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Off the Page, with Sierra Skye Gemma

Off the Page appears regularly on the Magazine Awards blog. Today we catch up with Sierra Skye Gemma, winner of the 2012 National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Writer.

[This post has been updated to include the new deadline for the Prism International Creative Non-fiction contest deadline: Dec 5.]

NMAF: Earlier this year you won the National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Writer for a story called “The Wrong Way” (The New Quarterly), a personal essay and critical meditation on the stages of grief. Tell us a bit about how you developed this story and why you decided to submit it in the annual non-fiction writing competition from TNQ?

Sierra Skye Gemma (Photo: Nadya Kwandibens)

Sierra Skye Gemma (Photo: Nadya Kwandibens)

Sierra: The Wrong Way came out of an assignment in a Creative Non-fiction course with Andreas Schroeder. I had never written a personal essay before and when I started I wasn’t even sure what I wanted to say. Not exactly, anyway. I looked up Kübler-Ross’s Five Stages of Grief because I thought it would explain my experiences. I thought I could structure my essay according to the stages, but I realized that Kübler-Ross’s theory didn’t apply to my life at all. My essay then developed as a sort of antagonistic call-and-response with conventional grief theories.

I sat and wrote it in two sittings, straight through from beginning to end. I didn’t move things around after that and I barely edited it. That said, I had bits and pieces of it already written. Little vignettes that I hadn’t known what to do with before, like the story of buying my son the fish and aquatic frog. I had also taken extensive notes when my sister died and I wrote down lots of dialogue. Maybe that sounds weird; maybe not, if you’re a writer. But what do you do with a short “scene” between siblings that, when read on its own, seems to make light of the death of another sibling? Well, I guess you build an elaborate home in which it can live. The Wrong Way was that home for many of my disjointed experiences with grief.

I submitted the essay to The New Quarterly’s Edna Staebler Personal Essay Contest because Andreas Schroeder told me to submit it to a contest (and not through the slush pile of regular submissions); he thought the essay was good enough to win. The New Quarterly’s personal essay contest seemed like the obvious choice. The lesson here? Always listen to Andreas Schroeder.

Click to read "The Wrong Way" by Sierra Skye Gemma

Click to read “The Wrong Way” by Sierra Skye Gemma

NMAF: What was the significance for you as a young writer winning that contest and then the National Magazine Award?

Sierra: Winning both the contest and the NMA gave me confidence in my writing, which I never really had before. Winning the NMA also got my work noticed. After I won Best New Magazine Writer, the essay was selected to appear in the Best Canadian Essays 2013 anthology, alongside some very successful writers. It is an amazing honour that I feel would not have happened without the National Magazine Awards.

NMAF: As a writer and also an editor of PRISM International, a literary magazine published by the Creative Writing Program at UBC, you are in a good position to survey the landscape of Canadian literary arts. What are the challenges and rewards of devoting yourself to this industry?

Sierra: I think the greatest challenge to being an editor of a literary magazine (or a writer for that matter) is money. There is not a lot of money in literary magazines. Small lit mags live and die by the decisions of the Canada Council for the Arts and the various provincial Arts Councils. They live and die by the seemingly small financial decisions of their staff. They live and die by their contest entries and subscriptions and by the ebb and flow of their donations. Editing and managing a literary magazine is not a career for the lazy or the extravagant. It takes a lot of careful, cautious, and sometimes tedious work to keep a literary magazine alive.

That said, it is so emotionally rewarding.  I have been a reader for the past two Creative Non-fiction Contests at PRISM and I will be a reader again this year. The emotional rollercoaster that this work has taken me on is intense. You feel the author’s highs and lows. I’ve cried and I’ve laughed until I’ve been in tears.

Although I’ve also read for other contests and other magazines, it is PRISM’s Non-fiction Contest that really makes it worth it for me because the stories are real and they matter. They matter to the author, who is risking so much to share; to the readers with whom the stories will resonate; to the editors, who have the responsibility for creating the long list and the short list; and to the contest judge who has to make the toughest decisions.

Our Creative Non-fiction Contest deadline is coming up on November 28th [Update: December 5] and I can’t wait to start reading again!

NMAF: What are your immediate goals as a writer, and what are you working on these days?

Sierra: This summer I received a grant from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada to perform research for a novel set in 1950’s California. I spent three months in northern California—taking notes, visiting museums and farms, interviewing seniors and experts, and exploring the countryside—so my research is nearly completed.

I’ve been meaning to finish my outline and start writing, but I’ve been a little distracted by another project that I have been working on for over a year: a humorous and irreverent parenting book that I’m co-writing with blogger Emily Wight. We have completed our non-fiction book proposal and one sample chapter, but I’d like to get a few more chapters done before I launch into the novel.

Sierra Skye Gemma is an award-winning writer and journalist working towards an MFA in Creative Writing at the University of British Columbia. Aside from the National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Writer, this year Sierra was also honoured with the first-place award in creative non-fiction in Rhubarb’s Taboo Literary Contest, a long-list nod in House of Anansi’s Broken Social Scene Story Contest, and a BC Arts Council scholarship. She is an executive editor of PRISM international, western Canada’s oldest literary magazine. Her work has been published in The New Quarterly, The Vancouver Sun, Plenitude, and elsewhere. Follow her on Twitter @SierraGemma.

More:
The National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Writer
Meet the finalists for Best New Magazine Writer
A Writer’s Guide to Canadian Literary Magazines
Your Guide to Fall 2013 Canadian Magazine Writing Contests
More Off the Page interviews

NMA winner Carol Shaben to accept prize at Laurier University

National Magazine Award winner Carol Shaben, whose recent book Into the Abyss began as an award-winning story in The Walrus, will speak at two public events this Wednesday, November 13, at Wilfrid Laurier University, and will receive the 2013 Edna Staebler Prize which was announced earlier this year.

First, an interview with Ms. Shaben, conducted by Bruce Gillespie, assistant professor of Journalism, will take place on Laurier’s Brantford campus from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in RCW203. Then, the presentation of the Edna Staebler award will take place on Laurier’s Waterloo campus, beginning at 7 p.m. in the Senate and Board Chamber.

Carol Shaben is a freelance writer who lives in Vancouver with her husband and son. In 2005 she left a business career to focus on her long-time passion for writing, and in 2009 she was nominated for three National Magazine Awards, winning two: a Gold Medal for Investigative Reporting and a Silver Medal for Politics and Public Interest. Into the Abyss is her first book. She was also a finalist for Best New Magazine Writer of 2009.

Related posts: 
Off the Page, with Carol Shaben (interview)
New book by NMA winner looks at the safety of our skies

More: Carol Shaben in the National Magazine Awards archive

Meet the NMA Finalists for Best New Magazine Writer

One of the most exciting awards each year at the National Magazine Awards gala is that of Best New Magazine Writer, sponsored by Reader’s Digest Foundation. This award, including a cash prize of $500, goes to a writer whose early work in Canadian magazines shows the highest degree of craft and promise. This year, our judges have nominated three finalists, one of whom will be named Canada’s Best New Magazine Writer at the awards gala on June 7.
[INFO & TICKETS]

And the nominees are…

Chris Hampton, for “The Place Where Art Sleeps” (Maisonneuve)

Chris Hampton

Chris Hampton is completing graduate studies in journalism at Ryerson University. He has contributed to Maisonneuve, the National PostChart Attack, and The Huffington Post.

What the judges said about it: “In evocative and entertaining prose, Chris Hampton takes the reader on a visual journey to a cloistered world where some of art’s greatest treasures lie hidden from public view. With a keen eye for detail, he makes the underground realm of high art accessible and fascinating.”

Sierra Skye Gemma, for “The Wrong Way” (The New Quarterly)

Sierra Skye Gemma

Sierra Skye Gemma

Sierra Skye Gemma is an award-winning writer and journalist. Her story “The Wrong Way” was the winner of The New Quarterly 2012 Edna Staebler Personal Essay Contest. She is currently completing an MFA in Creative Writing at the University of British Columbia.

What the judges said: “With a fresh voice and a strong command of style and structure, Sierra Skye Gemma digs ever deeper into the story of a lost life, writing with both edginess and verve in this meditation on the process of grieving. A terrific example of personal exposition, her story is powerful and lasting.”

May Jeong, for “The Cult of Pastor Song” (Toronto Life)

May Jeong

May Jeong

May Jeong is a graduate of the University of Toronto and now is a freelance reporter who has written for The Globe and Mail, Reuters, The New York Times and Toronto Life, among others. She lives in Kabul, Afghanistan.

What the judges said: “Fearless reporting characterizes this investigative exposé from May Jeong, who gains exclusive access to multiple sources as she pieces together a controversial narrative of fraud and sexual abuse. Immersing herself in a difficult story, she shows real courage and great promise as a writer.”

Congratulations to all the nominees in Best New Magazine Writer. The winner will be revealed at the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 at The Carlu in Toronto. [INFO & TICKETS]

Meet the NMA Finalists for:
Art Direction for an Entire Issue
Photojournalism & Photo Essay

Announcing the Nominees for the 36th National Magazine Awards!

Today the NMAF announces the nominees for the 36th annual National Magazine Awards!

[Version française]
[PDF Nominations List]
[Tickets]

In the category Magazine of the Year the jury has selected four finalists:

Corporate Knights
Cottage Life
Uppercase
Urbania

Nominated for Tablet Magazine of the Year are Canadian House & Home (“The Colour Issue”), Maclean’s (“Canada’s Best Restaurants”) and Chez Soi (“Noël 100% déco”).

And the nominees for Magazine Website of the Year are Hazlitt, Maclean’s and Toronto Life.

The winner of the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, announced on April 30, is Stephen Trumper.

Leading all magazines with 29 nominations for this year’s National Magazine Awards is Toronto Life, followed by L’actualité (24), The Walrus (23), The Grid (22), Maclean’s and Report on Business (20 each).

Top Nominated Magazines for the 36th National Magazine Awards:

Magazine

Written

Integrated

Visual

Special

Total

Toronto Life

19

4

4

2

29

L’actualité

20

0

4

0

24

The Walrus

15

3

5

0

23

The Grid

8

7

7

0

22

Maclean’s

17

1

0

2

20

Report on Business

13

3

4

0

20

Maisonneuve

10

2

1

1

14

Cottage Life

4

3

2

1

10

Eighteen Bridges

10

0

0

0

10

Sportsnet

9

0

1

0

10

enRoute

3

2

4

0

9

The New Quarterly

7

0

0

1

8

Magazine of the Year Finalist

Magazine of the Year Finalist

Nine magazines are nominated for National Magazine Awards for the first time:
Chez Soi
Globe Style Advisor
(3 nominations)
Hazlitt
(4 nominations)
Infopresse
Le Must
New Trail
Nouveau Projet
(2 nominations)
Ottawa Citizen Style

Write Magazine

Chris Turner leads all individual finalists with 4 nominations in written categories for his work in Canadian Geographic, Marketing and The Walrus. Garnering 3 individual nominations are Catherine Dubé (L’actualité), Dan Robson (Sportsnet), Iain Marlow (Report on Business) and Dominique Forget (ELLE Québec, Jobboom and L’actualité).

Magazine of the Year Finalist

Magazine of the Year Finalist

The article “Building with the Brigadier” (Report on Business) by Greg McArthur and Graeme Smith has the distinction of being nominated in 3 categories: Business, Investigative Reporting and Politics & Public Interest.

The 10 finalists for the best Canadian Magazine Cover of 2012 come from Adbusters, Azure, Canadian Business, Maclean’s, Maisonneuve, Report on Business, The Grid, The Walrus, Up Here and Vancouver.

There are 8 finalists for the award for Best Single Issue: Cottage Life (“June 2012”), enRoute (“The Food Issue”), LE Must (“Santé alimentaire”), Maisonneuve (“Tenth Anniversary Issue”), The Feathertale Review (“Issue 9”), The Grid (“May 10”), The Walrus (“November 2012”) and Toronto Life (“The Loneliest Man in Toronto”).

The 3 finalists for Best New Magazine Writer are Chris Hampton (for “The Place Where Art Sleeps”; Maisonneuve), Sierra Skye Gemma (for “The Wrong Way”; The New Quarterly), and May Jeong (“The Cult of Pastor Song”; Toronto Life).

Magazine of the Year Finalist

Magazine of the Year Finalist

In addition to the new category Tablet Magazine of the Year, for 2012 the NMAF created 2 other new categories for digital content. In the new integrated category Online Video, the 5 finalists are “Balcony Makeover” (Canadian House & Home), “Les coulisses du reportage mode Icône” (ELLE Québec), “Pagelicker 01: Irvine Welsh” (Hazlitt), “Reboot on Life” (Ottawa Citizen Style), and “Toronto’s National Anthem” (The Grid).

Of the 10 finalists in the new written category Blogs, 6 are from Maclean’s, 2 from Torontoist, and 1 each from L’actualité and Today’s Parent.

Congratulations to all the finalists!
[PDF Nominations List]

Magazine of the Year Finalist

Magazine of the Year Finalist

The 36th annual National Magazine Awards Gala
Join us for the 36th annual National Magazine Awards, Friday June 7 at the fabulous Carlu in Toronto. [Tickets]

Gold and Silver awards will be handed down on June 7 in 24 written categories, 12 visual categories and 6 integrated categories. All other finalists will receive Honourable Mention. Winners will also be celebrated in 5 special categories: Outstanding Achievement, Best New Magazine Writer, Magazine Website of the Year, Tablet Magazine of the Year, and Magazine of the Year.

Gold winners in written, visual and integrated categories (except Best Single Issue) receive a cash prize of $1000; Silver winners $500. The winner of Best New Magazine Writer receives a cash prize of $500.

Credit Changes
If you are a National Magazine Award nominee, please let us know of any credit changes to your nomination no later than Thursday May 9, 2013.

Thank you!
A grand thank you to all of our judges who evaluated this year’s entries to the National Magazine Awards. From nearly 2,000 individual entries nationwide, the NMAF’s 251 volunteer judges nominated a total of 365 submissions from 87 different Canadian magazines for awards in 47 written, visual, integrated and special categories.

Acknowledgements
The National Magazine Awards Foundation acknowledges the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage, as well as financial support from the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario, and the Ontario Media Development Corporation. The National Magazine Awards Foundation gratefully acknowledges its suppliers and its contributors who donated gifts in kind to support the awards program. We thank them for their generosity, interest and expertise.

NMA_SM_May1

Alberta Magazine Awards finalists announced

The finalists for the 2013 Alberta Magazine Awards have been announced by the Alberta Magazine Publishers Association, with awards to be presented in 14 Showcase categories on March 14.

Swerve–the “Calgary inside & out” magazine–leads all publications with 17 nominations.

Also receiving an impressive haul of nominations are Alberta Venture (11), Alberta Oil (10), Eighteen Bridges (10), Alberta Views (6) and Avenue Calgary (6).

Alberta Venture editor Mike Ganley has been named the Editor of the Year, while Elaine Kupser of IMPACT Magazine is the recipient of the award for Achievement in Publishing.

The Amber Webb-Bowerman Memorial Foundation Award for Emerging Writer has 4 finalists:

Check out all the nominees. Tickets for the Alberta Magazine Awards gala are on sale until March 7. More info at albertamagazines.com.

Related post: January 10 deadline approaches for Alberta Magazine Awards

Final deadline for Kenneth R. Wilson Awards is February 15

The 59th annual Kenneth R. Wilson Awards for Canadian B2B magazine publishing are accepting submissions until Friday, February 15.

Submitters may enter online at krwawards.ca and all required hard copies are due by 5pm on Friday.

There are 25 categories (13 written, 4 visual, 3 digital and 5 special).

Among the new categories this year is the inaugural Kenneth R. Wilson Award for Best New Journalist, which celebrates the achievements of a writer whose early work in B2B magazine journalism shows the highest degree of craft and promise.

Submissions must consist of a feature-length, non-fiction article (1000 words or greater) published in a Canadian business-to-business publication in 2012, along with a letter of reference from an editor, teacher, mentor or colleague.

Editors are encouraged to submit on behalf of their writers.

For more information, visit krwawards.ca.

Spotlight: The National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Writer

Each year one of the most exciting moments at National Magazine Awards gala is discovering which hardworking young magazine journalist is named Canada’s Best New Magazine Writer.
[Version française ici]

Submissions in this category are open to students as well as young magazine writers whose early work in Canadian magazines shows the highest degree of craft and promise.

The competition is open to work published during 2012 in print, tablet or web-based Canadian magazines. Individuals may enter their own work (see the full requirements here), but editors, teachers and mentors are encouraged to nominate the talented young writers they’ve worked with.

Details:

  • Entry Fee: $25
  • Deadline: January 16, 2013
  • Requirements: Tear sheets plus a letter of recommendation
  • Finalists: A shortlist of 3 finalists will be announced May 1, 2013
  • Winners: The winner will be revealed at the NMA Gala on June 7, 2013
  • Prize: The winner receives a cash prize of $500, a certificate, industry recognition on stage, and promotion of their work in various NMAF publications and archive; the other two finalists will receive Honourable Mention, a certificate, various publicity, and their work will appear in the NMA archive.
  • More informationVisit our website for complete submissions and award details.
  • To SubmitClick here to register online.

Among last year’s three finalists, two were recent graduates of Ryerson University’s School of Journalism and the third was a young columnist for Maclean’s.

The winner was Liam Casey, whose award-winning piece “Suicide Notes” (Ryerson Review of Journalism) won over the judges with its passion and its courageous investigative reporting. Liam Casey is now a staff reporter at the Toronto Star.

"Suicide Notes" by Liam Casey in the Ryerson Review of Journalism. (Click image to read the complete article.)

“Suicide Notes” by Liam Casey in the Ryerson Review of Journalism. (Click image to read the complete article.)

The winner of this year’s National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Writer will join a group of award laureates that includes Matthieu AikinsPatrick WhiteChantal SrivastavaJeremy KlaszusJonathan TrudelMatthew McKinnonDanielle GroenJean-François BéginSophie Lees, and Kris Demeanor.

Check out some of our interviews with past winners and finalists for this award:

Read more about the award for Best New Magazine Writer. Read the full text of past finalists and winners in our archive.

Click here to submit. The submissions deadline is January 16, 2013.

Liam Casey, winner of the 2011 award for Best New Magazine Writer, accepts his award on stage at the NMA Gala.

Liam Casey, winner of the 2011 award for Best New Magazine Writer, accepts his award on stage at the NMA Gala.

Related posts:

Spotlight: The National Magazine Award for Best New Visual Creator

Photographer Jake Rosenberg accepts the award for Best New Visual Creator at the 35th National Magazine Awards gala.

Photographer Jake Rosenberg accepts the award for Best New Visual Creator at the 35th National Magazine Awards gala.

The award for Best New Visual Creator is one of our special awards, which recognizes excellence in illustration, photography or digital image creation by a young Canadian artist in a Canadian magazine. [Version française ici]

Submissions in this category are open to students as well as young magazine artists whose early work in Canadian magazines shows the highest degree of craft and promise.

The competition is open to work published during 2012 in either print or digital Canadian magazines, including online magazines and tablet editions. Individuals may enter their own work (see the full requirements here), but editors, art directors and teachers are encouraged to nominate the talented young artists they’ve worked with, even discovered.

Details:

  • Entry Fee: $25
  • Deadline: January 16, 2013
  • Requirements: Tear sheets plus a letter of recommendation
  • Finalists: A shortlist of 3 finalists will be announced May 1, 2013
  • Winners: The winner will be revealed at the NMA Gala on June 7, 2013
  • Prize: The winner receives a cash prize of $500, a certificate, industry recognition on stage, and promotion of their work in various NMAF publications; the other two finalists will receive Honourable Mention, a certificate, various publicity, and their work will appear in the NMA archives.
  • More information: Visit our website for complete submissions and award details.
  • To Submit: Click here to register online.

Last year’s three finalists included a photographer, a digital illustrator, and a visual-arts collective. The winner was The Coveteur, for their curation called “Strictly Top Shelf” in Report on Business magazine (below).

Read our interview with The Coveteur about their National Magazine Award and their visual creations.

Byron Eggenschwiler created this image for the cover of the 33rd NMA Program.

Byron Eggenschwiler created this image for the cover of the 33rd NMA Program.

The inaugural winner of this award in 2009 was illustrator Byron Eggenschwiler, now a multiple National Magazine Award winner who also designed the creative for the 33rd National Magazine Awards. Byron was a double winner at the 2011 National Magazine Awards, with a Gold in Spot Illustration and a Silver in Illustration.

Read more about Best New Visual Creator and the National Magazine Awards.

The submissions deadline is January 16, 2013.

[Click here to Submit] [Version française]

Related Post: Off the Page, with The Coveteur

Off the Page, with The Coveteur

Off the Page is an exclusive series produced by the NMAF that reaches out to former National Magazine Award winners to find out what their awards have meant to them and what they’re up to now. Off the Page will appear each Thursday on the Magazine Awards blog during the fall of 2012. This week we catch up with the 2011 winners of Best New Visual Creator: The Coveteur. The Coveteur are designer Erin Kleinberg, stylist Stephanie Mark and photographer Jake Rosenberg. 

NMAFAt this year’s National Magazine Awards The Coveteur was named Canada’s Best New Visual Creator for your spread “Strictly Top Shelf” in Report on Business magazine. First of all, what is The Coveteur, and where does it make the biggest impact on the world of fashion and style?

The Coveteur: Erin Kleinberg, Jake Rosenberg and Stephanie Mark

The Coveteur: The Coveteur takes you into the closets of today’s celebrities and fashion icons so you can discover their unique style. Our site features exclusive photography and videos and provides a behind the scenes community for fashion lovers. Our followers can collect and share their favorite images in their own “closet” and then shop the look of Coveteurs from around the globe—from New York to Paris, London and beyond.

We make an impact by redefining the way people shop and the way they view the still-life by showcasing the styles of today’s tastemakers in a new light that is also shoppable.

NMAF: How did you get involved with Report on Business, and how did you develop your winning piece—which the judges lauded for “magnifying the desirability of objects”; “a perfect balance of style and composition”—for the magazine?

The Coveteur: We are loyal readers of Report on Business and we were thrilled and honoured when they approached us to contribute. We created a holiday gift guide in signature Coveteur fashion and arranged the products in such a way that brings them to life and makes each one appear as a character in an environment.

Our community enjoys the quirk of an image—a stuffed monkey wearing a pair of designer glasses styled amongst other great products—as it highlights the product when showcased in an unexpected, eccentric way. Keeping the sophisticated Report on Business reader in mind, we chose exceptional, high-end products for the feature.

National Magazine Award-winning layout from The Coveteur, in Report on Business magazine

NMAF: Your online “curations” (coveteurs) seem to borrow a bit from traditional fashion magazine layouts while also being remarkably innovative in tapping the power of social media, digital publishing and e-commerce. What have been some of your influences from the world of magazines—fashion, style, design, etc—while developing this unique approach to exhibition?

The Coveteur: We have all had individual and unique experiences working in these different yet connected areas. Erin worked for W Magazine alongside director Alex White who taught her to push stylistic boundaries, which catches the reader off-guard and calls for a second glance. She recalls a photo shoot with model Doutzen Kroes staged in a field and littered with teddy bears—a consistent quirkiness that has remained an integral part of her styling since.

Stephanie, who went to Parsons [School for Design] for fashion marketing and interned with Kate Lanphear at Elle Magazine, has a keen eye for picking great product from across the globe and is our in-house e-commerce wiz.

Jake’s visual inspiration comes from the work of Ben Watts and his vivid editorial imagery as well as Raymond Meier’s ability to bring product to life through editing. His photography is bright, vivid and intimate, adding a certain “glow” which tells a unique story about each subject and their personal style.

The Coveteur have profiled dozens of styles, including that of Miss Piggy!

NMAF: Do you have any other current or upcoming projects in magazines to tell us about? 

The Coveteur: We just shot an exclusive, eight-page spread for the October/November 2012 issue of Air France Madame magazine filled with the best accessories of the season and shot in our distinct stylistic approach. As for what else is coming up? You’ll just have to stay tuned!

Check out all of fantastic curations of Stephanie, Erin and Jake at thecoveteur.com

Opportunities for Students at the National Magazine Awards

Attention all journalism school students, creative writers, young artists and magazine professionals: The National Magazine Awards Foundation (NMAF) has a number of initiatives and opportunities for you.

Awards: Best New Magazine Writer & Best New Visual Creator
While all NMA categories are open to work published by students and young professionals, we have two categories open exclusively to your talent, with cash prizes and recognition at the annual NMA Gala. Submissions for work published in 2012 will be accepted starting on December 1 with a deadline of January 16.
[Read more about these awards]
[Check out last year's winners]

E-Book: Best in Magazines 2007-2012
A collection of over 30 National Magazine Award-winning stories, photo essays, illustrations and covers from the past 5 years, our new eBook is available absolutely FREE for your iPad and features the best in magazine journalism from The Walrus, Maisonneuve, Explore, Eighteen Bridges, AlbertaViews, Swerve, Report on Business, The New Quarterly, Toronto Life, Ryerson Review of Journalism & many others.
[Read more]
[Download the Free App]

Internships at the NMAF
We are offering 2 paid Administrative Internship positions for students interested in pursuing a career in the Canadian magazine industry. Internships are part-time and run from December through June. The deadline for applications to this year’s internship program is November 7.  [Read more]

NMA Online Archives
This summer we hosted a Reading Series featuring award-winning articles from our online archive of previous National Magazine Award winners. The reading series & archive are great opportunities to catch up on the best of the best in Canadian magazine journalism–we have full-text PDF versions of all finalists and winners from recent years–and find inspiration for your future work.
[Dive into the NMA Archive]
[Cozy up with our Summer Reading Series]

Resources & Other Awards
On our website we maintain an exhaustive list of magazine and journalism awards across Canada, and periodically on our blog we feature in depth information about these awards and contests.
[Follow the Magazine Awards blog]
[See which Magazine Writing Contests are going on now]

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for frequent updates, news and opportunities from the NMAF. If you have any questions about the National Magazine Awards, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us.

Best regards for a successful year!

Alberta to Get Literary this weekend

The Alberta Magazine Publishers Association is bringing the best of local literary journalism to Calgary’s Olympic Plaza (or Central Library, in the event of rain) this Sunday, August 26, with readings by some of the West’s best prose and poetry artists.

The event will be hosted by Kris Demeanor, former winner of the National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Writer,* now the poet laureat of the City of Calgary.

Participating authors include National Magazine Award finalists Marcello di Cintio, Fred Stenson and Naomi K. Lewis, and others.

Visit the AMPA for more information.

*Read “Get a Real Job” by Kris Demeanor in unlimited, 2008 winner of Best New Magazine Writer at the National Magazine Awards. Visit the NMA Archives to read full-text articles by hundreds of finalists and winners.

Check out Papirmasse with NMA Winner Genevieve Simms

Papirmasse, they say, is a magazine, work of art, and social experiment all rolled into one. Subscribers to the publication receive each month a specially commissioned art print with an original piece of creative writing on the flip side.

This month, Issue #32 of Papirmasse (pronounced PAH-purr-mass, a play on the Dutch word for ‘pulp’) features National Magazine Award-winning illustrator Genevieve Simms* and a short story by Matt Prins.

Papirmasse was founded to recognize emerging artists and promote their work among art enthusiasts who may be looking for something beyond reprints of Old Masters for their collections. According to the site:

Papirmasse was founded in 2008 by Canadian artist Kirsten McCrea. Realizing that few people are in a position to buy original artwork and that the reproductions offered in commercial stores are bland and banal, Papirmasse was born.  Appreciators of art who would like to own original and contemporary works: rejoice!  Here at Papirmasse, art is for everyone.

Visit http://papirmasse.com/art/ or @papirmasse for more info. And check out the back issues for more inspiration to subscribe.

* Genevieve Simms won Gold in the category Spot Illustration at the 2010 National Magazine Awards, for her work “Northern Vegas” in AlbertaViews magazine. She was also a finalist in 2009 for the award Best New Visual Creator for her work in Swerve

Meet the NMA Finalists for Best New Magazine Writer

We’re getting ready to celebrate the 35th anniversary National Magazine Awards on June 7 at the fabulous Carlu in Toronto. Among the many great nominees this year are 3 finalists for the special award Best New Magazine Writer, which is generously sponsored by L’Oréal Canada.

This award will go to a writer whose early work in magazines (print or digital) shows the highest degree of craft and promise. The award is open to students and magazine writers with a maximum of two years’ experience in professional journalism.

Click on the images to read the full text of each of this year’s three finalists:

“The New Paparazzi” by Emma Teitel, for Maclean’s

What the judges said about Emma Teitel:
What a voice Emma Teitel has! Well researched and beautifully paced, her story of the Facebook generation is rich with personal insight. Her writing is full of bravura; authoritative and punchy. Writing a column in a national magazine is a remarkable achievement, especially for someone so young. She is clearly a natural for this style of journalism.

“Suicide Notes” by Liam Casey, for the Ryerson Review of Journalism

What the judges said about Liam Casey:
In a rare combination of eloquent personal journalism and meticulous reporting, Liam Casey has confronted a highly charged question that has been dodged for so long – the practice in newsrooms of non-reporting of suicide. With tremendous honesty he has put himself inside the story of the pain of depression, and emerged with a strong commentary on journalism. Not many writers have made such an impact with one of their first pieces.

“Not All Smurfs and Sunshine” by Matthew Scianitti, for the Ryerson Review of Journalism

What the judges said about Matthew Scianitti:
With formidable storytelling chops Matthew Scianitti brings a complicated character – Chris Jones – to life. He combines diligent reporting with an effortless prose style, and deftly mimics the style of his interview subject. He has demonstrated a strong capacity for crafting a profile. A delight to follow, his work is a telling description of a bright young writer.

The winner will be revealed June 7 at the 35th anniversary National Magazine Awards. Tickets are on sale now.

Related Posts:
Meet the NMA Finalists for: Best New Visual Creator | Art Direction for an Entire Issue | Magazine Covers | Magazine of the Year–Digital | Words & Pictures | Single Service Article Package | Photojournalism & Photo Essay

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Meet the NMA finalists for Best New Visual Creator

Last week the NMAF announced the nominees for the 35th anniversary National Magazine Awards. This year there are 3 finalists for the special award Best New Visual Creator. The category Best New Visual Creator is generously sponsored by the Reader’s Digest Foundation.

This award will go to an illustrator, photographer or digital image creator whose early work in magazines (print or digital) shows the highest degree of craft and promise. The award is open to students and magazine photographers and illustrators with a maximum of two years’ experience in professional journalism.

For 2011 there are 3 finalists. Click on the image to view the full work.

Trevor Melanson, for Canadian Business

What the judges said about Trevor Melanson:
With an impressive capacity to reduce, organize and visualize complex data, Trevor Melanson is an exceptional, natural talent in the digital medium. He has a unique ability to fashion raw information as engaging and editorial content for readers. His visual style is absolutely brilliant.

The Coveteur, for Report on Business

What the judges said about The Coveteur:
A tasteful curation of photographs that succeeds in magnifying the desirability of objects, The Coveteur’s “Gifts” are a perfect balance of style and composition.  The look and feel engages the viewer effortlessly, which speaks to the impressive talent of this young trio: stylist Stephanie Mark, designer Erin Kleinberg, and photographer Jake Rosenberg. We’ll be seeing lots more of their work in the future.

Andrew B. Myers, for Report on Business

What the judges said about Andrew B. Myers:
A photographer who possesses the ability to give soul to a lifeless subject, Andrew B. Myers has very honestly captured the unfulfilled promise of solar power with an empty sky, thawing snow on a monotonous field of panels, and the hint of solar flare. His approach to the subject is thoughtful, and his composition elegant and imbued with meaning.

The winner of the 2011 National Magazine Award for Best New Visual Creator will be announced at the 35th anniversary NMA gala on June 7 in Toronto. Tickets are available now.

Familiar names vie for National Newspaper Awards

[This post has been updated] Friday night 25 of Canada’s newspapers and news agencies hope to hear their names called at the 63rd edition of the National Newspaper Awards, where there are a total of 71 finalists competing for awards in 22 categories.

Patrick White, the 2007 winner of the National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Writer and now a reporter for The Globe and Mail, is nominated for his coverage of “The Trials of Nunavut” in the Long Features category.

Competing against Patrick in Long Features, also from The Globe and Mail, is ten-time National Magazine Award winner (and two-time host of the NMA gala) Ian Brown, nominated for his investigation into pre-natal testing.

Eric Reguly, a National Magazine Award winner last year for Investigative Reporting, is nominated for a NNA for his columns also in The Globe and Mail.

The awards will be presented tonight  Friday night in Toronto. The National Magazine Awards finalists will be announced next week on May 1, with the gala on June 7. Stay tuned for announcements and ticket information.

[Update April 28: Patrick White won for Best Long Feature. Congrats Patrick!]

Ryerson Review of Journalism launches Summer 2012 issue

The Ryerson Review of Journalism launched its Summer 2012 issue at the Gladstone Hotel in Toronto last week among well-known faces of the Canadian magazine industry (including many National Magazine Award winners). The National Magazine Awards Foundation is always eager to welcome new talent in the industry, and its staff and interns were also present to celebrate the launch.

First created in 1985 as a “watchdog for the watchdogs,” the RRJ is produced by Ryerson journalism students in their final year. The current faculty and instructors working with the students hold a total of 25 NMAs. The instructor for this issue, Lynn Cunningham, won the Foundation Award Outstanding Achievement in 1998.

As can be expected, learning from such outstanding professionals has led the students to create a magazine that lives up to its mandate and produces award-winning features: the RRJ currently holds a total of 23 National Magazine Award nominations including 2 Golds for Best Student Writer and 3 Silvers in the Profiles, Politics & Public Interest, and Portrait Photography categories. We wish the magazine and its young masthead the best of luck in the future.

Ryerson students and NMAF interns Wajiha Suboor and Rebecca Zanussi show off the Summer 2012 RRJ issue with NMAF Special Projects Manager Richard A Johnson

Off the Page, with Jonathan Trudel

[For this special edition of Off the Page, we present our interview with Jonathan Trudel in its original French, with the English version below.]

La nouvelle série Off the Page est une exclusivité produite par la Fondation nationale du prix du magazine canadien (FNPMC) et qui offre aux anciens lauréats de Prix du magazine canadien une tribune où ils sont invités à exprimer ce que leur prix a signifié pour eux et à nous dire où ils en sont aujourd’hui dans leur carrière. La série « Off the Page » paraîtra périodiquement dans notre blogue à l’hiver et au printemps 2012. Cette semaine, nous découvrons quoi de neuf avec le rédacteur Jonathan Trudel.

FNPMC : Vous avez remporté le Prix Alexander Ross du Meilleur nouvel auteur, en 2001, pour votre travail dans L’actualité. Quels souvenirs avez-vous de la réception de ce prix et qu’a-t-il signifié pour vous dans le contexte de votre début de carrière?

Jonathan : J’étais nerveux et intimidé! Je débutais ma carrière en journalisme magazine, et il s’agissait de ma toute première présence à un gala des Grands prix du magazine canadien à Toronto. Écrire de longs reportages de type magazine n’est jamais un exercice facile — même après 12 ans à L’actualité. Quand je m’installe devant mon ordinateur, je me demande encore parfois si j’ai choisi le bon métier. Le Prix Alexander Ross m’a permis de croire, le temps d’un instant, que j’ai peut-être fait le bon choix. Les prix de journalisme — et les Prix du Magazine Canadien sont certainement parmi les plus prestigieux — aident les jeunes journalistes à bâtir leur confiance en soi et à se forger une crédibilité et une réputation dans le milieu.

Cela dit, c’est toujours à recommencer. Après avoir gagné le Prix Alexander Ross en 2001, ma rédactrice en chef m’avait félicité mais aussitôt lancé un défi. En souriant, elle m’avait dit : «Maintenant, il faudra revenir ici, à Toronto, et gagner un prix dans une catégorie rédactionnelle, en compétition avec tous les journalistes du monde du magazine, pas seulement les nouveaux.»

FNPMC : Depuis cette époque, votre carrière dans le secteur des magazines a été prolifique : vous avez été en nomination 17 fois aux Prix du magazine canadien, remportant 4 médaille d’Or et 1 médaille d’Argent pour vos articles dans L’actualité, pour vos textes sur des sujets tels que la santé au masculin, l’écosystème amazonien et même la vedette du hockey Alex Kovalev. À quoi attribuez-vous votre réussite et celle de L’actualité?

Jonathan : Un des grands avantages d’être journaliste à L’actualité, c’est d’avoir du temps. Du temps pour concevoir un sujet. Pour réfléchir. Pour aller sur le terrain, que ce soit en banlieue de Montréal, dans le nord de l’Alberta ou ailleurs. Le journaliste Thomas Friedman, du New York Times, a l’habitude de dire : «If you don’t go, you don’t know.» C’est encore plus vrai en cette heure plutôt difficile pour le journalisme, alors que nous devons trouver des façons de nous démarquer, de montrer pourquoi nous sommes pertinents.

J’ai aussi la chance d’avoir le temps d’écrire. C’est à la fois un luxe et une responsabilité. Quand on dispose de plusieurs semaines pour produire un reportage, on a moins le droit à l’erreur ou d’amorcer son texte avec un mauvais «lead», par exemple. On n’a pas d’excuse.

FNPMC : À quels projets avez-vous travaillé récemment, et croyez-vous que nous verrons votre nom aux prochains Prix du magazine canadien?

Jonathan : Pour le meilleur et pour le pire, je reste un indécrottable journaliste généraliste. C’est inscrit dans mes gènes. En ce moment, je prépare un reportage sur les Canadiens de Montréal, un autre sur les conditions de travail des médecins et je m’apprête à me plonger dans la couverture des élections américaines. J’ai aussi la chance, depuis l’automne, de partager une charge de cours en journalisme à l’Université de Montréal.

Quand à savoir si je serai présent aux prochain gala des prix, je n’en sais rien. Mais bien honnêtement, il est totalement irréaliste de s’attendre à gagner chaque année à Toronto. La compétition est beaucoup trop féroce!

Jonathan Trudel est un rédacteur attitré de L’actualité. Son plus récent article lauréat d’un Prix du magazine canadien, « Un bulldozer nommé PKP », a remporté le médaille d’Or dans la catégorie Affaires, en 2010. Pour plus d’information sur le travail de Jonathan, consultez ses archives à L’actualité.

"Santé, Bonjour le privé" by Jonathan Trudel in L'actualité won a Gold National Magazine Award in 2008, in Service: Health & Family

Off the Page is an exclusive new series produced by the NMAF that reaches out to former National Magazine Award winners to find out what their awards have meant to them and what they’re up to now. Off the Page will appear regularly on the NMA blog during the winter and spring of 2012. This week we catch up with National Magazine Award-winning writer Jonathan Trudel.

NMAF: You won the Alexander Ross Award for Best New Magazine Writer back in 2001 for your work in L’actualité. What do you recall about winning that award and what did it mean for your young career in magazines?

Jonathan: I felt nervous and intimidated! At the time I was just beginning my career as a magazine journalist, and I was attending the gala for the very first time. Writing long feature stories is never an easy task — even after 12 years at L’actualité, I have to admit it’s still a struggle. When I sit in front of my computer, I sometimes wonder if I have chosen the right career. The Alexander Ross Award allowed me to believe, for a moment, that I might have made the right choice. Journalism prizes — and the National Magazine Awards are certainly among the most prestigious in the country — help to build self confidence and give young journalists a chance to establish credibility and reputation in the industry.

That being said, it’s always a new beginning. When I won the Alexander Ross Award back in 2001, my editor in chief congratulated me but almost immediately issued a challenge. With a grin, she said: “Ok, now you’ll have to come back here and earn a prize in a written category, competing with all the journalists in the magazine industry, not only the new ones.”

NMAF: Since then, your magazine career has been prolific: you’ve been nominated 17 times for National Magazine Awards, winning four Gold awards and 1 Silver award for your reporting in L’actualité, for writing about topics such as men’s health, the Amazon ecosystem and even hockey star Alex Kovalev. Why do you think you and L’actualité have been so successful?

Jonathan: One of the main advantages of being a staff writer at L’actualité magazine is that we have time: time to conceive a story; time to think; time to do reporting on the ground, whether it’s in a suburb near Montreal, in northern Alberta or elsewhere. Thomas Friedman, from The New York Times, often says: “If you don’t go, you don’t know.” I think it’s especially true in these rather difficult times for journalism, when we need to find ways to show our value and prove that we are still relevant.

I also have another opportunity: time to write. It’s at once a luxury and a responsibility. When you have weeks to file a story, the expectations (from your boss and your readers) are higher. You don’t have the right to be boring. There is no excuse.

NMAF: What have you been working on recently, and do you think we’ll see your name at the next National Magazine Awards? 

Jonathan: For better or for worse, I have very broad journalistic interests. It’s in my DNA. These days, I’m working on one story about the Montreal Canadiens, another about the working conditions of physicians, and I’m about to jump into the coverage of the upcoming presidential elections in the USA. Since last fall, I’ve also been teaching journalism at Université de Montréal.

Now, will I attend the next National Magazine Awards gala? Of course I can’t possibly know. But honestly, it’s totally unrealistic to expect to win every year on this stage. The competition is way too ferocious!

Jonathan Trudel is a staff writer at L’actualité. His most recent National Magazine Award-winning article — “Un bulldozer nommé PKP” — won the Gold prize in the Business category in 2010. Read more of Jonathan’s work at his archive at L’actualité.

Off the Page, with Jeremy Klaszus

Off the Page is an exclusive new series produced by the NMAF that reaches out to former National Magazine Award winners to find out what their awards have meant to them and what they’re up to now. Off the Page will appear regularly on the NMA blog during the winter and spring of 2012. This week we catch up with National Magazine Award-winning writer Jeremy Klaszus.

NMAF: In 2007 you won the award for Best New Magazine Writer (then known as the Alexander Ross Award) at the 30th anniversary National Magazine Awards. You’d written an investigative piece in AlbertaViews called “Big Oil on Trial” about a Canadian energy company and the Sudanese civil war. How did that piece come about for you and for AlbertaViews?

Jeremy: I was an intern at the magazine at the time. Somehow I heard of a lawsuit filed in the U.S., in which the company was being sued for complicity in genocide. As I looked into this, I was amazed that Alberta’s media (with a few exceptions) weren’t reporting on this case. That, to me, seemed like a story in itself, and that’s the angle I pursued. I filed Access to Information requests which gave information on how the federal government had tried to get the case thrown out of court.

AlbertaViews very graciously gave me the time to work on this story, and never once balked at the idea. It paid off.

NMAF: What has it meant for you personally and professionally to win that award (and your more recent NMA — a 2009 Gold prize in One of a Kind for “Mr. Tree,” a three-part biography of your grandfather’s life in Germany during World War II, also published in AlbertaViews)?

"Mr. Tree" by Jeremy Klaszus, AlbertaViews, April 2009

Jeremy: It’s funny how it all worked out. I was out of my element at the 2007 awards ceremony, a green Alberta writer among seasoned Toronto magazine types. It was all very intimidating. But I happened to be sitting at a table with Ian Pearson, who was at the time an editor at the Banff Centre’s literary journalism program. You should apply, he told me. I didn’t think I had a shot, but sure enough, I applied and got accepted. At the Banff Centre the following summer, I wrote “Mr. Tree,” working with editor Moira Farr. So when that story ended up winning an NMA, it was as if everything came full circle. It was all quite surreal.

Winning that NMA was especially rewarding because the story was quite personal. As well, the story had been rejected by numerous magazines before AlbertaViews picked it up. That fact made the win even more gratifying, and dulled the sting from those rejections.

NMAF: Where has your career taken you since then?

Jeremy: I have been freelancing for the past couple years. In 2010, I ghost wrote a memoir for legendary cowboy singer and rancher Ian Tyson (The Long Trail, published by Random House Canada). I suspect my NMAs might have helped me land that gig, as I don’t know one end of the horse from the other. At least when I drove out to Tyson’s ranch to meet him for the first time, terrified, I could point to the awards as proof that I could do the job.

These days, I do a lot of stuff for Swerve magazine based in Calgary. I write a regular column in the Calgary Herald. I’m working on something for Reader’s Digest. As well, I am a part-time journalism instructor at Mount Royal University.

Jeremy Klaszus’s new book, Mr. Tree, is available through Blurb books, and all profits are being donated to Médecins Sans Frontières. Read more about Jeremy at jeremyklaszus.com and at the NMAF’s Creators Profiles.

Why should young writers and artists enter the NMAs?

Liam Casey, winner of the 2011 award for Best New Magazine Writer, accepts his award on stage at the NMA Gala.

[This post has been updated for 2012]

Few moments at the annual National Magazine Awards gala are as satisfying as discovering which talented up-and-comers are named Canada’s Best New Magazine Writer and Best New Visual Creator. Submissions in these categories are open to students as well as young magazine writers, illustrators and photographers whose early work in Canadian magazines shows the highest degree of craft and promise.

The competition is open to work published during 2012 in either print or digital Canadian magazines. Individuals may enter their own work (see the full requirements here), but editors, art directors and teachers are encouraged to nominate the talented young writers and artists they’ve worked with, even discovered.

Here are just a few reasons we think you might want to enter:

1. It’s only $25 (plus HST) to enter these two categories; a hefty discount on the $95 entry fee for most other National Magazine Awards.

2. Students are encouraged to submit, and the awards are open to work published in college and university magazines as well as any other eligible Canadian magazine.

3. Three finalists will be announced for each award on May 1; they and their work will be promoted in NMAF publications and at the NMA gala.

4. While there is only one entry allowed per person, there is no limit to the number of submissions from a single publication.

5. The winner of each category will be announced on stage at the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7, in a room full of Canada’s top magazine publishers, editors and art directors.

6. For each winner there is a cash prize — $500 – and the right to call yourself a National Magazine Award winner in every bio for the rest of your life!

7. The winner of each category will be recognized on stage at the gala; they and their work will be promoted in NMAF publications, press releases, promotional campaigns — anything and everything we can do to celebrate emerging creative talent in our industry.

8. The winner of Best New Magazine Writer joins a group of award laureates including Matthieu AikinsPatrick White, Chantal Srivastava, Jeremy Klaszus, Jonathan Trudel, Matthew McKinnon, Danielle GroenJean-François Bégin, Sophie Lees, Kris Demeanor and Larry Frolick.

9. The winner of Best New Visual Creator joins 2011 winner The Coveteur and 2009 winner Byron Eggenschwiler, a multiple NMA winner who also designed the creative for the 33rd National Magazine Awards (left).

10. The greatness of Canadian magazines is sustained by the talented, innovative and dynamic young people who love what they do and work hard to do it. At the National Magazine Awards Foundation we, like the rest of the Canadian magazine industry, want to recognize and celebrate this. We can’t do it without you.

Read more about Best New Magazine Writer and Best New Visual Creator. The submissions deadline is January 16, 2013.

2011 National Magazine Awards: What’s new this year?

Starting today you can begin submitting your entries for the 2011 National Magazine Awards. The board of directors for the NMAF has approved the following changes to the awards program for 2011. The changes reflect the input and guidance from various members of our industry who are dedicated to ensuring the NMAF fulfills its mission to recognize and promote excellence in Canadian magazine publishing.
[Version française ici]

1. Expansion of digital magazine participation:
Starting this year, content from digital magazines, companion websites of print magazines and online-only magazines will be eligible in most categories. The NMAF has clarified its guiding principle for what constitutes a digital magazine; please read carefully the Eligibility & Rules page before submitting, as well as the new NMAF Frequently Asked Questions.

Digital magazines (such as tablet editions) are now eligible to enter all categories except Editorial Package and Print Magazine of the Year (they may of course enter the category Digital Magazine of the Year). Eligible magazine websites may enter most written and visual categories. Exclusively digital categories Best Multi-media Feature and Best Digital Design may now be found under integrated and visual categories, respectively. See the full list of categories for details. See our FAQ for more on eligibility of Digital Magazines and Magazine Websites.

2. New visual categories:
The erstwhile Fashion & Beauty category has been divided into two distinct categories. The new category Fashion is open to any fashion layout using photography or illustration. The new category Beauty is open to any beauty layout using photography or illustration.

The former category Conceptual Photography has been renamed Creative Photography with an updated category definition.

The parameters for the categories Illustration and Spot Illustration have changed. All images a half page in size or larger must now be entered in the Illustration category; images smaller than a half page must be entered in Spot Illustration.

The definitions of the categories Homes & Gardens and Photojournalism & Photo Essay have been updated. See the full list of visual categories for complete definitions.

All visual categories other than those for art direction are now open to entries from all eligible digital magazines (such as tablet editions) and magazine websites. Digital magazines may enter their work in the art direction categories. See our FAQ for more on eligibility of Digital Magazines and Magazine Websites.

3. Two categories for emerging magazine talent:
This year there will once again be separate categories for Best New Magazine Writer and Best New Visual Creator. Each is open exclusively to emerging professionals — including students — whose early work in Canadian magazines shows the highest degree of craft and promise. The entry fee for these categories is only $25, and the prize money for the winner of each is $500. Read more about these categories.

4. Adjustments to written categories:
The roster of written categories remains the same; however small changes have been made to the definitions of the categories One of a Kind and Politics & Public Interest in the interest of clarity. Please read through all categories carefully before submitting.

The submissions process for the 2011 National Magazine Awards is now open at www.magazine-awards.com. The deadline for submissions is January 13.

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