. Tom was also a Gold winner himself, in the category Best Profile of a Company (“Vice Age” in Marketing).

For all the winners and coverage, visit krwawards.ca or on twitter @KRWawards and #KRW13.

Update: List of all 59th KRW nominees and winners (pdf)

Meet the NMA Finalists for Magazine Covers

A great magazine cover attracts the reader with alluring images and solid display; the perfect blend of editorial and design that makes the magazine such a unique and special medium. At this year’s National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 [INFO & TICKETS] one of these 10 nominees will earn the right to be called Canada’s best magazine cover:

"Are We Happy Yet?" - Adbusters, Art Direction by Will Brown and Pedro Inoue

“Are We Happy Yet?” – Adbusters, Art Direction by Will Brown and Pedro Inoue

"March/April 2012" - Azure, Art Direction by Concrete Design Communications

“March/April 2012″ – Azure, Art Direction by Concrete Design Communications

"The New Oilpatch" - Canadian Business, Art Direction by John Montgomery

“The New Oilpatch” – Canadian Business, Art Direction by John Montgomery

"The Secret Khadr File" - Maclean's, Art Direction by Stephen Gregory

“The Secret Khadr File” – Maclean’s, Art Direction by Stephen Gregory

"Issue 45" - Maisonneuve, Art Direction by Anna Minzhulina

“Issue 45″ – Maisonneuve, Art Direction by Anna Minzhulina

"Colombia" - Report on Business, Art Direction by Domenic Macri

“Colombia” – Report on Business, Art Direction by Domenic Macri

"January 12, 2012" - The Grid, Art Direction by Vanessa Wyse

“January 12, 2012″ – The Grid, Art Direction by Vanessa Wyse

"That Time We Beat the Americans" - The Walrus, Art Direction by Brian Morgan

“That Time We Beat the Americans” – The Walrus, Art Direction by Brian Morgan & Anita Kunz

"The Northwest Passage" -  Up Here, Art Direction by John Pekelsky

“The Northwest Passage” – Up Here, Art Direction by John Pekelsky

"July/August 2012" - Vancouver Magazine, Art Direction by Randall Watson

“July/August 2012″ – Vancouver Magazine, Art Direction by Randall Watson

Congratulations to all the nominees in Magazine Covers. The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed at the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 at The Carlu in Toronto. [INFO & TICKETS]

Meet the NMA Finalists for:
Art Direction for an Entire Issue
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Best New Magazine Writer
Illustration

Announcing the Nominees for the 36th National Magazine Awards!

Today the NMAF announces the nominees for the 36th annual National Magazine Awards!

[Version française]
[PDF Nominations List]
[Tickets]

In the category Magazine of the Year the jury has selected four finalists:

Corporate Knights
Cottage Life
Uppercase
Urbania

Nominated for Tablet Magazine of the Year are Canadian House & Home (“The Colour Issue”), Maclean’s (“Canada’s Best Restaurants”) and Chez Soi (“Noël 100% déco”).

And the nominees for Magazine Website of the Year are Hazlitt, Maclean’s and Toronto Life.

The winner of the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, announced on April 30, is Stephen Trumper.

Leading all magazines with 29 nominations for this year’s National Magazine Awards is Toronto Life, followed by L’actualité (24), The Walrus (23), The Grid (22), Maclean’s and Report on Business (20 each).

Top Nominated Magazines for the 36th National Magazine Awards:

Magazine

Written

Integrated

Visual

Special

Total

Toronto Life

19

4

4

2

29

L’actualité

20

0

4

0

24

The Walrus

15

3

5

0

23

The Grid

8

7

7

0

22

Maclean’s

17

1

0

2

20

Report on Business

13

3

4

0

20

Maisonneuve

10

2

1

1

14

Cottage Life

4

3

2

1

10

Eighteen Bridges

10

0

0

0

10

Sportsnet

9

0

1

0

10

enRoute

3

2

4

0

9

The New Quarterly

7

0

0

1

8

Magazine of the Year Finalist

Magazine of the Year Finalist

Nine magazines are nominated for National Magazine Awards for the first time:
Chez Soi
Globe Style Advisor
(3 nominations)
Hazlitt
(4 nominations)
Infopresse
Le Must
New Trail
Nouveau Projet
(2 nominations)
Ottawa Citizen Style

Write Magazine

Chris Turner leads all individual finalists with 4 nominations in written categories for his work in Canadian Geographic, Marketing and The Walrus. Garnering 3 individual nominations are Catherine Dubé (L’actualité), Dan Robson (Sportsnet), Iain Marlow (Report on Business) and Dominique Forget (ELLE Québec, Jobboom and L’actualité).

Magazine of the Year Finalist

Magazine of the Year Finalist

The article “Building with the Brigadier” (Report on Business) by Greg McArthur and Graeme Smith has the distinction of being nominated in 3 categories: Business, Investigative Reporting and Politics & Public Interest.

The 10 finalists for the best Canadian Magazine Cover of 2012 come from Adbusters, Azure, Canadian Business, Maclean’s, Maisonneuve, Report on Business, The Grid, The Walrus, Up Here and Vancouver.

There are 8 finalists for the award for Best Single Issue: Cottage Life (“June 2012”), enRoute (“The Food Issue”), LE Must (“Santé alimentaire”), Maisonneuve (“Tenth Anniversary Issue”), The Feathertale Review (“Issue 9”), The Grid (“May 10”), The Walrus (“November 2012”) and Toronto Life (“The Loneliest Man in Toronto”).

The 3 finalists for Best New Magazine Writer are Chris Hampton (for “The Place Where Art Sleeps”; Maisonneuve), Sierra Skye Gemma (for “The Wrong Way”; The New Quarterly), and May Jeong (“The Cult of Pastor Song”; Toronto Life).

Magazine of the Year Finalist

Magazine of the Year Finalist

In addition to the new category Tablet Magazine of the Year, for 2012 the NMAF created 2 other new categories for digital content. In the new integrated category Online Video, the 5 finalists are “Balcony Makeover” (Canadian House & Home), “Les coulisses du reportage mode Icône” (ELLE Québec), “Pagelicker 01: Irvine Welsh” (Hazlitt), “Reboot on Life” (Ottawa Citizen Style), and “Toronto’s National Anthem” (The Grid).

Of the 10 finalists in the new written category Blogs, 6 are from Maclean’s, 2 from Torontoist, and 1 each from L’actualité and Today’s Parent.

Congratulations to all the finalists!
[PDF Nominations List]

Magazine of the Year Finalist

Magazine of the Year Finalist

The 36th annual National Magazine Awards Gala
Join us for the 36th annual National Magazine Awards, Friday June 7 at the fabulous Carlu in Toronto. [Tickets]

Gold and Silver awards will be handed down on June 7 in 24 written categories, 12 visual categories and 6 integrated categories. All other finalists will receive Honourable Mention. Winners will also be celebrated in 5 special categories: Outstanding Achievement, Best New Magazine Writer, Magazine Website of the Year, Tablet Magazine of the Year, and Magazine of the Year.

Gold winners in written, visual and integrated categories (except Best Single Issue) receive a cash prize of $1000; Silver winners $500. The winner of Best New Magazine Writer receives a cash prize of $500.

Credit Changes
If you are a National Magazine Award nominee, please let us know of any credit changes to your nomination no later than Thursday May 9, 2013.

Thank you!
A grand thank you to all of our judges who evaluated this year’s entries to the National Magazine Awards. From nearly 2,000 individual entries nationwide, the NMAF’s 251 volunteer judges nominated a total of 365 submissions from 87 different Canadian magazines for awards in 47 written, visual, integrated and special categories.

Acknowledgements
The National Magazine Awards Foundation acknowledges the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage, as well as financial support from the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario, and the Ontario Media Development Corporation. The National Magazine Awards Foundation gratefully acknowledges its suppliers and its contributors who donated gifts in kind to support the awards program. We thank them for their generosity, interest and expertise.

NMA_SM_May1

New cover of Boston Magazine honours the resilience of a city

Boston Magazine

Boston magazine’s “We Will Finish the Race” cover on its May issue is being called perfect. The magazine put a call out for donations of shoes from this year’s race to photograph this iconic image, which taps into the collective grief, resilience and catharsis of a city following the Boston Marathon bombings.

According to an article in Runner’s World, the May issue of the magazine was about to head to the printer on that fateful day, but the publishers were able to obtain an extension to re-shoot their cover in the wake of the tragedy. The magazine received over 150 pairs of shoes in donation and interviewed each of the donors about their experience in the race. 15 of those stories appear in the May issue.

Boston associate Art Director Liz Noftle told Yahoo! News:

We wanted to do something really special that would honor the runners and everything they had to go through in the events of marathon. We had only a few days to pull something together. Monday night we came up with the concept, and Tuesday began to execute it. It was only made possible by the help of everyone on staff. We reached out to anyone and everyone to collect shoes in less than 48 hours. It was a tremendous effort by everyone—people going out of their way to bring in shoes, interns collecting them, organizing couriers to bring them here. Then we drove them all down to New York on Thursday, where Mitchell Feinberg photographed them, and we closed the magazine while the city was in lockdown on Friday.

More behind the scenes at Boston magazine.

Chatelaine’s bold and bilingual new logo

The award-winning magazine Chatelaine has redesigned its cover logo on its May 2013 print issue and sleek website, featuring a bold and bilingual typography integrating l’accent circonflexe of its French counterpart, Châtelaine, which will also use the same logo beginning with the June 2013 issue.

According to a story in Marketing,

The all-uppercase logo, described as “fresh, modern and clean” by publisher Tara Tucker, uses the Neutraface 2 typeface and is bilingual (it has a stylized circumflex on the first “a”). Tucker said the timing was right to debut a new look as the magazine is kicking off its 85th anniversary celebrations in June.” [Read more]

Since 1977 Chatelaine and Châtelaine have won 15 and 23 National Magazine Awards, respectively.

{ Tip o’ the hat: Canadian Magazines blog }

Atlantic Journalism Awards finalists announced

The annual Atlantic Journalism Awards gala will be held on Saturday, May 11 at the Halifax Marriott Harbourfront Hotel. The finalists were announced last week, and the magazine nominees include Herald Magazine, Saltscapes, Progress, East Coast Living, Atlantic Salmon Journal, CBC Maritime Magazine, and Atlantic Business Magazine.

The 3 finalists for the coveted award of Best Magazine Cover are:

East Coast Living, Summer 2012

East Coast Living, Summer 2012

Saltscapes, January/Feburary 2012

Saltscapes, January/Feburary 2012

Atlantic Salmon Journal, December 2012

Atlantic Salmon Journal, December 2012

In the category for best Atlantic Magazine Article, the three finalists are:

  • John DeMont, Herald Magazine, “Does Nova Scotia Get the Government it Deserves?”
  • Marjorie Simmins, Progress Magazine, “To the Manor Born”
  • Martin Silverstone, Atlantic Salmon Journal,  “Atlantic Salmon to the End”

And for best Magazine Profile Article, the nominees are:

  • John DeMont, Herald Magazine, “Graham Day”
  • Martin Silverstone, Atlantic Salmon Journal, “River Princess”
  • Paul McLeod, Herald Magazine, “Kathy Dunderdale’s Revolution”

Check out all the finalists here. Winners will be announced on May 11.

Best Cover finalists for the Alberta Magazine Awards

With the 2013 Alberta Magazine Awards ceremony coming up on the calendar on March 14 (part of the Alberta Magazines Conference of March 14-15 in Calgary), we’re looking forward to seeing who will take the top honours this year.

Among the 14 Showcase categories to be presented at the gala is the always intriguing competition for Best Magazine Cover. Here’s a look at the 8 finalists this year for the top Alberta magazine cover:

Ryan Girard, art director; Marco Cibola, illustrator

Ryan Girard and Kim Larson, art directors; John Gaucher, photographer

Kim Larson, art director; Gary Stevensen, illustrator

Anders Knudsen and Erin Burns, art directors; Jared Sych, photographer; Alicja Wilkosz, hair and makeup; Julie Van Rosendaal, food stylist

Marcey Andrews, art director; Raymond Biesinger, illustrator

Cathy Ozubko, creative lead; Joel Kadziolka, designer; Deborah Jaremko, editor

Vishu Mahajan, art director; Joey Podlubny, photographer

Danae Thompson, art director; Josh Holinaty, illustrator

Check out all the finalists here. The winner of Best Cover and all the other Alberta Magazine Awards will be announced on March 14.

Vote for your favourite British magazine cover

The United Kingdom’s Professional Publisher’s Association is marking its 100th anniversary with a magazine covers contest open to public vote.

While there are only ten finalists from which to choose (rather disappointing, considering the thousands of titles and hundreds of thousands of magazine issues that have been published since 1913), the small selection is spread across generations and broad topics, from the world wars to technology, from the first issue of Cosmo to the legacies of Churchill, Chernobyl and Darth Vader.

This blogger was drawn to the 1941 Harper’s Bazaar cover featuring plump, almost Atari-like bombs falling around St. Paul’s Cathedral in London, with a brilliant yellow streak of fabric drawing the eye up through a blood-red bow to the helmeted dress form. The absence of cover lines makes a lasting impact, and the inherent nostalgia of the price line (“two shillings and sixpence”) probably swayed me, too. A magazine cover for its time and all time. (Or so says one voice. What do you think?)

Click here to view the finalists and vote. Voting closes on the distant date of September 30, 2013, and the winner will be announced on November 21, the exact one-hundred-year anniversary of PPA’s establishment.

{Tip o’ the hat: Canadian Magazines blog}

Elle Québec, SkyNews, Canadian Business among winners at Canadian Cover Awards

[This post has been updated] Last night at the Courtyard Hotel in downtown Toronto the redesigned Canadian Cover Awards were presented to an audience of Canadian magazine industry professionals. Produced by CMC and Magazines Canada, and sponsored by the Alliance for Audited Media, the reception showcased awards for the most successful Canadian magazine cover in 7 categories:

Three finalists were named in each category. UPDATE: Magazines Canada press release on the winners.

Additionally, SkyNews publisher and veteran industry leader Greg Keilty was named Newsstand Marketer of the Year.

Cottage Life magazine’s circulation coordinator Amanda Beattie hosted the event. The awards competition was open to all Canadian magazine issues distributed on Canadian newsstands in 2011 and 2012 that are now sales final.

Twitter reax and more.

Related post: New Canadian Cover Awards now accepting submissions

New Canadian Cover Awards now accepting submissions

The redeveloped Canadian Cover Awards / Grands prix canadiens-Meilleures couvertures are accepting submissions for their eight categories until January 25, 2013.

The awards recognize and celebrate the success of the Canadian magazine industry’s top selling magazine covers. Honours go to titles with sizzling sell lines, compelling photography, clever illustrations—whatever made the consumer pick up and purchase that magazine.

The entry fee is $90 for the first entry, $75 for the second, and $55 each for the 3rd entry and beyond.

Visit coverawards.ca for details.

Magazine of the Year Maisonneuve redesigns cover for Winter 2012

The Winter 2012 issue of Maisonneuve, featuring the National Magazine Award seal for Magazine of the Year, and with a cover story by NMA winner Alison Motluk on the risks of human egg donation.

Notice, too, the new design of the cover by award-winning Art Director Anna Minzhulina, with the title and logo much bigger, and the absence of cover lines for a cleaner, bolder cover. (The cover lines appear on a half-cover for newsstand and subscription copies.)

By comparison, at right is the recent Fall 2012 cover.

Read more about the issue and the redesign here.

The making of a Sportsnet magazine cover

Sportsnet, the sharp new magazine launched a year ago–and which won a pair of National Magazine Awards earlier this year–just released this great video on how a magazine cover is created.

(Hat tip Canadian Magazines via J-source)

For more on Sportsnet‘s National Magazine Award-winning work, visit the NMA archives.

OWL Magazine redesigned for 35th anniversary

Remember the magazine that got you started loving magazines? Well, it’s 35 years old and still inspiring children to form a lasting bond with learning and literacy. OWL, the National Magazine Award-winning periodical for 9-13 year olds, has rolled out a redesign for its 35th anniversary:

OWL has been nominated for 13 National Magazine Awards in its history. Former art director Tim Davin twice won a NMA for his creative design of the magazine. And in 1993, no doubt to the glee of many who grew up with the magazine, OWL was named Canada’s Magazine of the Year.

Read more over at the Masthead blog on the redesign of OWL.

Meet the NMA Finalists for Magazine Covers

On June 7 the NMAF will announce the winners of the 2011 National Magazine Awards at our 35th anniversary gala. One of the most coveted prizes is that of Magazine Covers. Previous winners include Weekend Magazine, Quest, The Idler, Shift, Equinox, Saturday Night and Azure, among others.

For 2011 there are 10 finalists for the National Magazine Award for best Magazine Cover:

“Blackberry is Toast / A Toast to Blackberry” – Canadian Business – Art Direction by Una Janicijevic; Contributors: Jason Logan, Ronit Novak, Shanghoon

This is the third time that Canadian Business has been nominated for Magazine Covers.

“Earn Your Stripes on Canada’s Wildest Slopes” – enRoute – Art Direction by Nathalie Cusson

enRoute has now been nominated nine times for Magazine Covers; they won Gold in 1994.

“Jeff Mallett” – Report on Business – Art Direction by Domenic Macri

This year marks the eighth Magazine Covers nomination for Report on Business and seventh for Art Director Domenic Macri since 2003. They won Gold in 2005 and 2009.

“Got Spunk?” – The Grid – Art Direction by Vanessa Wyse

Launched in May 2011, The Grid  has been nominated for seventeen total NMAs in its first year at the awards, including twice for Magazine Covers.

“Beyond Gay” – The Grid – Art Direction by Vanessa Wyse

“The Future of Food” – The Walrus – Art Direction by Brian Morgan

This is the seventh nomination for The Walrus in Magazine Covers since 2003. They won Silver in 2006 and 2007.

“45th Anniversary Special” – This Magazine – Art Direction by David Donald

Its 45th anniversary cover is the fourth nomination all time for This Magazine in Magazine Covers.

“The Truth about Tim Hudak” – Toronto Life – Art Direction by Christine Dewairy

Toronto Life is a four-time Gold winner for Magazine Covers, most recently in 2008. They also won the Gold here at the very first National Magazine Awards in 1977.

“Bébés” – Urbania – Art Direction by Philippe Lamarre

Urbania won Silver in this category last year, and has been nominated a total of four times since 2005.

“101 Things to Taste” – Vancouver Magazine – Art Direction by Randall Watson

For Vancouver Magazine and Art Director Randall Watson, this is their sixth nomination for Magazine Covers since 2004.

The winner will be revealed June 7 at the 35th anniversary National Magazine Awards. Tickets are on sale now.

Related Posts:
Meet the NMA Finalists for: Best New Visual Creator | Art Director for an Entire Issue
National Magazine Award-winning Covers 2007-2010

Vote for Your Favourite Quebec Magazine Cover

The Quebec Magazine Awards (locally known as Les Grands Prix des Magazines du Québec) are offering mag fans the chance to vote for their favourite cover from amongst the 10 finalists for that award. You can vote up until May 14. The winner of the public vote will be revealed before the actual winner (according to the judges) at the Grands Prix gala later this month.

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