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Your Guide to Winter/Spring 2014 Magazine Writing Contests

It’s that time of year again. The calendar has rolled over, winter closes in around you, and all you want to do is write, write, write. The National Magazine Awards Foundation’s annual winter/spring contest guide is back, and in fact bigger than ever, as more Canadian magazines and writers organizations are offering prizes, publication and recognition for great new talent in poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction.

As always, the list below may be incomplete. Leave a comment here, or pull us aside on Twitter (@MagAwards) if you know of any we missed.

Prism International Short Fiction & Poetry Contests
Section: Fiction; Poetry
Deadline: January 23, 2014
Prize: $2000 (1st); $300 (2nd); $200 (3rd); publication
Entry Fee: $35; includes subscription
Detailshttp://prismmagazine.ca/contests/

Matrix Magazine Robert Kroetsch Poetry Award
Section: Fiction; Poetry
Deadline: January 31, 2014
Prize: $500 + publication
Entry Fee: $30
Detailshttp://matrixmagazine.org/rkaward/

Dalhousie Review Short Fiction Contest
Section: Fiction
Deadline: February 1, 2014
Prize: $750 (1st); $250 (2nd); publication
Entry Fee: $30
Detailshttp://dalhousiereview.dal.ca/contest.html

CBC Canada Writes Creative Non-Fiction Prize
Section: Non-fiction (1200-1500 words)
Deadline: February 1, 2014
Prize: $6000 + publication in enRoute + Banff Centre residency (1st); $1000 each to 4 runners up
Entry Fee: $25
Details:
http://www.cbc.ca/books/canadawrites/literaryprizes/nonfiction/index.html

Arc Poetry Magazine Poem of the Year Contest
Section: Poetry
Deadline: February 1, 2014
Prize: $5000
Entry Fee: $32; includes subscription
Detailshttp://arcpoetry.ca/?p=7349

The Malahat Review Novella Prize
Section: Fiction
Deadline: February 1, 2014
Prize: $1500 (1st)
Entry Fee: $35
Detailshttp://web.uvic.ca/malahat/contests/novella_contest/info.html

10th annual Geist Literary Postcard Contest
Section: Very short fiction or non-fiction (500 words)
Deadline: February 1, 2014
Prize: $500 (1st); $250 (2nd); $150 (3rd); publication
Entry Fee: $20; includes subscription
Detailshttp://www.geist.com/articles/postcard-contest/

Atlantic Writing Competition
Sections: Creative Non-fiction; Poetry; Short Fiction; Drama
Deadline: February 3, 2014
Prize: Various
Entry Fee: $20 – $35
Detailshttp://writers.ns.ca/awards-competitions.html

The New Quarterly Nick Blatchford Occasional Verse Contest
Section: Poetry
Deadline: February 28, 2014
Prize: $1000 + publication (1st); other prizes for runners up
Entry Fee: $40 (for first 2 poems; $5 each for additional); includes subscription
Detailshttp://www.tnq.ca/contests

The Capilano Review Poetry Contest
Section: Poetry
Deadline: February 28, 2014
Prize: Three prizes of $250
Entry Fee: $35; includes subscription
Detailshttp://www.thecapilanoreview.ca/contests/

Writers Union of Canada Short Prose Competition
Section: Non-fiction
Deadline: March 1, 2014
Prize: $2500 + assistance with publication
Entry Fee: $29
Detailshttp://www.writersunion.ca/short-prose-competition

Writers’ Trust RBC Bronwen Wallace Award for Emerging Writers
Section: Fiction
Deadline: March 7, 2014
Prize: $5000 (1st); $1000 (each of 2 Honourable Mentions)
Entry Fee: None
Details: Writers’ Trust website

Writers’ Trust Student Non-Fiction Contest
Section: Non-fiction (open to high school students only)
Deadline: March 14, 2014
Prize: $2500 + trip to Toronto (1st); $500 (2nd); $250 (3rd)
Entry Fee: None
Detailshttp://writerstrust.com/students

The New Quarterly Edna Staebler Personal Essay Contest
Section: Non-fiction
Deadline: March 28, 2014
Prize: $1000 + publication
Entry Fee: $40; includes subscription
Detailshttp://www.tnq.ca/contests

Narrative Magazine Winter 2014 Short Story Contest
Sections: Non-fiction and Fiction
Deadline: March 31, 2014
Prize: $2,500 (1st); $1000 (2nd); $500 (3rd); $100 (finalist)
Entry Fee: $22
Detailshttp://www.narrativemagazine.com/node/238622
Notes: Entries may be short fiction or literary nonfiction, including essays, memoirs, or any other form of unpublished manuscript, with a word limit of 15,000. All are judged in the same pool.

Grain magazine Short Grain Writing Contest
Sections: Fiction; Poetry
Deadline: April 1, 2014
Prize: $1000 (1st); $750 (2nd); $500 (3rd); publication
Entry Fee: $35; includes subscription
Detailshttp://www.grainmagazine.ca/contest.html

CV2 2-Day Poem Contest
Sections: Poetry
Deadline: April 4, 2014 (registration; competition is held April 12-13)
Prize: $500 (1st); $300 (2nd); $150 (3rd); publication
Entry Fee: $26; includes subscription
Detailshttp://www.contemporaryverse2.ca/en/contests/2-day-poem-contest

Event magazine Creative Non-Fiction Contest
Section: Non-fiction
Deadline: April 15, 2014
Prize: $1500 in total cash prizes; publication
Entry Fee: $34.95; includes subscription
Detailshttp://eventmags.com/contest-2014/

CBC Canada Writes Poetry Prize
Section: Poetry
Deadline: May 1, 2014
Prize: $6000 + publication in enRoute + Banff Centre residency (1st); $1000 each to 4 runners up
Entry Fee: $25
Detailshttp://www.cbc.ca/books/canadawrites/literaryprizes/poetry/index.html

The Malahat Review Far Horizons Poetry Prize
Section: Poetry
Deadline: May 1, 2014
Prize: $1000
Entry Fee: $25
Detailshttp://web.uvic.ca/malahat/contests/far_horizons_poetry/info.html

Sub-Terrain Lush Triumphant Literary Awards
Sections: Creative Non-fiction; Fiction; Poetry
Deadline: May 15, 2014
Prize: $3000 in total prizes; publication
Entry Fee: $27.50; includes subscription
Detailshttp://subterrain.ca/about/103/lush-2013-awards-open+for+entries

The New Quarterly Peter Hinchcliffe Fiction Award
Section: Fiction
Deadline: May 28, 2014
Prize: $1000 + publication
Entry Fee: $40; includes subscription
Detailshttp://www.tnq.ca/contests

Did we miss one? Send us a note or grab us on Twitter @MagAwards. We’ll update this post throughout the winter and spring as more contests are announced. Others to be announced this spring include the Quebec Writing Competition and Room Magazine contests.

Find more awards, prizes and contests for magazine journalism on the Awards and Contests pages of this blog.

Related Posts:
A Writer’s Guide to Canadian Literary Magazines
Your Guide to Fall Magazine Writing Contests
Your Guide to Summer Magazine Writing Contests

Redesigns for the new issues of Vancouver & Reader’s Digest

Two National Magazine Award-winning titles with a combined 114 years of publishing have unveiled redesigns this month.

Vancouver Magazine, owned by TC Media, debuted a new style for its Jan/Feb 2014 issue.

Most notably, the rounded font with the drop shadow, prominent in the old design (including this cover nominated for a National Magazine Award last year) has been replaced with a sleeker serif design. As for what’s new on the inside, read up on the details of the new VanMag at the Canadian Magazines blog.

And Canada’s Reader’s Digest also has a new look for February 2014.

The new print redesign follows up on the digital redesigns for RD and its French counterpart, Sélection, from last fall. And not just the cover has changed (though note the new miniscule ‘d’ in “digest,” quite a departure from the old design in which that word was the more prominent part of the title). Editor Robert Goyette told Canadian Magazines,

We asked what you liked best about Reader’s Digest and we’re happy to unveil a makeover to enhance your reading experience. From a new logo that emphasizes the “Reader” to an expanded selection of stories, this redesign is tailored to the people who told us they love our content and want more of it.

More:
Reader’s Digest and Vancouver Magazine the NMA Archive
More blog coverage of Magazine Covers & Redesigns

60th anniversary Kenneth R. Wilson Awards open for submissions

The 2013 KRW Awards, at One King West (Photo: Dean Bradley)

Marking 60 years of recognizing excellence in b2b publishing in Canada, the Kenneth R. Wilson Awards is seeking submissions for awards in 25 written, visual, digital and special categories.

The early-bird deadline (save on entry fees) is February 7. Final deadline (including all required hard copies) is February 14.

Submitters are requested to review the categoriesguidelines and helpful tips before submitting.

This year’s 60th anniversary Kenneth R. Wilson Awards gala will be held on June 3 in Toronto, at One King West. More at krwawards.ca.

Each year the competition includes participation from more than one hundred Canadian business-to-business publications. Last year’s major KRW Award winners included OilweekUp Here Business and Marketing.

The 2013 KRW Awards, at One King West (Photo: Dean Bradley)

National Magazine Awards Foundation seeking candidates for paid internship

The National Magazine Awards Foundation (NMAF) is now accepting applications for two (2) paid Administrative Internship positions for the National Magazine Awards (NMAs) and the Kenneth R. Wilson Awards (KRWs) in Toronto for Winter/Spring 2014.

Contract Duration: January 20, 2014—June 30, 2014; 15 hrs/week on average.

Description: The successful candidates will be reporting to and working in consultation with the NMAF/KRW Communications Coordinator and Special Projects Manager and specifically will:

  • Assist with the day-to-day operations of the NMAF/KRW office, including support for the submissions process, judging process, and awards production;
  • Handle some of the office-related communications and outreach with the Canadian magazine industry in both English and French—including but not limited to initiating and responding to phone calls and general email;
  • Assist with the research and production of content for the NMAF blog (blog.magazine-awards.com);
  • Copy edit and fact-check NMAF/KRW communications materials and publications, including newsletters, press releases, website copy, gala programs and related material;
  • Assist with ongoing projects to promote the NMAF/KRW and its various initiatives;
  • Attend regular staff meetings.

Requirements:

  • Exceptional communication skills;
  • Familiarity with the Canadian magazine industry;
  • Ability to work independently and on deadline with goal-oriented projects;
  • Solid writing and editing skills;
  • Knowledge of French an asset;
  • Career aspirations in the Canadian magazine industry or similar;
  • Strong interest in fulfilling the mandate and vision of the National Magazine Awards Foundation.

Terms and Remuneration: The length of the contract will be from January 20, 2013 until June 30, 2014. The average weekly commitment may range from 10 hours per week (Feb-Mar; Jun) to 20 hours per week (Jan; Apr-May). Working hours are flexible except at specific times, and most work may be completed remotely.

Interns will be paid a stipend of $1500 for the duration of the internship, plus receive two (2) tickets to the National Magazine Awards gala on June 6, 2014.

Applications: Candidates should submit

  • A cover letter demonstrating their specific interest in the internship;
  • A resume;
  • And at least one letter of reference from a professor or career mentor.

Please send applications by email to NMAF Communications Coordinator Avary Lovell at staff[at]magazine-awards.com.

Deadline: Tuesday, December 31, 2013.

Ten great reasons to enter the National Magazine Awards

Since 1977 the National Magazine Awards Foundation has been recognizing excellence in the content and creation of Canadian magazines. Each year the Foundation grants more than $60,000 in prize money to award-winning writers, illustrators, photographers and other creators, and bestows the honour and industry recognition of a National Magazine Award  to the publishers, editors, art directors and other staff of more than 75 nominated publications.

And although that may be reason enough to enter, many previous winners are happy to give us more.

Here are 10 other reasons why you should consider entering the 2013 National Magazine Awards:

1. New readers. Award-winning magazines attract new readers who are hungry for great stories.

We did feel that if we were lucky enough to get noticed at the National Magazine Awards in our first year of eligibility it would help us spread the word of what we are about and who we are trying to reach. The NMAs mean a great deal to people in the magazine industry and to writers in general; they indicate what is working at a high level and signal to the country what might be worth paying attention to.
Curtis Gillespie, editor-in-chief of Eighteen Bridges

2. Bragging Rights. Be able to tell your readers that you are delivering the best and most credible content, recognized by your peers in the magazine industry.

It is immensely gratifying, on a professional level, when our team and contributors earn a National Magazine Award, or simply garner a nomination for that matter. It’s yet another measurement of how well we are serving our audience, based on the criteria for magazine excellence as determined by our industry peers.
Patrick Walsh, editor-in-chief of Outdoor Canada

Le plus grand mérite revient au journaliste qui l’écrit, mais le choix du sujet, la révision, le choix des titres et surtout l’encadrement pendant la recherche et la rédaction sont aussi d’une importance capitale et font souvent la différence entre un reportage «publiable» et une œuvre remarquable. Quant à nos lecteurs, ils sont toujours impressionnés de voir notre récolte de prix. Je crois que cela renforce notre crédibilité.
Pascale Millot, ancienne rédactrice du magazine Québec Science

3. Get Noticed. With a National Magazine Award, writers and artists find new audiences for their creative work and talent.

The NMA is a big award and I’m extremely grateful to have won it. I’m sure it has done quite a bit to promote my work and lift my profile as a documentary photographer. Above all else, I’m happy that this award brought the story to more viewers.
Ian Willms, NMA-winning photographer

Winning the NMA gave me confidence in my writing, which I never really had before. [It] also got my work noticed. After I won Best New Magazine Writer, the essay was selected to appear in the Best Canadian Essays 2013 anthology, alongside some very successful writers. It is an amazing honour that I feel would not have happened without the National Magazine Awards.
Sierra Skye Gemma, winner of the 2012 NMA for Best New Magazine Writer

4. Book Deal? Publishers take notice of award-winning work, and a National Magazine Award could be a step towards launching a book project.

The National Magazine Award was crucial into shifting [my] feature into a book project. After the magazine award, I received a few phone calls from literary agents, inquiring about the possibility of a book. I am sure the NMA helped [my agent] in the all-important pitch to book editors and marketing departments; to be able to say the idea had already garnered a Gold Award from the community of magazine journalists.
Joshua Knelman, NMA winner and author of Hot Art

I got a lot of great feedback and everyone at the magazine was effusive and full of praise. It was very validating and it really encouraged me to continue the novel. Or it certainly put a skip in my step as I was finishing the rest of it: knowing that people had taken a peek at it and had approved.
Heather O’Neill, NMA winner and author of Lullabies for Little Criminals

5. Find Your Next Job. Award-winning writers are better able to find new editors and publishers interested in their work.

The impact of this award was stunning. Here I was, writing from an isolated basement office in Vancouver, and all of a sudden my work is being recognized nationally. Personally, it was an unbelievable affirmation that the sacrifices I’d made to leave a twenty-year corporate consulting career had been worth it. Professionally, it was a game changer. The NMA nominations provided me with an entrée into one of the country’s top literary agencies. I met with and acquired [an] agent the day of the awards ceremony. In short, I believe that the recognition of the National Magazine Awards catapulted me from the ground floor of my writing profession to the penthouse suite.
Carol Shaben, NMA winner and author of Into the Abyss

6. Promote Your Innovations. Magazines are growing, and we’re growing with them. The NMAF recognizes achievement in digital content creation and all other enterprising magazine journalism.

It’s a great honour to be recognized by peers who work across subjects and venues in journalism. It seems to be increasingly true that readers can expect good writing and reporting in many places—blogs, web pages, etc.—and it’s wonderful that the NMA recognizes that with its awards categories.
Julia Belluz, winner of the 2012 National Magazine Award for Best Blog

Un prix est le couronnement de nos efforts, la reconnaissance qu’on a atteint notre objectif. Personne ne se sent obligé de lire un magazine pour être au courant de l’actualité. Les journaux, la télévision et les nouvelles en continu sur le Web nous livrent une rude compétition. C’est à nous, artisans des magazines, de proposer des histoires inédites, des angles nouveaux et surprenants pour nous rendre indispensables aux yeux du grand public.
Catherine Dubé, lauréate et journaliste chez L’actualité

7. Build Your Confidence. Freelancing is one of the most challenging pursuits for an artist or journalist, and sometimes even lonely. Awards and nominations are benchmarks of progress.

Whenever I felt that I was hopelessly inept and dark voices inside were telling me to give up, I would defer to other people’s opinions (such as those giving out awards) and carry on. Of course the prize money is helpful in funding the next project, and it is good fun to go to the awards evenings. I don’t think anyone will deny that recognition from your peers is especially gratifying.
Roger LeMoyne, NMA-winning photojournalist

The National Magazine Award was a vote of confidence that I was in the right line of work. We all need a thumbs-up from the world sometimes, as we toil away in the studio.
Jillian Tamaki, NMA-winning illustrator

Winning that NMA was especially rewarding because the story was quite personal. As well, the story had been rejected by numerous magazines before AlbertaViews picked it up. That fact made the win even more gratifying, and dulled the sting from those rejections.
Jeremy Klaszus, NMA-winning writer

8. Celebrate Your Creators. Editors, publishers and art directors have the opportunity to reward the creative talent that helps their magazines sell copies and connect with readers.

An award is useful for communicating to our stakeholders that we are successful. It adds momentum to what we do every day at the magazine… We create content to satisfy our readers, not to win awards. But it is our creators who get the awards and the cash prize, and for an editor, that’s an honour.
Sarah Fulford, editor-in-chief of Toronto Life

9. Even a Nomination is a Celebration. We all start at the beginning, and just getting our work out there, and getting it noticed, is a step on the path to success.

As a young artist, it is a great honour to be recognized nationally, which in turn provides many assurances of support for my career. I was thrilled to be nominated for a National Magazine Award in 2009 even though I only received a honourable mention. Even with greater astonishment, [in 2011] I was called up on stage to receive the Gold award. An award not only provides charming publicity but it raises the standards in my work and, therefore, produces a wonderful opportunity to surpass my previous accomplishments.
Selena Wong, NMA-winning illustrator

Awards are one way to measure whether or not what I’m doing on the page is working… Consistent nominations tell me that I’m continuing to do work that is recognizably among the best in the country.
-J.B. MacKinnon, NMA winner and author of The Once and Future World

10. Believe in What We Do. After all, magazines are the medium of creativity, passion and a deep engagement with our readers.

I think we should always believe in what we do. Successful magazine stories have that ‘wow’ factor, and with everything we do we try to achieve that. You know that story matters, that content matters. If you believe you achieved success then you should enter the National Magazine Awards, because then you’ll know if your peers agree; that it made them say, ‘wow.’
Carole Beaulieu, editor-in-chief of L’actualité

For more information and to submit your work to the 2013 National Magazine Awards, visit magazine-awards.com. Follow us on Twitter @MagAwards.

Call for Submissions: 2013 National Magazine Awards

For the 37th year, the National Magazine Awards Foundation is looking for the best in Canadian magazine publishing. Submissions are now being accepted for awards in 48 categories, recognizing excellence in the creation of written, visual, digital and integrated Canadian magazine content. Cliquez ici pour la version française.

Early-Bird Deadline: January 10, 2014
Final Deadline: January 15, 2014

All Categories
Rules
FAQs
Magazine of the Year
Best New Magazine Writer
Best New Illustrator or Photographer
Co-Financing

What’s New This Year?
The NMAF has created a new category this year—Infographics—rewarding an original creation of data visualization produced by a magazine, print or digital. Entries may consist of a single infographic or a series of related infographics appearing in a single article. Read more

We’ve Moved – Again!
When you’re sending in your hard copies–after you complete the online registration–be sure to note our new address:

2300 Yonge Street, Suite 1600, Toronto, ON, M4P 1E4

Digital Magazine Publishing
Content from Magazine Websites and Tablet Magazines is eligible in most categories, including dedicated digital categories Blogs, Editorial Package: Web, Online Video, Magazine Website of the Year and Tablet Magazine of the YearRead more

More information:
magazine-awards.com
Ready to submit:
submissions.magazine-awards.com
Version française:
magazine-prix.com
Questions?
staff@magazine-awards.com

NMAF welcomes three new directors for 2013-2014

The National Magazine Awards Foundation is pleased to welcome three new members to its Board of Directors for 2013-2014.

Theresa Ebden is the director of media and analyst relations (Canada) at Accenture and a former journalist with The Globe and Mail, Toronto Star, Business News Network and others.

Steve Maich is the senior vice-president of publishing at Rogers Media, prior to which he was the founding editor-in-chief and publisher of Sportsnet, and group publisher of Rogers consumer business magazines.

Dominique Ritter is the managing editor of Reader’s Digest, former editor-in-chief of various titles at Spafax Canada and a freelance writer and editor.

“On behalf of the NMAF I am pleased to welcome Theresa Ebden, Dominique Ritter and Steve Maich to our board of directors for 2013-2014.The volunteer members of the NMAF board support the mission of Foundation to recognize and promote excellence in Canadian magazine content. The board serves as guides in fulfilling our mandate to support a vibrant Canadian magazine industry. On behalf of my fellow members of the board, I’m grateful for their important service to our industry and I am pleased to have these three new members join us for an exciting year ahead.”
Douglas Thomson, president of the NMAF

The NMAF would also like to thank its outgoing directors for 2013: Sarah Moore, managing editor at Star Content Studios, and Robert Goyette, vice-president and editor-in-chief of Reader’s Digest.

Mag of the Year Corporate Knights prints on wheat straw

Canada’s reigning Magazine of the Year Corporate Knights is not resting on its laurels. According to a story in Masthead Online, the magazine’s latest issue is printed on 60% wheat straw “paper,” which its editor Tyler Hamilton says may be a more sustainable product to meet printing needs in the future.

The latest issue of the magazine features American actor and entrepreneur Woody Harrelson, one of the founders of Manitoba-based Prairie Paper Ventures, which produces the wheat straw stock.

Read the story over at Masthead Online.

Related post:
Get to know Corporate Knights, Canada’s Magazine of the Year

Award-winning online magazine Hazlitt moves into print

The most decorated online magazine at this year’s National Magazine Awards is publishing a print product. Hazlitt, winner of 3 Gold National Magazine Awards–including the prestigious Magazine Website of the Year–at the 2012 NMA gala this past June, announced this week that it is launching a print edition.

Hazlitt No. 1 (Winter 2014) will be on magazine racks this month and, completing a full circle, will also have an electronic version. According to the publisher, Random House Canada, Hazlitt No. 1 collects some of the greatest hits and seminal tracks previously published on the website alongside newly commissioned work.

Launched as an online magazine in August 2012, Hazlitt won the National Magazine Awards for Best Magazine Website Design and Best Online Video, in addition to Magazine Website of the Year, at the 36th annual NMA gala this past June, its first year of eligibility.

The new print title features work by National Magazine Award winners and nominees Lynn Crosbie, Michael Winter, Billie Livingston, Sarah Nicole Prickett, Alexandra Molotkow and more.

Read Hazlitt’s press release.

More:
Meet the Finalists for Magazine Website of the Year
Meet the Finalists for Best Online Video

Going for Gold: How to win a National Magazine Award

At last June’s MagNet magazines conference in Toronto, a golden panel of industry experts gathered to present a session called “Going for Gold: How to Create Award-Winning Content,” moderated by Deborah Rosser, president of Rosser & Associates.

The panellists were:

  • Carole Beaulieu, publisher and editor-in-chief of L’actualité, winner of more than 50 National Magazine Awards since she became EIC in 1998;
  • Sarah Fulford, editor-in-chief of Toronto Life, the most-nominated magazine at last year’s NMAs and former winner of Magazine of the Year (2007);
  • David Hayes, freelance writer (nominated for 14 NMAs during his career, winning a gold and a silver award) and member of the board of directors of the National Magazine Awards Foundation (NMAF);
  • Domenic Macri, art director at Report on Business and winner of 6 NMAs for his design and creative direction;
  • Patrick Walsh, editor-in-chief and brand manager of Outdoor Canada, winner of 21 National Magazine Awards since 1987, and former president of the NMAF.

Risk and Reward: The moderator began by asking each of the panellists to present the story of a challenging piece that won a National Magazine Award, and what lessons they took from the experience.

2008_torontolife2Sarah Fulford spoke about how breaking the rules helped Toronto Life to a surprise NMA win for best magazine cover of 2008. Sarah said she and her then art director Jessica Rose, whom she hired with this specific challenge in mind, took big risks on a cover about gun violence in Toronto, as they bucked the conventions for cover design with small cover lines and other elements reflecting thinking outside the box. The issue sold well on the newsstand and also impressed the NMA judges that year, as they gave it a Gold.

Domenic Macri spoke in a similar vein about a magazine cover that won Gold the following year, 2009, at the NMAs. The Julie Dickson cover presented a challenge because the editors had agreed not to put her portrait on the magazine cover. Domenic showed the audience several of his drafts and mockups that he went through on his way to finally developing the final cover, saying that what he learned from the experience was although there are certain elements required of a good cover, “you don’t have to take the same approach all the time. I think we won the award because we came up with new directions, and because of the words.”

David Hayes mentioned an episode from 1990 when a feature story he’d written for Toronto Life wasn’t entered for an NMA that year, and after talking with his editor, who said he wasn’t able to enter the piece that year due to budget constraints, he learned that he could enter the NMAs himself. Several years later he took that experience to heart when he again discovered that an editor wouldn’t enter his story, so he entered it himself and it ended up winning Gold. “You never know what the jury will decide,” he reminded the audience, “so as a writer if you are proud of your work you should enter it.”

Patrick Walsh described the story of a controversial article he commissioned about the death of a hunter in Newfoundland, called “Another Fine Day Afield.” As an editor he felt that the story hadn’t been covered well in other media, and though it would be a legal, financial and editorial challenge to pursue the story for Outdoor Canada, he decided to take the risk. The risk paid off when the magazine story he published was picked up by CBC’s The Fifth Estate and NBC’s Inside Edition, and his writer Charles Wilkins won a Gold National Magazine Award in Sports & Recreation.

Carole Beaulieu also touted the benefits of taking risks and believing in the work you produce. She talked about a piece from last year she commissioned from a writer about Pauline Marois. Although Quebec news had been saturated with stories about the premier, Carole felt there was room for more if they could find the right angle and give it the right depth. She sent her writer to spend time with Mdm Marois at her hairdresser’s, achieving a kind of intimate portrait not yet seen, and L’actualité created a newsprint insert–what it is now calling a “mini-book” and making a semi-regular feature for the magazine–to accommodate the 16-page story. And at this year’s NMAs, “L’éttoffe d’un premier ministre,” by journalist Noémi Mercier, won Gold in Profiles.

Quote-Unquote: On the significance of winning a National Magazine Award and why we strive for award-winning content.

Sarah: “An award is useful for communicating to our stakeholders that we are successful. It adds momentum to what we do every day at the magazine… We create content to satisfy our readers, not to win awards. But it is our creators who get the awards and the cash prize, and for an editor, that’s an honour.”

David: “As writers, what we have is our reputation, and what we create should stand on its own. Awards are a feather in your cap, not the cap itself.”

Patrick: “We won because the story was beautifully written, because it was longform [5000 words]… We also took risks and winning the award was a measure of that.”

Carole: “I think we should always believe in what we do. Successful magazine stories have that ‘wow’ factor, and with everything we do we try to achieve that. You know that story matters, that content matters. If you believe you achieved success then you should enter, because then you’ll know if your peers [the jury] agree; that it made them say, ‘wow.’”

The Bottom Line: The moderator asked each panellist to distill one piece of advice for winning a National Magazine Award.

Domenic: Strive for strong collaboration between editorial and art in creating your content. Success is a product of a strong team.

Carole: Don’t take things too seriously. Trust your instincts and never give up on a great story.

Sarah: The most successful pieces are the ones where the creators were passionate and took risks.

Patrick: Be strategic, because the more you enter the more you are likely to win. If your aim is to win awards then enter as much as you can.

David: Advice to writers: write well. And advice to editors: hire writers who write well.

In Summary: Accept challenges, take risks, think differently, be passionate, find (or be) the best creator, work together, never give up on a good story, believe in your work and enter as much as you can. That, and always strive for the ‘wow’ factor! 

On behalf of the Canadian magazine industry, thank you to the panellists for sharing your wisdom.

Related posts:
Off the Page, with Patrick Walsh
National Magazine Award-winning Covers, 2007-2010
Winners of the 36th National Magazine Awards

More:
Award-winning work in the National Magazine Awards archive
National Magazine Awards digital Gold Book (free)

A Writer’s Guide to Canadian Literary Magazines & Journals

They publish much of Canada’s best poetry and prose. The writers whose creative work appears in their pages range from established icons of Canadian literary arts–such as Alice Munro, Margaret Atwood and 2013 Giller Prize winner Lynn Coady, to name just a few–to new writers published for the first time.

They are Canada’s literary magazines, and they are not only a source of reading pleasure, but also a critical part of our country’s culture and a forum for literary artists across the land.

The following list, an A-to-Z guide to Canadian literary periodicals and their submissions guidelines, compiled by the National Magazine Awards Foundation, focuses on those magazines that currently publish short fiction, poetry and/or creative (aka literary) non-fiction. Many also accept submissions for essays, literary criticism, reviews, interviews, graphic narratives and visual arts. And many have won National Magazine Awards.

Acta Victoriana
Published in: Ontario (Victoria University, Toronto)
Founded: 1878
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Visual Arts
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Award Nominations: None
Submissions Guidelines

Antigonish Review, The
Published in: Nova Scotia (St. Francis Xavier University)
Founded: 1970
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Essays, Articles, Reviews
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Award Nominations: 1
Submissions Guidelines

Arc Poetry Magazine
Published in: Ontario (Ottawa)
Founded: 1978
Genres: Poetry, Reviews, Essays
Issues per Year: 3
National Magazine Awards: 4 (most recently: Matthew Holmes, Gold, Poetry, 2011)
NMA Nominations: 18
Submission Guidelines

Brick
Published in: Ontario (Toronto)
Founded: 1977
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction
Issues per Year: 2
National Magazine Awards: 4 (most recently: Patrick deWitt, Silver, Fiction, 2012)
NMA Nominations: 10
Submission Guidelines

Canadian Notes & Queries
Published in: Ontario (Windsor)
Founded: 1968
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Reviews, Essays
Issues per Year: 2
National Magazine Awards: 1 (most recently: Caroline Adderson, Gold, Fiction, 2012)
NMA Nominations: 3
Submission Guidelines

Capilano Review, The
Published in: British Columbia (Capilano University, Vancouver)
Founded: 1972
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Reviews, Visual Arts, Interviews
Issues per Year: 3
National Magazine Awards: 4 (most recently: Weyman Chan, Silver, Poetry, 2001)
NMA Nominations: 12
Submission Guidelines

Carousel
Published in: Ontario (University of Guelph)
Founded: 1983
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Visual Arts
Issues per Year: 2
National Magazine Awards: 1 (Julie Bruck, Gold, Poetry, 1998)
NMA Nominations: 3
Submission Guidelines

Carte Blanche
Published in: Quebec (Quebec Writers’ Federation, Montreal)
Founded: 2004
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction, Visual Arts
Issues per Year: 2
National Magazine Awards Nominations: None
Submission Guidelines

Contemporary Verse 2
Published in: Manitoba (Winnipeg)
Founded: 1975
Genres: Poetry, Reviews, Interviews
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Awards Nominations: 2
Submission Guidelines

Dalhousie Review, The
Published in: Nova Scotia (Dalhousie University, Halifax)
Founded: 1921
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Reviews, Essays
Issues per Year: 3
National Magazine Awards Nominations: None
Submission Guidelines

Descant
Published in: Ontario (Toronto)
Founded: 1970
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Esssays, Memoirs, Visual Arts
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Awards: 6 (most recently: Adam Lindsay Honsinger, Silver, Fiction 2009)
NMA Nominations: 17
Submission Guidelines

Dorchester Review, The
Published in: Ontario (Ottawa)
Founded: 2011
Genres: Reviews, Essays, Translations
Issues per Year: 2
National Magazine Awards Nominations: None
Submission Guidelines

Event
Published in: British Columbia (Douglas College)
Founded: 1971
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Reviews, Creative Non-fiction
Issues per Year: 3
National Magazine Awards: 12 (most recently: Bill Gaston, Gold, Fiction, 2011)
NMA Nominations: 42
Submission Guidelines

Existere
Published in: Toronto (York University)
Founded: 1978
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Reviews, Creative Non-fiction, Visual Arts
Issues per Year: 2
National Magazine Awards Nominations: None
Submission Guidelines

Exit, revue de poésie
Published in: Quebec (Montreal)
Founded: 1995
Genres: Poetry, Reviews
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Awards Nominations: None
Submission Guidelines

Feathertale Review, The
Published in: Ontario (Ottawa)
Founded: 2008
Genres: Humour, Fiction, Creative Non-fiction, Poetry, Cartoons
Issues per Year: 2
National Magazine Awards: 3 (most recently: Cathal Kelly, Silver, Humour, 2012)
NMA Nominations: 4
Submission Guidelines

Fiddlehead, The
Published in: New Brunswick (University of New Brunswick, Fredericton)
Founded: 1945
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Reviews
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Awards: 2 (most recently: Shane Neilson, Silver, Poetry, 2011)
NMA Nominations: 12
Submission Guidelines

filling Station
Published in: Alberta (Calgary)
Founded: 1993
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction, Reviews, Interviews, Visual Arts
Issues per Year: 3
National Magazine Award Nominations: 1
Submissions Guidelines

Geist
Published in: British Columbia (The Geist Foundation, Vancouver)
Founded: 1990
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Awards: 5 (most recently: Karen Connelly, Gold, Poetry, 2012)
NMA Nominations: 12
Submission Guidelines

Grain
Published in: Saskatchewan (Sask. Writers’ Guild, Saskatoon)
Founded: 1973
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Awards: 4 (most recently: Ayelet Tsabari, Silver, One of a Kind, 2012)
NMA Nominations: 24
Submission Guidelines

Lettres québécoises
Published in
: Quebec (Montreal)
Founded: 1976
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Reviews, Interviews
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Awards Nominations: None
Submission Guidelines

Literary Review of Canada, The
Published in: Ontario (Toronto)
Founded: 1991
Genres: Poetry, Essays, Reviews, Interviews
Issues per Year: 10
National Magazine Awards Nominations: 6
Submission Guidelines

Malahat Review, The
Published in: British Columbia (University of Victoria)
Founded: 1967
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction, Reviews
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Awards: 26 (most recently: Shane Rhodes, Gold, Poetry, 2010)
NMA Nominations: 78
Submission Guidelines

Matrix
Published in: Quebec (Concordia University, Montreal)
Founded: 1975
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction, Reviews
Issues per Year: 2
National Magazine Award Nominations: None
Submissions Guidelines

New Quarterly, The
Published in: Ontario (St. Jerome’s University, Waterloo)
Founded: 1981
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction, Reviews, Interviews
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Awards: 14 (most recently: Sierra Skye Gemma, Gold, Best New Magazine Writer, 2012)
NMA Nominations: 44
Submission Guidelines

Plenitude
Published in: British Columbia (Victoria)
Founded: 2012
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction, Graphic Narrative
Issues per Year: 2
National Magazine Award Nominations: None
Submissions Guidelines

Prairie Fire
Published in: Manitoba (Winnipeg)
Founded: 1978
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction, Interviews
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Awards: 13 (most recently: Sue Goyette, Silver, Poetry, 2012)
NMA Nominations: 41
Submission Guidelines

PRISM International
Published in: British Columbia (University of British Columbia)
Founded: 1959
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction, Drama, Interviews
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Awards: 10 (most recently: Jennica Harper, Silver, Poetry, 2008)
NMA Nominations: 22
Submission Guidelines

Queen’s Quarterly
Published in: Ontario (Queen’s University, Kingston)
Founded: 1893
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Essays, Reviews
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Awards: 11 (most recently: Nick Mount, Silver, Arts & Entertainment, 2008)
NMA Nominations: 44
Submission Guidelines

Ricepaper
Published in: British Columbia (Vancouver)
Founded: 1995
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction, Visual Arts
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Awards Nominations: 5
Submission Guidelines

Riddle Fence
Published in: Newfoundland & Labrador
Founded: 2009
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction, Visual Arts
Issues per Year: 3
National Magazine Awards Nominations: None
Submission Guidelines

Room
Published in: British Columbia (Vancouver)
Founded: 1975
Genres: Poetry, Fiction, Creative Non-fiction, Interviews, Visual Arts
Issues per Year: 4
National Magazine Awards Nominations: None
Submission Guidelines

sub-Terrain
Published in: British Columbia (Vancouver)
Founded: 1992
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction, Reviews, Visual Arts
Issues per Year: 3
National Magazine Awards Nominations: 1
Submission Guidelines

Taddle Creek
Published in: Ontario (Toronto)
Founded: 1997
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction, Visual Arts
Issues per Year: 2
National Magazine Awards: 1 (Michael Cho, Silver, Words & Pictures, 2007)
NMA Nominations: 12
Submission Guidelines

Vallum
Published in: Quebec (Montreal)
Founded: 2000
Genres: Poetry, Reviews, Essays, Interviews
Issues per Year: 2
National Magazine Awards Nominations: 5
Submission Guidelines

Windsor Review
Published in: Ontario (University of Windsor)
Founded: 1965
Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Non-fiction, Interviews, Visual Arts
Issues per Year: 2
National Magazine Awards Nominations: None
Submission Guidelines

XYZ, La Revue
Published in: Quebec (Ville Saint-Laurent)
Founded: 1985
Genres: Fiction, Reviews, Interviews
Issues per Year: 3
National Magazine Awards Nominations: None
Submission Guidelines

In addition to the above list, many of Canada’s news, general-interest and arts magazines publish fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction, including but not limited to Border Crossings, The Walrus, This Magazine, Maisonneuve, Eighteen Bridges, Toronto LifeBoulderpavement, Worn Fashion Journal, Inroads, Newfoundland Quarterly, Ottawa Magazine, Georgia Strait, Alberta Views, Hazlitt, Nouveau projet, Broken Pencil.

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Frontier College hosts fundraiser with NMA winner JJ Lee

On Saturday, November 9 in Vancouver, Frontier College and the Raindance Festival for Independent Authors will host a fundraiser reception with National Magazine Award-winning writer JJ Lee.

According to the organizers, the reception is open to the public and will appeal to readers and writers alike. JJ Lee will answer questions, sign books, talk about the life of a full-time writer and share his observations of the Canadian publishing industry. Net proceeds will be donated to Frontier College to help fund literacy initiatives in British Columbia.

The event will be held at Earl’s Restaurant in Richmond’s Lansdowne Centre from 4 to 6 pm on Saturday, November 9. Tickets are $20 each ($25 at the door) and include an appetizer and beverage.

Founded in 1899, Frontier College is Canada’s original literacy organization and a charitable organization that recruits and trains volunteers to deliver literacy programs to children, youth and adults in communities across the country.

JJ Lee won a Gold National Magazine Award in 2011 for Best Short Feature (Elle Canada). His recent memoir, The Measure of a Man: The Story of a Father, a Son and a Suit (McClelland & Stewart), was a finalist for the Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction, the B.C. Book Prize for Non-Fiction, the Hillary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Literary Non-Fiction, and the Governor General’s Literary Awards.

More: JJ Lee in the National Magazine Awards archive

Alberta Magazine Awards open for submissions

The Alberta Magazine Publishers Association is accepting submissions for the 2014 Alberta Magazine Awards, with a deadline of December 16 for all entries (December 2 for the early-bird rate).

They’ve added some new categories this year: The expanded 2014 program includes new awards categories for Photograph (Landscape, Still Life and Architecture), Photograph (People and Portraiture), and Magazine of the Year.

The awards are open to AMPA members only, except for two awards open to the general public: Emerging Writer and Best New Magazine.

Overall there are 16 Showcase Awards (for written, visual, integrated and digital content) and 5 Achievement Awards (Achievement in Publishing, Editor of the Year, Volunteer of the Year, Best New Magazine, Magazine of the Year).

Check out the full line-up of awards and download the 2014 Alberta Magazine Awards Information document for more info.

The 2014 Alberta Magazine Awards will be presented at a gala dinner that kicks-off the Alberta Magazines Conference on March 20, 2014 at the Carriage House Inn, Calgary.

Call for Judges: The 37th annual National Magazine Awards

This year the Canadian magazine industry will celebrate the 37th annual National Magazine Awards. Submissions open on December 1 for awards in 48 categories, and we are looking for volunteer judges to serve on our juries for these categories.

Each year the National Magazine Awards Foundation relies on the generously donated time and expertise of over 200 volunteer judges, who sit on three-member peer juries for our written, visual, integrated and special awards.

Ideal candidates should fulfill one or more of the following criteria:

  • Editor, art director, publisher, web editor or other staff member (past or present) of a Canadian magazine, whether or not your publication participates in the National Magazine Awards (naturally you cannot serve as a judge in a category where your magazine is entered, but potentially in other categories);
  • Freelance or staff writer, illustrator, photographer or digital creator, where a significant portion of your work is in Canadian magazines (especially if you have been nominated for or won a National Magazine Award yourself);
  • Journalist with expertise in a particular field represented by one or more NMA categories (such as health, business, science, sports, travel, lifestyle, food, finance, poetry, etc);
  • Bilingual (obviously not all of our judges need be bilingual, but all written categories are judged by both unilingual and bilingual juries, and most other categories include one or more bilingual members on their juries).

For more information, review the NMAF’s Judging Process on our website, as well as the Eligibility & Rules and Previous Judges.

To submit yourself or a colleague as a candidate to judge, please contact the NMAF at staff [at] magazine-awards.com. Please include your name, contact information and a brief bio or summary of your expertise.

National Magazine Awards named one of Toronto’s top events

The NMA Gala at The Carlu. (Photo by Dean Bradley)

Bizbash, the monthly magazine and event-industry resource, has named this year’s 36th annual National Magazine Awards one of the top 100 events in Toronto for 2013.

The National Magazine Awards gala, held on June 7 at The Carlu and hosted by Zaib Shaikh, drew more than 500 guests from the Canadian magazine industry for dinner and a presentation of awards in 47 categories.

Bizbash named the NMA gala as the #4 event among media and literary events, and #45 overall for 2013. Read more.

Related posts:
The Winners of the 36th annual National Magazine Awards
Photos from the 36th annual National Magazine Awards
Opening video from the 36th annual National Magazine Awards

CSME event promises to help you supercharge your email skills

[Update: CSME has cancelled this event per a note on their website, but invites members to drop them a note to request the topic again in future.]

The Canadian Society of Magazine Editors (CSME) is hosting a mixer next Tuesday, October 22, at the CSI Annex Cafe in Toronto. The event promises to help you “supercharge your email management skills” and features William Tully, a Technical Business Analyst for Metroland Media Digital Commerce.

Join CSME and speaker William Tully for our first mixer of the season to socialize, have some drinks and snacks and get secrets to owning your inbox once and for all. Topics to be covered include how to use folders and filters, deleting vs. archiving, email etiquette, and how to never again lose a message or attachment.

Details:
When: Tuesday, October 22, 6 pm to 8 pm
Where: CSI Annex, 720 Bathurst St. (south of Bloor), ING presentation room
How much: $10 for members, $25 for non-members ($15 and $30 at the door) – includes one drink ticket and hors d’oeuvres

More info and tickets at CSME.

Charles Oberdorf Memorial Award winner announced

[This post has been updated] Congratulations to Ryerson University student Angie Mattison, winner of the second annual Charles Oberdorf Memorial Award for excellence in magazine and web publishing. The $1000 prize was created in 2011 by the friends and family of Charles Oberdorf, for eighteen years a teacher at Ryerson and the coordinator of the magazine and web publishing program at the Chang School for Continuing Education.

Mr. Oberdorf was the recipient of the 2010 2007 National Magazine Awards Foundation’s Outstanding Achievement award, for his career of service to the Canadian magazine industry.

Hat tip: Canadian Magazines blog.

Ryerson Journalism School marks 60th anniversary

rrj-3Ryerson University’s venerable School of Journalism will celebrate its 60th anniversary this weekend in Toronto, with a reception Friday evening and a conference of panel sessions on Saturday.

The Friday event, called Journalism on the Rocks, will honour 12 alumni of the journalism program, including 3-time National Magazine Award winner and longtime Ryerson faculty member Don Obe. Other inductees into what the school is calling its Journalism Headliners include the late sports journalist Randy Starkman, Zarqa Nawaz, creator of the TV series Little Mosque on the Prairie, and Shelley Ambrose, co-publisher of The Walrus.

Saturday’s panel sessions will focus on Ryerson and Journalism: The Next 60 Years, featuring National Magazine Award-winning Ryerson alums Julia Belluz and Elizabeth Renzetti, as well as a number of other remarkable journalists.

It would be almost impossible to calculate how many Ryerson alumni and faculty have won National Magazine Awards or edited NMA-winning stories, but there’s no doubt the program has had a deep and meaninful impact on the Canadian magazine industry. Its highly regarded, student-run Ryerson Review of Journalism has won 6 National Magazine Awards from 30 nominations since it was founded in 1984.

Congratulations Ryerson School of Journalism on 60 great years and many more to come.

MagsBC offers workshops on video production

MagsBCLast year’s National Magazine Awards introduced a new category for Online Video, open to any single video produced by a magazine companion website or online only magazine. As more magazines look to boost online audiences and support creators through diverse digital projects, the new award recognizes these innovations in the Canadian magazine industry.

Similarly, the Magazine Association of British Columbia is offering two workshops — the first tonight, the second next Thursday, October 10 — on “Shooting, editing and uploading to the Web,” targeting magazine professionals who are “interested in attracting more readers and viewers, and expanding your skills and your magazine’s online presence by providing media content.”

The evening workshops, held at Langara College, are open to all magazine professionals, either as a staff member or a freelancer, as well as post-secondary students in publishing and journalism programs.

More info here.

Covet, Prairie Fire, Canada’s History top winners at Manitoba Magazine Awards

Covet, the new lifestyle magazine tagged as “modern living with a Prairie twist,” won the award for Magazine of the Year at last week’s Manitoba Magazine Awards, a.k.a. the Maggies. Covet, which launched in 2012, also won the People’s Choice Award.

The literary periodical Prairie Fire, winner of 13 National Magazine Awards since 1995, took home the most Maggies with four, including Best Poem, Best Short Fiction, Best Editorial Feature or Creative Non-Fiction, and Best Single Issue.

Canada’s History magazine won for Best Column or Department and Best Digital Initiative, the latter for its Young Students program which encourages students to make short documentary films for online publication.

Also winning Maggies were The Huddle, Interlake Arts, Manitoba Home & Gardener Living, Rhubarb, Outwords Inc, and the Canadian Journal of Green Building & Design.

The the Maggies were introduced in 2009 by the Manitoba Magazine Publishers Association to recognize achievement in all areas of the magazine publishing business: editorial excellence, design, marketing, online development and public events and programming. The Awards also provide an opportunity to celebrate the exceptional range and diversity of magazine titles produced in the province.

A Brief History of Magazines in First Covers

Ernest Hemingway wrote a story for the inaugural issue of Esquire in 1933. The debut of Rolling Stone in ’67 featured John Lennon in military garb. Gracing the first cover of People in 1974 was Mia Farrow, promoting her new film “The Great Gatsby” (deja vu?).

Recently the blog at The Week put up 17 first covers of famous American magazines, including Time (1923), Newsweek (then News-Week, 1933), Life (1936), New York (1968) and Wired (1993).

On February 21, 1925, Eustace Tilley came to life as a cover icon for The New Yorker (note the cover price: 15 cents. In 1965 it was 25 cents; in 1991, $1.75; and today, $6.99).

The first cover photo of Sports Illustrated in 1954 featured a swinging Eddie Matthews (career stats: .271 batting average, 512 home runs, 2 World Series titles, debuted for the Boston Braves, before they moved to Milwaukee and then Atlanta, and long after they were known as the Boston Beaneaters).

And how about that first cover of The Atlantic Monthly., which sent its first issue to press in 1857 to crowd the newsstands with Harper’s, which had launched seven years earlier.

Check out all 17 covers and their stories.

A couple of years ago the Magazines Canada blog started posting first covers of Canadian magazines, featuring National Magazine Award winners like The Beaver (1920), Chatelaine (1928), The Fiddlehead (1945), THIS Magazine (1966), Cottage Life (1988), The Walrus (2003) and more.

Canadian Dimension hosts Chris Hedges in Toronto

This Friday, September 20 in Toronto Canadian Dimension magazine is hosting an evening with Pulitzer Prize-winning American journalist Chris Hedges.

A former 15-year foreign correspondent for The New York Times, winner of the Amnesty International Global Award for Human Rights Journalism, and author of a recent cover story in The Walrus, Mr. Hedges is the author of the new book The World As it Is: Dispatches on the Myth of Human Progress

He famously sued the Obama administration last year over the constitutionality of the National Defense Authorization Act, and won.

Tickets for the Toronto event are available but nearly gone. A note on the site states that a few tickets are on sale via EventBrite or at Another Story Bookshop (315 Roncesvalles Avenue in Toronto).

Canadian Dimensions is an independent Canadian magazine with a global focus, founded in 1963 in Winnipeg. In 2005 it was nominated for a National Magazine Award for “The Battle for Canadian Universities.”

Maclean’s, Toronto Life, Hazlitt headline COPA finalists

The companion sites of Maclean’s and Toronto Life magazines will vie with those of Chatelaine, Today’s Parent and Spacing for the title of Best Overall Companion Website at this year’s Canadian Online Publishing Awards, the finalists for which were announced earlier today.

Maclean’s was tabbed for 8 nominations in 15 categories in the COPAs’ Red Division, which consists of consumer magazines (print and online). Toronto Life garnered 4 nominations, including Best Website Design, Best Smartphone App and Best Mobile-Optimized Site.

Hazlitt, the online-only literary publication which earlier this year won the National Magazine Awards for Magazine Website of the Year, Magazine Website Design and Best Online Video, is nominated for 4 COPAs, including Best Overall Online-Only Publication Website, where it will compete against RedNation Online, Torontoist, Tuja Wellness, and What’s Really Good Magazine.

Hazlitt is also nominated for a COPA in Best Website Design, Best Blog and Best Online-Only Article. The online-only city mag Torontoist also nabbed 4 nominations in total.

In the category for Best Tablet Edition, the nominees are Maclean’s, Best Health, Clin d’oeil, Canadian Living and Travel + Escape. And for Best Smartphone App, Maclean’s and Toronto Life will compete against Cool! and YoyoMama.

Check out all of this year’s nominees, including those in the Blue (trade publications) and Green (newspaper & broadcast media) divisions.

This year’s COPA winners will be announced on November 13 at a soiree at The Hoxton in Toronto. Ticket and event info here.

Call for Participants: NMAF Round Table on Eligibility & Judging

[This post has been updated] Each autumn the NMAF convenes one or more Round-Table discussions with members of the industry to help us ensure we are representing the needs of our stakeholders.

On Thursday, September 26 [Update: at 2:30pm] in Toronto the National Magazine Awards Foundation (NMAF) will host an industry Round-Table discussion concerning its policies on magazine eligibility and its judging process. All stakeholders and representatives of participating magazines are invited attend, but must RSVP not later than Friday, September 20.

Agenda: The NMAF has proposed two general topics for discussion and feedback; however, we also invite attendees to table other questions, concerns and ideas regarding the policies, procedures and roles of the NMAF in the magazine industry.

  1. Magazine Eligibility: What defines a magazine and who may participate in the National Magazine Awards?
  2. Digital Magazines & Content: Is the NMAF serving the needs of the industry and representing relevant creators?

Participants: Members of the NMAF Board of Directors and Judging Committee will join industry representatives for a 90-minute open discussion. Ideal participants will fulfill one or more of the following criteria:

  • General familiarity with NMAF’s operations, stakeholders and roles in the Canadian magazine industry;
  • Prior service as an NMA judge, particularly judges who’ve participated in multiple years and/or multiple categories;
  • Interest in / experience with being involved with the broad issues of the NMAF and the Canadian magazine industry at large;
  • Working in / knowledge of digital magazine production or digital aspect of the magazine industry;
  • General seniority or prominence in the industry;
  • Representation from a variety of participating magazines, magazine companies, and geographic regions of Canada.

Participants from outside Toronto may attend via teleconference. Participants in Toronto are encouraged to attend in person.

Those interested to attend should please contact NMAF Special Projects Manager Richard Johnson not later than Friday, September 20.

Email: richard.johnson [at] magazine-awards.com

Confirmed participants will receive a detailed agenda and other event information by Monday, September 23.

Walrus editor talks about mag’s 10-year anniversary

[THIS POST HAS BEEN UPDATED] Earlier this week John Macfarlane, editor and co-publisher of The Walrus, spoke with Masthead about his magazine’s tenth anniversary, which it is celebrating throughout 2013 but in particular with its special anniversary issue coming out later this month.

After discussing things like the new issue, the magazine’s first decade and talk of his retirement, Macfarlane sounded an optimistic note at the end when asked about where The  Walrus will be in another ten years:

Right off the bat, I’ll say I think The Walrus will be here 10 years from now doing what it’s currently doing. I also think there will still be a print edition, although some of the print audience might have migrated to other platforms. It’s hard to say at the moment because we’re all in this fog and finding it difficult to see into the future very clearly. I think and hope that paid circulation will have increased, on whatever platforms. I hope that The Walrus continues to become a better and better magazine, and I don’t see why that won’t happen, since that’s what we come in here every day to do. I don’t see that culture changing.

Read the entire interview here.

Since it was founded in September 2003, The Walrus has won 99 National Magazine Awards (64 Gold, 35 Silver), more than any other Canadian publication.

UPDATE: This past Saturday’s Globe and Mail had a good article on The Walrus reaching the 10-year mark in the context of its evolving business model.

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