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Announcing the Winners of the 37th annual National Magazine Awards!

The National Magazine Awards Foundation (NMAF) is pleased to announce the winners of the 37th annual National Magazine Awards.

At this year’s gala on June 6, presented by CDS Global and hosted by humourist (and award-winner) Scott Feschuk, the NMAF presented Gold and Silver awards in 47 categories representing the best in Canadian magazines from the year 2013.

Complete list (PDF) of all winners
Full-text of all nominated and winning articles
Twitter highlights
La version française

SPECIAL AWARD WINNERS

Magazine of the Year
Sponsored by RBC Royal Bank
Cottage Life

Magazine Website of the Year
Macleans.ca
14720

Tablet Magazine of the Year
Sportsnet

Best New Magazine Writer
Sponsored by Reader’s Digest Foundation
Catherine McIntyre

Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement
Kim Jernigan

Top Winning Magazines at the 37th National Magazine Awards:

Magazine Gold Silver HM
The Walrus 7 6 22
Maclean’s 4 1 13
Maisonneuve 4 1 9
L’actualité 3 2 18
Report on Business 3 2 16
Cottage Life 3 1 9
Eighteen Bridges 3 1 7
Legion Magazine 2 0 1
Western Living 1 3 4
Sportsnet 1 2 7
The Grid 1 1 12
Hazlitt 1 1 8
Flare 1 1 2
United Church Observer 1 1 2
enRoute 1 1 1
Malahat Review 1 1 1
Torontoist 1 1 1
Toronto Life 0 2 16
Jobboom 0 2 0

See the complete list of winners at magazine-awards.com.

INTEGRATED AWARDS – GOLD WINNERS  

Best Single Issue
Tenth Anniversary Issue
The Walrus


Magazine Covers
Larry Fink
Report on Business

Infographics
How Much Does a Street Cost?
The Grid

Editorial Package (Web)
Canada’s Best New Restaurants
enRoute
13628

Online Video
Boy Genius
Maclean’s

Single Service Article Package
Calendrier de l’avent
Ricardo

Words & Pictures
Sponsored by CDS Global
Water
The Walrus

WRITING AWARDS – GOLD WINNERS

Arts & Entertainment
Curtis Gillespie
Rebel Without Applause
Eighteen Bridges

Best Short Feature
Paul Wells
Boy Genius
Maclean’s 

Blogs
Jamie Bradburn, Kevin Plummer, David Wencer
Historicist
Torontoist

Business
Sponsored by Accenture
Charles Wilkins
This Little Piggy Went to Market…and the Farmer Lost Money
Report on Business

Columns
Sponsored by Impresa Communications Ltd.
Chantal Hébert
Politique
L’actualité

Editorial Package (Print)
Sponsored by Canadian Society of Magazine Editors
Marine Corniou, Dominique Forget, Joel Leblanc, Raymond Lemieux, Chantal Srivastava
Août 2013
Québec Science

Essays
Curtis Gillespie
In The Chair
Eighteen Bridges

Fiction
Jess Taylor
Paul
Little Brother Magazine

Health & Medicine
Ann Silversides
First Do No Harm
Maisonneuve

How-To
Jane Rodmell, David Zimmer
Best Flavour Ever
Cottage Life

Humour
Scott Feschuk
Assemble ingredients. Pause dramatically.
Maclean’s

Investigative Reporting
Adam Day
One Martyr Down
Legion Magazine

One of a Kind
Craig Davidson
The Marineland Dreamland
The Walrus

Personal Journalism
Liz Windhorst Harmer
Blip
Malahat Review

Poetry
Karen Solie
Conversion
Hazlitt

Politics & Public Interest
Lisa Fitterman
The Avenger
The Walrus

Profiles
Omar Mouallem
The Kingdom of Haymour
Eighteen Bridges

Science, Technology & Environment
Sponsored by GE Canada
Alanna Mitchell
Losing the Hooded Grebe
United Church Observer 

Service: Health & Family
Sharon Adams
Lest We Forget: The Shocking Crisis Facing Our Wounded Veterans
Legion Magazine

Service: Lifestyle
Valérie Borde
Vive le poisson éco!
L’actualité

Service: Personal Finance & Business
Sponsored by Manulife Financial
Denny Manchee
The Hand-Me-Down Blues
Cottage Life

Society
Dan Werb
The Fix
The Walrus

Sports & Recreation
Jonathan Trudel
La machine à broyer les rêves
L’actualité

Travel
Taras Grescoe
Big Mac
The Walrus

 

VISUAL AWARDS – GOLD WINNERS

Art Direction of an Entire Issue
Sponsored by The Lowe-Martin Group
Paul Sych
Issue 1
fshnunlimited (f.u.)

Art Direction of a Single Article
Underline Studio
Not in the Age of the Pharaohs
Prefix Photo

Beauty
John Van Der Schilden, Photographer
Brittany Eccles, Art Director
Juliana Schiavinatto, Stylist
Vanessa Craft, Beauty Director
Masterpiece Theatre
ELLE Canada

Creative Photography
Paul Weeks
Wall Candy
Azure

Fashion
Petra Collins, Photographer
Jed Tallo, Art Director
Corey Ng, Stylist
Pastels Take Shape
Flare

Homes & Gardens
Martin Tessler, Photographer
Paul Roelofs, Art Director
Nicole Sjöstedt, Stylist
Bright Idea
Western Living

Illustration
Selena Wong
Old Wounds
Maisonneuve

Magazine Website Design
TheWalrus.ca
The Walrus

Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Sponsored by CNW Group
Brett Gundlock
El Pueblo
Maisonneuve

Portrait Photography
Anya Chibis
Larry Fink
Report on Business

Spot Illustration
Gracia Lam
The Elite Yellow Peril
Maisonneuve

Still-Life Photography
Liam Mogan
Set Pieces
Sharp

ABOUT THE 37th ANNUAL NATIONAL MAGAZINE AWARDS

More than 500 members of the Canadian magazine industry—publishers, editors, art directors, writers, photographers, illustrators, circulators and more—joined esteemed sponsors and other guests at the 37th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 6, 2014, at The Carlu in Toronto, presented by CDS Global.

This year, from nearly 2000 individual entries received nationwide, the NMAF’s 238 volunteer judges nominated a total of 376 submissions from 92 different Canadian magazines for awards in 47 written, visual, integrated and special categories.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The National Magazine Awards Foundation acknowledges the financial support of the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario, as well as the Ontario Media Development Corporation.

The NMAF thanks its corporate sponsors Accenture, GE Canada, Manulife Financial, RBC Royal Bank, The Lowe-Martin Group, Canadian Society of Magazine Editors, Penguin Random House and Reader’s Digest Foundation for their generous financial support of the National Magazine Awards.

The NMAF thanks its media partners Cottage Life Media, Impresa Communications Ltd., Masthead, Rogers Media, TC Media and Toronto Life for their generous support of the National Magazine Awards.

The NMAF thanks its event partners CNW Group and Media Vantage, The CarluDaniel et Daniel, Relay Experience, KlixPix and Michèle Champagne for their generous support of the National Magazine Awards.

The NMAF gratefully acknowledges all its suppliers and its contributors who donated gifts in kind to support the awards program. We thank them for their generosity, interest and expertise. Thanks also to our hard-working event volunteers.

And thanks again to our wonderful Master of Ceremonies, Scott Feschuk.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL MAGAZINE AWARDS FOUNDATION

The National Magazine Awards Foundation is a bilingual, not-for-profit institution whose mission is to recognize and promote excellence in the content and creation of Canadian print and digital publications through an annual program of awards and national publicity efforts.

For more information, visit magazine-awards.com and follow us on Twitter (@MagAwards).

 

 

Best Words & Pictures in Canadian Magazines

It’s almost time! The 37th annual National Magazine Awards gala is this Friday June 6. [TICKETS]

This year in the category Words & Pictures there are 8 finalists vying for the Gold and Silver awards. This category is sponsored by CDS Global, the presenting sponsor of the 37th annual National Magazine Awards.

Which do you think is best? Leave a comment or tell us on Twitter: @MagAwards | #NMA14 

 

Jim Moodie, Daniel Ehrenworth, Kim Zagar, Martin Zibauer
The Seven Year Pitch
Cottage Life

 

Barbara Amiel, Natalie Castellino, Erika Oliveira, Andrew Tolson, Stephen Gregory, Kim Honey
Barbara Amiel, 1979: Maclean’s Portrait SIP
Maclean’s

 

Kim Honey, Colin Campbell, Andrew Tolson, Natalie Castellino, Stephen Gregory
Cool Jobs feature in Maclean’s 2014 Guide to Jobs in Canada
Maclean’s

 

Rashi Khilnani, Sami Siva, Nayan Sthankiya, Domenic Macri, Dawn Calleja
The 18,700-kilometre journey ends here
Report on Business

 

Dan Robson, Roger LeMoyne, Myles McCutcheon, Jamie Hodgson, Dave Chau, Dafna Izenberg
This is Our House
Sportsnet

 

Edward Burtynsky, Brian Morgan, John Macfarlane, Kyle Carsten Wyatt, Sasha Chapman, Paul Kim, David Macfarlane
Water
The Walrus

 

Sadiya Dendar, Tony Lanz, Alicia Kowalewski, Erin Finlayson, Alex Mathers, Steph Hung
25 Easy Costumes Under $25
Today’s Parent

Congrats to all the nominees.

Check out all the National Magazine Awards finalists on our Facebook page. Which do you think is best? Leave a comment or tell us on Twitter: @MagAwards | #NMA14

See also:
Top 10 Canadian Magazine Editorial Packages
Top 10 Business Articles in Canadian Magazines
Top 10 Personal Finance Articles in Canadian Magazines
Top 10 Columnists in Canadian Magazines
Top 10 Science Stories in Canadian Magazines
Top 7 Photojournalists in Canadian Magazines
Top 7 Fashion Spreads in Canadian Magazines
Top 10 Canadian Magazine Illustrations
Top 9 Infographics in Canadian Magazines
Top 6 Canadian Magazines for Art Direction
How Did They Create That Cover?

Top Magazine Videos in Canada

How Did They Create That Cover? subTerrain

The finalists for the 37th annual National Magazine Awards have been announced — including ten nominations in the Magazine Covers category.

In a new blog series titled How Did They Create That Cover? the NMAF chats with the creative directors of the Magazine Covers finalists about how their covers were made. It’s a behind-the-scenes look at things we may or may not think about when we pick up a magazine and devour its pages.

Today we chat with illustrator Marlena Zuber, creator of this nominated cover from subTerrain:

 

NMAF: Can you tell us a bit about your style of illustration, and how you came to be an illustrator?

Marlena: I was privileged to attend Etobicoke School of the Arts for my High School years. My major was Visual Arts and my minor was dance. Then I was off to OCAD. I had to decide if I wanted take the Fine Art or the Commercial route. I had been working at a children’s book and toy store and fell in love with the storybook section. Often when I got my pay cheque I would buy a favourite book based on the illustrations. I still have those books and have a little one that I can share them with now. That’s been pretty nice.

Those illustrators inspired me and I thought, I want to do something like that. I will also admit that I was typically afraid of being that mythical or perhaps not-so mythical “starving artist” if I went into the drawing and painting programs (the common sheepish story of the illustrator). Illustration was a viable choice. And so I studied illustration and I actually liked it. I liked the challenge of editorial work, coming up with a concept and working with text. I graduated, had offers from agents and dove straight into the world of mainly editorial illustration.

My style is something that’s evolved over the years and continues to evolve. One thing that seems to be a constant is my use of ink or fine pens. My work is also more drawing than painting. I’ve always loved playing with texture and pattern. My sketchbook of hidden art sometimes also inspires my illustration style. I like when things look immediate, slightly messy, and slightly unfinished. If a concept allows, I will draw people in group formations. I am interested in what we do in groups: dancing, sports, entertaining, recreation, etc. Oh yeah, and I have been influenced by artists and illustrators like Edward Gorey, Henrik Drescher, Frida Kahlo, Leanne Shapton and David Shrigley.

NMAF: There are a lot of small scenes happening on the cover. What are some of these groups of people meant to depict?

Marlena: Every group is sitting round a fire, like a campfire. One group is roasting marshmallows, another group is dancing, another one is in group therapy, another are telling Mexican ghost stories, and another group is making out or about to make out. All of them seem to be in the desert, which seemed like a perfect weird hot place. The theme for this issue was Heat. I was influenced by two main things: my love for campfires and photos of Burning Man Festival that I found on the Internet. The groups are like the stories inside the issue. The theme of heat is explored in a range of sexy, philosophical, scientific and magical ways.

NMAF: How were the colours chosen and why?

Marlena: I went heavy on all shades of red due to the theme of Heat. I used blue as a compliment. I also generally like using this palette.

NMAF: What were some of your challenges and concerns during the making of this cover?

Marlena: Brian Kaufman, the editor-in-chief, asked me to incorporate titles of some of the stories in the issue with the campfire groups. It was a fantastic idea and he suggested that I try incorporating the text in the smoke of the fires rising above each group. It simply didn’t look good. It took me awhile to problem solve. In the end I placed them almost like little playful 3D characters near or around the fires. That seemed to work.

NMAF: What did you use to create this cover? Can you explain the process?

Marlena: I work in a traditional way: pen and ink on sometimes fancy, sometimes not-too-fancy paper. That’s exactly what happened on the cover. I did use Photoshop to clean it up and piece a few things together.

This interview was edited for content. Special thanks to Nadya Domingo for conducting the interview.

 

More ‘How Did They Create That Cover?’Fashion MagazineToronto LifeBC BusinessWestern Living, Report on Business

Check out the finalists for best Magazine Cover on our Facebook page. Share your feedback with us on Twitter: @MagAwards | #NMA14 | #MagazineCovers.

The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed on June 6 at the National Magazine Awards gala. [TICKETS]

Top Magazine Videos in Canada (Part 2)

For the second year the National Magazine Awards Foundation is recognizing excellence in the production of Online Video by Canadian magazines. This year’s 8 finalists were announced on May 1 along with the complete list of this year’s nominations. The winners will be revealed at the 37th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 6. [Tickets]

Last week we profiled the first 4 nominees; here’s a look at second batch of finalists for Online Video.

Which do you think is best? Leave a comment or tell us on Twitter: @MagAwards | #NMA14 | #OnlineVideo

 

“Les gentlemâles”

Video-Chatelaine

MagazineChâtelaine
Title: Les gentlemâles
Credits: FarWeb.TV, Direction; Robert Boulos, Producer; Charles Grenier, Video Editor

Intimacy, family values and gender roles are discussed at liberty by three prominent Québécois actors, Vincent Graton, Christian Bégin and Réal Bossé.  Over the course of two hours, four cameras capture an intuitive, unfiltered conversation led by the subjects.

 

“Revising the Revolution”

MagazineReport on Business
Title: Revising the Revolution
Credits: Sven Creutzmann, Director & Videographer; Stephen Wicary, Hannah Sung, Producers; Clare Vander Meersch, Co-Producer; Julian Liurette, Douglas Peretz, Video Editors

The “cuentapropistas,” or Cuban entrepreneurs, have begun opening small businesses in certain local industries. Las Tres Mesallas is a restaurant that has sprung up in Havana. Owner Mireya Luis’ three gold medals in Olympic volleyball provide her the celebrity, while her husband chips in the recipes to keep her brand and restaurant thriving.

 

“Julie Cusson”

MagazineGlow
Title: Glow Artist Spotlight: Chanel Makeup Artist Julie Cusson
Credits: Alex Cirka, Director & Videographer; Samra Habib, Director & Producer; Ryan Bauer, Video Editor

Freelance and self-taught makeup artist Julie Cusson speaks about fashion photos and painting techniques that have inspired her work. Subtle lounge music plays in the background, bringing a relaxing atmosphere to her discussion on high fashion makeup products and her experience working with Chanel.

 

“Cold Comfort”

MagazineUnited Church Observer
Title: Cold Comfort
Credits: Kevin Spurgaitis, Director & Producer; Jill Kitchener, Video Editor; Chelsea Temple Jones, Contributor

This short documentary displays a night in the life of a church shelter through a touching profile of Waterloo, Ontario’s First United Church and its Out of the Cold program. It is a video testament on how the working poor and homeless are coping in today’s economic conditions.

Special thanks to Melissa Myers for the episode capsules.

See also:
Top 7 Fashion Spreads in Canadian Magazines
Top 10 Canadian Magazine Illustrations
Top 9 Infographics in Canadian Magazines
Top 6 Canadian Magazines for Art Direction
How Did They Create That Cover?

Top Magazine Videos in Canada (Part 1)

The Complete Collection (full-text articles) of all National Magazine Awards nominees.

How Did They Create That Cover? Report on Business

The finalists for the 37th annual National Magazine Awards have been announced — including ten nominations in the Magazine Covers category.

In a new blog series titled How Did They Create That Cover? the NMAF chats with the creative directors of the Magazine Covers finalists about how their covers were made. It’s a behind-the-scenes look at things we may or may not think about when we pick up a magazine and devour its pages.

Today we chat with Domenic Macri, art director at Report on Business and creator of two of the ten finalists for best Magazine Cover:

NMAF: Where was this photo taken and why was this location chosen?

Domenic: After taking some portraits in the BlackRock offices in Toronto, we convinced Larry Fink to continue the shoot just outside on Bay Street. He was apprehensive, and it was starting to rain. Once outside, the photographer, Anya Chibis*, had Fink walk across the street. And it was at this point that Chibis managed to capture Fink with his guard down.

NMAF: There’s a lot going on in the Larry Fink cover–his facial and body expressions are very animated. Was this staged or a candid photograph, and why did you decide on this image?

Domenic: Typically, we don’t get as much body language from high-profile business people—especially one who runs the largest investment fund in the world—so we couldn’t resist trying it on the cover. And since the story celebrated his achievements, we decided to run with it.

* Editor’s Note: Photographer Anya Chibis is also nominated in the category Portrait Photography for her work on this cover.

NMAF: Is the animal on the “Target” cover fake or real? How was this achieved?

Domenic: The image on the cover is in fact Bullseye, the official mascot of Target. We managed to book a photo shoot with him when he was in Toronto. He was very well behaved.

NMAF: Was this always the image that you had in mind for the Target cover? What were some of the other ideas?

Domenic: When we commissioned the photographer, Aaron Vincent Elkaim, to get the shot, I already knew what I wanted—a close up of Bullseye’s distinct eye markings, which I could use on the cover. At the time, the Target marketing machine was working overtime, and stories and ads were appearing everywhere; most of the time, they were using the graphic red Target logo and portraits of Bullseye. I felt that by using the imperfect logo on Bullseye’s eye, along with the texture of his fur, we would be making an obvious connection to our cover story without looking like a promotional piece for Target.

NMAF: There isn’t a lot of text on this cover, other than the magazine name and headline on the bottom corner. What was the reason behind that decision? 

Domenic: Sometimes, when you don’t have the greatest image to work with on the cover, you can sell the story with strong lines. In this case, however, I had a strong graphic image, and I didn’t want to clutter up the image with blaring cover lines.

This interview was edited for content. Special thanks to Nadya Domingo for conducting the interview.

More ‘How Did They Create That Cover?’Fashion MagazineToronto LifeBC BusinessWestern Living

Check out the finalists for best Magazine Cover on our Facebook page. Share your feedback with us on Twitter: @MagAwards | #NMA14 | #MagazineCovers.

The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed on June 6 at the National Magazine Awards gala. [TICKETS]

How Did They Create That Cover? Western Living

The finalists for the 37th annual National Magazine Awards have been announced — including ten nominations in the Magazine Covers category.

In a new blog series titled How Did They Create That Cover? the NMAF chats with the creative directors of the Magazine Covers finalists about how their covers were made. It’s a behind-the-scenes look at things we may or may not think about when we pick up a magazine and devour its pages.

Today we chat with Paul Roelofs, art director at Western Living and creator of this nominated cover:

NMAF: Was this cover always what the magazine had in mind to depict the story, or were there other ideas? 

Paul: Not at all what we had in mind. The September issue is a landmark issue for us each year and features a large editorial package called Designers of the Year. It is a competition that WL hosts in many design categories. The issue celebrates the winners and there are quite large awards events that accompany the issue in Vancouver and Calgary. And so for the one issue each year we have the opportunity to break the mould, so to speak, and create something more conceptual.

The challenge is to find iconography that somehow covers the diversity of the categories, from architecture and interior design to fashion and industrial design, etc. Other thoughts ranged from creating a room set with pantone chips as artwork on the walls. Also: a still-life photograph of all different tools used across the genres.

NMAF: Why was the colour palette chosen to depict the Designers of the Year?

Paul: The visual icon was a swatch pad, like a pantone swatch fan. We landed on this since it seemed general enough to work across multiple design genres. As for the colours, we were inspired by Paul Smith colour palettes and embarked on creating our own palette that seemed fresh, bold and timeless, and not seasonal.

NMAF: How many people were involved in the making of this particular cover, and what role did you play?

Paul: Our entire senior group has a voice in this cover. We take a very collaborative approach. I drive the creative and so lead the group in partnership with the editor in chief. Once we landed on the idea, I sketched it out and contracted a 3D rendering artist, Mike Cormack, to help bring the idea to life. I had worked with Mike in the past for rendering retail products that were still in production and needed to be brought to life before they existed yet. We explored having a swatch fan built by a printing house and then photographed and retouched, but with the 3D rendering technology being so sophisticated today, it became the obvious choice for execution.

NMAF: Correct me if I’m wrong, but I think I spot Helvetica! Any reason behind the iconic font choice?  

Paul: That, my friend, is Univers and one of the fonts that debuted in the redesign that launched that same month.

 

This interview was edited for content. Special thanks to Nadya Domingo for conducting the interview.

More ‘How Did They Create That Cover?’Fashion MagazineToronto Life, BC Business

Check out the finalists for best Magazine Cover on our Facebook page. Share your feedback with us on Twitter: @MagAwards | #NMA14 | #MagazineCovers.

The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed on June 6 at the National Magazine Awards gala. [TICKETS]

How Did They Create That Cover? BC Business

The finalists for the 37th annual National Magazine Awards have been announced — including ten nominations in the Magazine Covers category.

In a new blog series titled How Did They Create That Cover? the NMAF chats with the creative directors of the Magazine Covers finalists about how their covers were made. It’s a behind-the-scenes look at things we may or may not think about when we pick up a magazine and devour its pages.

Today we chat with Catherine Mullaly, art director at BC Business and co-creator of this nominated cover:

NMAF: Can you describe what the setting was like at the photo shoot for this cover?

Catherine: I was not at the photo shoot for this cover, but Ben Oliver, our associate art director, was there. This was a joint collaboration and we entered the National Magazine Awards as co-contributors. We did not have time to scout our location so Ben (along with photographer Paul Joseph) went with the plan of shooting for the story and keeping his eye out for a good cover opportunity. The setting is real – it’s the meat cooler in the butcher shop where our subject (owner and butcher Jason Pleym) butchers his locally grown beef.

NMAF: What was the editorial decision behind the font placement, particularly how the words “Getting Killed” are in bold?

Catherine: When we saw the image we knew immediately it would make a stunning cover. The raw meat is jarring and I love the intense eye contact of the butcher. The focus of the image was the butcher and the cutting board – it made sense to place the main cover line right below. We had to darken the image a bit below so the cover lines really popped. Bold image – bold cover line. Our editor at the time, Tom Gierasimczuck, came up with our compelling headline and together it made for a cover hard not to pick up.

NMAF: Can you explain the process of setting up the meat?

Catherine: Rather than set up and planned, it is a true environmental photograph. The story was about small independent food distributors and this fellow, a local beef producer and butcher, was busy at work when they arrived. The table was laid out with these beautiful (if you’re not a vegetarian) fresh cuts of meat and as soon as Ben walked in he saw an opportunity for a shoot that would be a stunning cover. They did a quick light setup while the butcher was at work.

 NMAF: There are many different kinds of local food producers. Why did the magazine choose someone in the meat industry?

Catherine: This local meat producer (and butcher) was the lead of our cover story – it made sense to choose him for the cover. Most often we spend so much time planning and executing our covers and so many times there are a lot of challenges along the way. When we saw the results from this shoot we put any cover plans on hold and ran with this beautiful ‘real’ and for the most part unplanned cover image.

NMAF: The colours on the cover are interesting, particularly how the man’s outfit contrasts the red meat. Was this intentional?

Catherine: I love the simplicity of the colours in this cover, the rest of the photo is pretty neutral. The meat is red, his apron was blue – perfect. Together the two primary colours look great together. Whenever I have an opportunity to have primary colours on the cover I do. I actually added a little pop of yellow in the ‘button’ so we have all three primary colours.

 

This interview was edited for content. Special thanks to Nadya Domingo for conducting the interview.

More ‘How Did They Create That Cover?’: Fashion Magazine, Toronto Life

Check out the finalists for best Magazine Cover on our Facebook page. Share your feedback with us on Twitter: @MagAwards | #NMA14 | #MagazineCovers.

The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed on June 6 at the National Magazine Awards gala. [TICKETS]

See also:
Top 9 Infographics in Canadian Magazines
Top 6 Canadian Magazines for Art Direction
Top 10 Canadian Magazine Illustrations
Top Magazine Videos in Canada

 

How Did They Create That Cover? Toronto Life

The finalists for the 37th annual National Magazine Awards have been announced — including ten nominations in the Magazine Covers category.

In a new blog series titled How Did They Create That Cover? the NMAF chats with the creative directors of the Magazine Covers finalists about how their covers were made. It’s a behind-the-scenes look at things we may or may not think about when we pick up a magazine and devour its pages.

Today we chat with Christine Dewairy, art director at Toronto Life and creator of this nominated cover:

NMAF: Can you explain the process of choosing the child on the cover?

Christine Dewairy: Well, it had to be a mixed-race child, obviously.* But we also wanted to go in extremely close, and this little girl had such gorgeous skin, captivating eyes and lush curly hair. She was perfect. Also being about three years old, she was still in that very pure, sweet, innocent age.

*Editor’s Note: The cover story of this issue of Toronto Life, “Mixie Me” by Nicholas Hune-Brown, is also nominated for 2 NMAs this year.

NMAF: Did you always know that the image would only show a portion of the child’s face? 

Christine: No, but we did know it was a gatefold cover and that we’d need something on the flap. Showing only a portion of her face gave it impact and intimacy that would have been lost had the photo been more pulled back. I wanted the newsstand reader or passerby to be drawn in by the intense eye contact, and then the understated headline directly below.

Also, because the story wasn’t about this child in particular, but about a societal shift, by zooming in on the face, it becomes less about the person and more about the features — the eye, the hair, the skin, etc.

NMAF: Placing text on someone’s face is unique and unconventional for magazine covers. Did you have any hesitations about this? 

Christine: I didn’t want to lose the immediacy and impact of the larger-than-life face, to make room for the headline. The type becomes part of the image. You can’t look at one without absorbing the other simultaneously.

NMAF: Some might look at this cover and be immediately drawn to the child’s eye. In your opinion, what do you think is the focal point of this cover?

Christine: The viewer’s eye might wander at first, from the girl’s eye, to her lashes, her curls, and so on, but I think it’s impossible to just stop at the eye. Her features frame the type in such a way that marries the elements.

NMAF: What were some concerns and challenges when putting together this cover?

Christine: One question was how small you can go with the main sell, and how low you can place it on the page, and still draw people’s attention. We decided to keep it relatively small. I think sometimes a whisper can be louder than a shout, especially when you lay it on an enormously compelling image, like this one, and the words are super clear and unequivocal.

 

This interview was edited for content. Special thanks to Nadya Domingo for conducting the interview.

More ‘How Did They Create That Cover?’Fashion Magazine

Check out the finalists for best Magazine Cover on our Facebook page. Share your feedback with us on Twitter: @MagAwards | #NMA14 | #MagazineCovers.

The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed on June 6 at the National Magazine Awards gala. [TICKETS]

Top Magazine Videos in Canada (Part 1)

For the second year the National Magazine Awards Foundation is recognizing excellence in the production of Online Video by Canadian magazines. This year’s 8 finalists were announced on May 1 along with the complete list of this year’s nominations. The winners will be revealed at the 37th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 6. [Tickets]

Here’s a look at the first 4 finalists for Online Video. Check back next week for our profile of the remaining 4 finalists.

Which do you think is best? Leave a comment or tell us on Twitter: @MagAwards | #NMA14 | #OnlineVideo

 

“Vacant”

Magazine: FILLER
Title: Vacant
CreditsNelson Lee, Director & Video Editor; Jennifer Lee, Producer; Michael Lockridge, Videographer

As a self-proclaimed “fashion magazine for culture junkies,” FILLER’s aptitude for marrying entrancing song with daring fashion is exemplified in a unique way in Celebrity Style & Fashion Films: Oldboy’s Pom Klementieff for FILLER Magazine. This video brings clothing to life by creating a world that compliments its style, offering a new fashion experience above and beyond that of the still photograph.

 

“Glassblower”

HH-Glassblower2MagazineCanadian House & Home
Title: Glassblower: Nick Chase
CreditsSheri Graham-Delagran, Director; Ryan Louis, Producer; Jason Stickley, Videographer; Patrick Malone, Video Editor

This candid portrait of a glassblower and his work explores how Nick Chase pairs organic leaf structures with man-made, glass-blown objects.  He shares the ways in which the inconsistencies in his pieces reflect emotional truths within himself.  This story allows viewers access into the mind and soul of a contemporary artist practicing a trade aged by centuries.

 

“One Room, Six Ways”

MagazineCanadian House & Home
Title: One Room, Six Ways
Credits: Sheri Graham-Delagran, Director; Ryan Louis, Producer; Jason Stickley, Videographer; Erin Gulas, Video Editor

An eye-opening exhibit of how to decorate a room, this video shows how artwork can liven up and personalize any space.  Creating six new moods while utilizing one furniture layout, Anya Shor and Manny Neubacher share a simple solution for anyone yearning to amp up their interior-design style.

 

“Boy Genius”

MagazineMaclean’s
Title: Boy Genius
Credits: Jessica Darmanin, Michelle Turingan, Directors & Producers

Paul Wells’s interview with Kristine and Jacob Barnett creates the basis for this fascinating depiction of how one mother took her autistic son’s therapy into her own hands, releasing him back into their world.  This compelling story challenges medical expectations while uncovering the mathematical genius of an impressive young man.

Editor’s Note: Paul Wells’s story for the print edition of Maclean’s, “Boy Genius,” is also nominated for a National Magazine Award for Best Short Feature.

 

Special thanks to Melissa Myers for the episode capsules.

See also:
Top 9 Infographics in Canadian Magazines
Top 6 Magazines for Art Direction
How Did They Create That Cover?

How Did They Create That Cover? Fashion Magazine

The finalists for the 37th annual National Magazine Awards have been announced — including ten nominations in the Magazine Covers category.

In a new blog series titled How Did They Create That Cover? the NMAF chats with the creative directors of the Magazine Covers finalists about how their covers were made. It’s a behind-the-scenes look at things we may or may not think about when we pick up a magazine and devour its pages.

Today we chat with Eng Lau, art director at FASHION Magazine and creator of this nominated cover:

NMAF: Was it difficult to pick the final image of Miley?

Eng Lau: There are a few factors to consider when picking a cover image. Firstly, the energy of eye contact; will her look grab the attention if you are just browsing through the newsstand? Secondly, is there room for cover lines? We have to ensure that all cover lines are legible, in order to convey the content in the issue that would appeal to a wide range of readers. The image satisfied both counts, so no, it was not a difficult choice.

NMAF: How was the blue and red shadow effect achieved?

Eng: The red and blue shadow helps to create a 3-D effect, and [helps] make it pop against the plain white background. The shadow in the image is a result of a particular lighting effect used by the photographer. Colours are what make the image pop in an elegant way. You need just enough of a contrast, but it must still be stylish.

NMAF: There are certain words on the cover that are set in boldface red. Can you explain why these words were chosen specifically?

Eng: We highlighted certain words to create balance of the colours on the layout and to make it more dynamic.

NMAF: Miley is quoted on the cover (“Shocking is what I’m good at”). How was this quote chosen?

Eng: The editorial team looks over the article and selects a few outstanding quotes. We meet to look over the selections and see what works the best and fits into the space comfortably.

NMAF: With a cover like this, people’s attention might be immediately drawn to the celebrity. How do you draw their attention to the content as well as the image?

Eng: The strong image is what initially draws an individual to the magazine, and once they stop to look at it, we have to ensure that the cover lines are visually appealing as well as succinct and enticing to readers. Both image and text have to work in harmony to create a powerful and appealing cover, and we are very pleased to have received a National Magazine Awards nomination!

[This interview was edited for content. Special thanks to Nadya Domingo for conducting the interview.]

Check out the finalists for best Magazine Cover on our Facebook page. Share your feedback with us on Twitter: @MagAwards | #NMA14 | #MagazineCovers.

The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed on June 6 at the National Magazine Awards gala. [TICKETS].

 

Top 9 Infographics in Canadian Magazines

The finalists for the 37th annual National Magazine Awards were announced recently. This year a new category was added to the awards program: Infographics.

After much deliberation, the jury has nominated 9 entries for the shortlist. The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed on June 6 at the National Magazine Awards gala. [TICKETS]

Click each image to enlarge to the full infographic. Which do you think is best? Leave a comment or tell us on Twitter: @MagAwards | #NMA14.

The Flood: 6 Months Later   

Christina Borowiecki, Illustrator
Rianne Stewart, Editor
Cath Osburn, Art Director
Chaz Osburn, Dani Perry, Contributors
The Flood: 6 Months Later
Alberta Construction Magazine

Hadfield Twitterverse

IG-macleans

Amanda Shendruk, Illustrator
Sue Allan, Editor
Amanda Shendruk, Art Director
Hadfield Twitterverse
Maclean’s

 

The Breakdown: Transfer Madness   

Dave Chau, Illustrator
Jordan Heath-Rawlings, Editor
Jamie Hodgson, Art Director
Jamie Doyle, Contributor
The Breakdown: Transfer Madness
Sportsnet

 

How much does a street cost? 

LeeAndra Cianci, Designer
Danielle Groen, Editor
Vanessa Wyse, Creative Director
Hudson Hayden, Photographer
Contributors: David Topping, Chris Bilton
How much does a street cost?
The Grid

 

Inside Toronto’s indie evolution    

Adam Cholewa, Designer
Lianne George, Editor
Vanessa Wyse, Creative Director
Chris Bilton, Contributor
Inside Toronto’s indie evolution
The Grid

 

Counted out     

Nicola Hamilton, Designer
Lianne George, Editor
Vanessa Wyse, Creative Director
David Topping, Contributor
Counted out
The Grid

 

Road to Nowhere

Adam Cholewa, Designer
Chris Bolton, Editor
Vanessa Wyse, Creative Director
Contributors: David Topping, Stuart Berman
Road to Nowhere / Tending to our Gardiner
The Grid

 

What’s your favourite junky cereal?

Liam Mogan, Photographer
Lianne George, Editor
Vanessa Wyse, Creative Director
Shelbie Vermette-Grant, Photo Editor
What’s your favourite junky cereal?
The Grid

 

The Toronto Sex Poll

Jack Dylan, Illustrator
Sarah Fulford, Angie Gardos, Editors
Christine Dewairy, Art Director
Contributors: Bradley Reinhardt, Clarence Poirier
The Toronto Sex Poll
Toronto Life

 

The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed on June 6 at the National Magazine Awards gala. [TICKETS]

Which do you think is best? Leave a comment or tell us on Twitter: @MagAwards | #NMA14.

Announcing the Nominees for the 37th annual National Magazine Awards

The National Magazine Awards Foundation is pleased to announce the nominees for the 37th annual National Magazine Awards.

Complete List of Nominees [PDF]*
Press Release: English | Français
Gala Info & Tickets
* Credit Changes due by May 7

Winners will be revealed at the annual National Magazine Awards gala on Friday, June 6, at The Carlu in Toronto.

For Magazine of the Year, the three finalists are:

From the best Canadian magazines across the country, this year’s jury selected 3 finalists for the prestigious award for Magazine of the Year: Azure, Cottage Life and Nouveau Projet.

For Magazine Website of the Year, the three finalists are:
Hazlitt, Maclean’s, Torontoist.

For Tablet Magazine of the Year, the three finalists are:
Canadian Business, Sportsnet, The Hockey News.

For Best New Magazine Writer, the three finalists are:
Suzannah Showler (Maisonneuve), Liz Windhorst Harmer (The New Quarterly), Catherine McIntyre (This Magazine).

For Best Magazine Cover, the ten finalists are:
BCBusiness, Chatelaine, Fashion Magazine, L’actualité, Maclean’s, Report on Business (2), Toronto Life, subTerrain, Western Living.

For Best Single Issue, the eight finalists are:
Azure, Cottage Life, depict Magazine, Rotman Management, Spacing, The Grid, Toronto Life, The Walrus.

For Art Direction of an Entire Issue, the six finalists are:
Canadian Business, Flare, fshnunlimited (f.u.), Nouveau Projet, Prefix Photo, The Walrus.

In a new category for Infographics, the nine finalists are:
Alberta Construction, Maclean’s, Sportsnet, The Grid (5), Toronto Life.

View all finalists | PDF

 

Top nominated magazines for the 37th National Magazine Awards:

Magazine Written Integrated Visual Special Total
The Walrus 24 3 8 0 35
L’actualité 20 2 1 0 23
Report on Business 10 4 7 0 21
Maclean’s 11 6 0 1 18
Toronto Life 9 6 3 0 18
Maisonneuve 8 0 5 1 14
The Grid 3 8 3 0 14
Cottage Life 7 2 3 1 13
Eighteen Bridges 11 0 0 0 11
Sportsnet 7 2 0 1 10
Hazlitt 8 1 0 1 10

Five magazines are nominated for National Magazine Award for the first time: Alberta Construction Magazine, depict Magazine, fshnunlimited (f.u.), Little Brother Magazine, and Quatre-Temps. 

 

WRITING AWARDS
There are 24 categories for magazine writing. Curtis Gillespie leads all individual finalists with five nominations in written categories for his work in Eighteen Bridges and Western Living. Nicholas Hune-Brown is nominated four times for written work in Toronto Life, Reader’s Digest and The Grid, followed by Jonathan Trudel, Catherine Dubé, Eric Reguly, Ray Ford and Charles Wilkins, who garnered three nominations each. View all finalists | PDF

VISUAL AWARDS
There are 12 categories for visual content (photograph, illustration, art direction, web design). The Grid’s art director, Vanessa Wyse, is nominated five times in the new Infographics category and three times for Best Art Direction of a Single Magazine Article. In addition, photographer Chris Nicholls is nominated five times for his work for FASHION Magazine and Dress to Kill, while art director Domenic Macri secured four nominations on behalf of Report of BusinessView all finalists | PDF

INTEGRATED AWARDS
There are 7 categories for integrated magazine content, including Words & Pictures, Single Service Article Package, Online Video, Editorial Package-Web, Infographics, Magazine Covers, and Best Single Issue. View all finalists | PDF

FOUNDATION AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT
As announced on April 30, the winner of the 2014 NMAF Award for Outstanding Achievement is Kim Jernigan, longtime editor of The New Quarterly and veteran champion of literary magazines in Canada. Read more.

37th NMA GALA
nma2013-4
Gold and Silver awards will be handed down on June 6 in 24 written categories, 12 visual categories and 7 integrated categories. All other finalists will receive Honourable Mentions. Winners will also be celebrated in 5 special categories: Outstanding Achievement, Best New Magazine Writer, Magazine Website of the Year, Tablet Magazine of the Year, and Magazine of the Year.

Gold award winners in written, visual and integrated categories (except Best Single Issue) receive a cash prize of $1000; Silver winners $500. The winner of Best New Magazine Writer receives a cash prize of $500.

Tickets

CREDIT CHANGES
Email us at staff[at]magazine-awards.com to request any credit changes to your nomination. The deadline for credit changes is May 7.

THANK YOU!
A grand thank you to all of our judges who evaluated this year’s entries to the National Magazine Awards. From nearly 2000 individual entries nationwide, the NMAF’s 238 volunteer judges nominated a total of 376 submissions from 92 different Canadian magazines for awards in 48 written, visual, integrated and special categories.

FOLLOW THE NOMINEES
Subscribe to the Magazine Awards blog for frequent updates and profiles of nominees during the month leading up to the NMA gala on June 6. Follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/MagAwards) and Twitter (@MagAwards) for photos, news and more.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The National Magazine Awards Foundation acknowledges the financial support of the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario, and the Ontario Media Development Corporation. The National Magazine Awards Foundation gratefully acknowledges its suppliers and its contributors who donated gifts in kind to support the awards program. We thank them for their generosity, interest and expertise.The 37th annual National Magazine Awards gala is presented by CDS Global. The NMAF thanks its corporate sponsors Accenture, GE Canada, Manulife Financial and RBC for their generous financial support of the event.

Tickets are on sale now at magazine-awards.com.

Off the Page, with Canada’s History editor Mark Reid

Off the Page appears regularly on the Magazine Awards blog. Today we catch up with Mark Reid, editor of Canada’s History, winner of the 2012 National Magazine Award for Words & Pictures.

NMAF: Canada’s History (formerly known as The Beaver) is one of this country’s oldest publications, six years away from its centennial. What do you consider the mandate of the magazine to be, and has this changed much in the past 94 years?

Mark Reid (Photo: Marianne Helm)

Mark Reid (Photo: Marianne Helm)

Mark: The mandate is to turn as many Canadians as possible on to their history, and to convince them that our stories are as interesting, entertaining and engaging as any other nation’s. This mandate has changed immensely over the years. In 1920, the magazine began as an in-house newsletter for the Hudson’s Bay Company. As years passed and the fur trade died, the magazine became more of a nostalgia magazine for the “days of yore” on the trap lines, telling stories of the Far North. By the in the 1980s, it had changed focus again, becoming increasingly a “history magazine.” And in 2010, we changed the name to reflect our current focus, going from “The Beaver” to “Canada’s History.”

NMAF: At last year’s National Magazine Awards Canada’s History won Gold in the category Words & Pictures, for “On Thin Ice,” an illustrated memoir of the 1972 Summit Series by Terry Mosher (a.k.a. Aislin), who covered the iconic event as a young political cartoonist. As an editor, what attracted you to this story? And what was the significance for you to have it win a National Magazine Award?

Mark: The ’72 Summit Series is a touchstone moment in our collective cultural history. This Cold War moment is one of a handful of “where were you when” turning points for a generation of Canadians. When I learned that Terry Mosher had travelled to Russia to cover the event as a cartoonist, I knew that we needed to share his story with our wider audience of history lovers.

I asked Terry to colourize the original cartoons he produced in 1972, and share the behind the scenes tales that inspired them. After viewing them, I realized that one cartoon was missing from the story – an image of Paul Henderson scoring the winning goal. Terry’s final cartoon, with Paul Henderson memorialized on a Canadian version of Mount Rushmore, was perfect.

On_Thin_Ice_39

The Canada’s History team was collectively thrilled to work with Terry’s fantastic art, and to share his story with Canadians. For the package to win a National Magazine Award was just icing on the cake — an exciting endorsement from our peers that we received with gratitude, and that we dedicate to everyone with a passion for the past.

NMAF: You recently launched a micro-site called Destinations. How did this project come about, and what do you hope to achieve? 

Mark: While Canada’s History is our flagship magazine, our History Society is engaged in myriad programs. Canada’s History Society is a small Winnipeg-based non-profit that also produces a kid’s history magazine, and runs a host of awards and educational programs for students, teachers and community groups.

Our Destinations site is the latest attempt to reach a new audience of history lovers, in this case, history lovers who combine this passion with travel. Our hope is to work with museums, archives, and tourist sites to help them share their stories with a wider audience. It’s all part of our multipronged approach to encouraging and strengthening interest in our collective past.

NMAF: 2014 figures to be a big year for Canada’s History, with the hundredth anniversary of the start of World War I on the minds of many Canadians. What do you think is the significance of this milestone for Canada, and can you tell us a bit about how the magazine will be covering the anniversary?

Mark: The start of WWI is certainly a huge part of our publishing plans. Our key publication will be a coffee-table book on the subject, titled Canada’s Great War Album. It will be published by HarperCollins Canada, and features essays on all aspects of the war by the country’s top historians and writers, along with photos and artifacts relating to the war that have been sent to us by our readers.

Our goal is to commemorate the courageous men, women and children who lived, loved, fought, served and sacrificed during that difficult time. It will be available for sale in the fall of 2014. On the magazine side, we are also working on a special package of articles that will examine not only WWI, but also WWII, which will mark the 75th anniversary of its start in September 2014. It’s an exciting time to be publishing history, and we look forward to bringing Canadians many more great articles and publications in the months and years to come.

Mark Reid is the editor-in-chief of Canada’s History magazine, published by the History Society in Winnipeg, which also publishes Kayak: Canada’s History Magazine for Kids. Follow them on Twitter @CanadasHistory and @MarkReidEditor.

More Off the Page interviews with NMA winners
Canada’s History in the National Magazine Awards archive
Submissions for the 37th National Magazine Awards

Images courtesy CanadasHistory.ca and National Magazine Awards Foundation.

Guide to entering Digital Content in the National Magazine Awards

For the 2013 National Magazine Awards, original content published in a magazine tablet edition or on a magazine website (companion site of a print title or an online-only magazine) is eligible in most written, visual and integrated categories. Check out the digital magazine section of our FAQ for more information.

There are also 5 categories, generously supported by the Government of Canada, which are open specifically to digital content in Canadian magazines:

TABLET MAGAZINE OF THE YEAR
Open to: Any single issue of a Canadian tablet magazine published in 2013.
Criteria: The award for Tablet Magazine of the Year will go to a single issue of a Tablet Magazine that successfully fulfills its editorial mission by representing the highest journalistic standards and effectively serving its intended audience by maximizing the possibilities afforded by the medium of tablet publishing.
Entry Fee: $150 (early-bird by Jan 10); $175 (regular by Jan 15)
Meet last year’s finalists
Last year’s winner
: Canadian House & Home
More info

MAGAZINE WEBSITE OF THE YEAR
Open to: Any Canadian online-only magazine or companion website of a print title.
Criteria: The award for Magazine Website of the Year will go to a magazine website (either a companion site or an online-only magazine) that successfully fulfills its editorial mission by representing the highest journalistic standards and effectively serving its intended audience by maximizing the possibilities afforded by the medium of web-based publishing.
Entry Fee: $150 (early-bird by Jan 10); $175 (regular by Jan 15)
Meet last year’s finalists
Last year’s winner: Hazlitt
More info

EDITORIAL PACKAGE – WEB
Open to: Any original package of related or thematic editorial content produced by a Magazine Website.
Criteria: Maximizes the potential of web-based publishing and reflects collaboration by editors and content creators. Elements may include but are not limited to web design, written content, blogs, video, photography, infographics, illustration, social media and user-generated content.
Entry Fee: $95 (early-bird by Jan 10); $120 (regular by Jan 15)
Last year’s winner: The Grid (“Are you going to eat that?“)
More info

ONLINE VIDEO
Open to: A single video produced by a Magazine Website or Tablet Magazine.
Criteria: Eligible content must have been published during 2013, be clearly relevant to the magazine’s editorial mandate, and be part of an editorial process.
Entry Fee: $95 (early-bird by Jan 10); $120 (regular by Jan 15)
Meet last year’s finalists
Last year’s winner
: Hazlitt (“Pagelicker 01: Irvine Welsh“)
More info

BLOGS
Open to: A regular series of original written content by one or more authors produced by a Magazine Website that has a recognizable unifying voice or theme.
Criteria: Eligible content must have been published during 2013, be clearly relevant to the Magazine Website’s editorial mandate, and be part of an editorial process. Entrants must submit the blog’s main URL and then up to 3 sub-URLs linking specific content for the jury’s attention. The jury will be instructed to review the provided URLs as well as navigate other areas of the site, though only written content is evaluated.
Entry Fee: $95 (early-bird by Jan 10); $120 (regular by Jan 15)
Last year’s winner
Science-ish (Maclean’s)
Read our interview with last year’s winning blogger Julia Belluz
More info

Finally, the category Magazine Website Design is open to submissions from all eligible companion sites and online-only magazines. This award goes to a magazine website with the most successful and original overall combination of visual and graphic design elements with functionality and user experience, including ease of navigation, readability of content, successful integration of audio/visual elements and a clear distinction between paid content/advertising and editorial content. More info.

The 2013 National Magazine Awards are now open for submissions at magazine-awards.com. The deadline for all entries is January 15. Enter by the early-bird deadline of January 10 and save.

The National Magazine Awards Foundation acknowledges the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Off the Page, with The Feathertale Review editor Brett Popplewell

Off the Page is an interview series that appears regularly on the Magazine Awards blog. Today we catch up with Brett Popplewell, editor of The Feathertale Review, winner of the 2012 National Magazine Award for Best Single Issue.

NMAF: The Feathertale Review has been dubbed the “illegitimate love child of Mad Magazine and The New Yorker.” We just saw your latest issue, no. 11, double in size to 128 pages. Is this a signal to readers that the child is growing up? And if so, where is it headed?

Brett Popplewell: It’s definitely a sign that the child is growing up. Where it’s heading, I have no idea.

Truth is our entire team has grown up since our launch in 2006. We were just kids back then who felt there was an absence of high- and low-brow humour magazines in the Canadian market and thought we could be the cork to plug that hole. Lee Wilson, Feathertale’s co-founder and art director, and I wanted to create something that would feel fresh and cutting edge but that would hark back to an age when magazines leaned entirely on illustration to bring their words to life. We’re the ones who started calling our creation the “illegitimate love child of Mad Magazine and The New Yorker” because it felt like the best way to describe it.

The Feathertale Review, Issue no. 1

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 1

We really started to grow up with our fourth issue (summer 2009). I finally started writing editorials to help nail a raison-d’etre for each issue and we began interviewing interesting people (David Rakoff, Stuart McLean, Patrick deWitt, Lynn Coady, etc.) in the magazine, using those interviews to try to answer some of life’s greatest questions, like: “What does it actually mean to be funny?” All of this added a creative depth to what we were doing.

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 4

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 4

That adolescent stage carried on until our ninth issue (Spring of 2012), which was later named Best Single Issue by the National Magazine Awards Foundation.

By that point Lee and I were both working fulltime with mass-market magazines and had a much better understanding of our industry and Feathertale’s place within it. We began wanting to use Feathertale to challenge what we and others thought a magazine actually was. That’s how we came up with the idea for Feathertale 9. That issue, which looked, read and felt like it was lost in time, was modeled after 250-year-old magazines in order to show readers how far magazines had evolved and changed since their initial creation back in 1731. I think the moment we started thinking about Feathertale on such a bold scale was when it grew up and became more than just the bastard love child of Mad Magazine and The New Yorker.

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 9

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 9, winner of Best Single Issue at the 2012 National Magazine Awards

We didn’t have it in us to make Feathertale 10 as crazy an innovation as its predecessor. So we sought instead to create a “swan song” issue that resembled some of our earlier issues and served to book-end a chapter of our lives.

After Feathertale 10 we had time to reflect on what we’d accomplished and assess what we thought was working and what wasn’t. We had contemplated ending the print product and concentrating on Feathertale.com, the online companion to the Review. Our $10 cover price hadn’t been doing us any favours on newsstands and our online readership had always outstripped our printed circulation. But we still believed in producing beautiful printed products and decided to double down on that belief. That’s when we started thinking about making the Review look less like a magazine and more like a book.

From a design standpoint, this made sense. We were starting to publish some much longer stories and Lee felt the long features would read better if we changed the design. So we shrunk the page size from the 8”x10” we’d been using for the first 10 issues to 5”x8”. We then doubled the length of the book to make sure it would still pack the roughly 35,000 words we’d been publishing in our previous issues. In the end, the adjustment made good business sense as well.

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 11

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 11

Feathertale is still a magazine of course, but our current issue (and our next one for that matter) does look a lot more like a book than a mag. I don’t know how that format will serve us on newsstands. We have one of the thicker spines out there right now, and I think we’ve got some pretty appealing covers but we don’t take up nearly as much space on the magazine rack. That said, our subscribers seem to be enjoying the new forma, which is encouraging. It’s also substantially cheaper for us to print the smaller layout and from what we’ve seen at festivals, people are more inclined to pay $10 (or even $15) for the new format. We’re under no pretense of being the first to come out at this size, but so far it makes sense for us.

NMAF: In addition to winning the National Magazine Award for Best Single Issue (for issue no. 9), Feathertale has also won NMAs for Humour and for Best Magazine Cover; remarkable achievements for any magazine, no less a young literary one. What impact have achievements like these made on Feathertale and its writers and artists?

Brett: The accolades have certainly helped us stay motivated, but this has never been a vanity project. Our first win for Best Magazine Cover of 2010 came as a shock, both to us and I think to others in our industry. That cover was really special to us. It was illustrated by a young artist in Oshawa named Dani Crosby. She had just graduated from Sheridan and didn’t have a huge portfolio when we handed her our magazine and told her to do as she pleased with it. There aren’t many magazines that will hand over that kind of opportunity to such a young and relatively inexperienced artist. When we won best cover, we were really just humbled and honoured to be recognized by our peers.

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 6, winner of Best Magazine Cover, 2010 National Magazine Awards

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 6, winner of Best Magazine Cover, 2010 National Magazine Awards

After our first NMA a lot of illustrators and writers who hadn’t really been looking at us started submitting work our way. It definitely helped us grow and added some more established voices to our ever-expanding list of contributors. I guess you could say that award helped us beef up subsequent issues, including Feathertale 9, which won Gold for Best Single Issue last year. I was surprised when we were nominated for that award as well and I was ecstatic when we won. I think what I’m most proud of about that issue is that we pulled it all together on a $7,000 budget. I can’t really explain how it feels to have published and edited a magazine on that kind of budget and then see it nominated alongside magazines that are easily 100 times our size.

Feathertale was probably the smallest magazine nominated for any awards last year, so to win one of the evening’s most prestigious was an unexpected honour, something Cathal Kelly (one of our frequent contributors) touched on when he tweeted that watching Feathertale win that NMA was, financially speaking, “like your home movies winning an Oscar.”

There were 37 contributors in that issue and each of them was integral to its success. I can’t speak for any of them, but I can say that I am extremely proud to have worked with each of them on that issue. I’m equally as proud of Cathal for picking up silver in the Humour category last year. We’ve always said we’re a humour magazine, and Cathal’s award and work helped validate that claim. He’s probably the most naturally gifted writer I’ve had the privilege to work with.

"Feathertale Man rewrites history..." Silver, Humour, 2012 National Magazine Awards

“Feathertale Man rewrites history…” Silver, Humour, 2012 National Magazine Awards

NMAF: You’ve spoken elsewhere about the early success story of Feathertale, where start-up funds from a successful anti-bullying comic-book venture seeded the start of the magazine, and support from Canadian arts funding has helped you grow. What lessons have you learned about publishing a literary magazine in Canada that might benefit other publishers, writers and artists out there?

Brett: The biggest lesson I’ve learned is you have to believe in the value of what you’re doing because you won’t necessarily see any benefit from your labours in your bank account. Canada is such a small market that it’s very hard to make a profit with this type of venture. Financially, Feathertale is subsidized by grant money and sales of Lee’s and my anti-bullying comic books. But aside from that, this whole thing survives on the passion of its creators. That passion comes and goes. There are times when each of us have wanted to run away from Feathertale but the longer we spend working on the project the more we realize that it’s like a child that deserves a shot at growing up and becoming a fully functioning adult. It has definitely grown up and matured, but it’s still not ready to feed itself or change its own diapers.

Publishing, especially in the 21st century, is a very fickle industry. Lee and I wandered into it without any real experience. We had some spectacular success early on with our anti-bullying comic books and have no regrets at having used that success to launch The Feathertale Review. We are fortunate to now have support from both the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council. I think it’s important for every Canadian to understand that if the Arts councils ever pulled out of funding literary journals in this country the entire industry would likely die, or at least cease to print.

NMAF: Who is D’Artagnan, really?

Brett: He’s the real brains behind this operation. The one who makes all this possible.

Seriously though, he’s the blue monkey who appears on all things Feathertale. We used to think of him as our Alfred E. Newman or Eustace Tilley, but he’s become more than that. He’s our face in this world. What’s his story? Why is he blue? We’ve been asking ourselves those questions for a long time now but still haven’t figured it out.

Brett Popplewell is the editor of The Feathertale Review, as well as a National Magazine Award-winning writer — he won Gold in the category Sports & Recreation at the 2011 National Magazine Awards for “The Team that Disappeared” (Sportsnet). Follow him on Twitter @b_popps.

Images courtesy Feathertale.com and National Magazine Awards Foundation.

Submissions are now being accepted for the 2013 National Magazine Awards. Deadline for entries: January 15.

Going for Gold: How to win a National Magazine Award

At last June’s MagNet magazines conference in Toronto, a golden panel of industry experts gathered to present a session called “Going for Gold: How to Create Award-Winning Content,” moderated by Deborah Rosser, president of Rosser & Associates.

The panellists were:

  • Carole Beaulieu, publisher and editor-in-chief of L’actualité, winner of more than 50 National Magazine Awards since she became EIC in 1998;
  • Sarah Fulford, editor-in-chief of Toronto Life, the most-nominated magazine at last year’s NMAs and former winner of Magazine of the Year (2007);
  • David Hayes, freelance writer (nominated for 14 NMAs during his career, winning a gold and a silver award) and member of the board of directors of the National Magazine Awards Foundation (NMAF);
  • Domenic Macri, art director at Report on Business and winner of 6 NMAs for his design and creative direction;
  • Patrick Walsh, editor-in-chief and brand manager of Outdoor Canada, winner of 21 National Magazine Awards since 1987, and former president of the NMAF.

Risk and Reward: The moderator began by asking each of the panellists to present the story of a challenging piece that won a National Magazine Award, and what lessons they took from the experience.

2008_torontolife2Sarah Fulford spoke about how breaking the rules helped Toronto Life to a surprise NMA win for best magazine cover of 2008. Sarah said she and her then art director Jessica Rose, whom she hired with this specific challenge in mind, took big risks on a cover about gun violence in Toronto, as they bucked the conventions for cover design with small cover lines and other elements reflecting thinking outside the box. The issue sold well on the newsstand and also impressed the NMA judges that year, as they gave it a Gold.

Domenic Macri spoke in a similar vein about a magazine cover that won Gold the following year, 2009, at the NMAs. The Julie Dickson cover presented a challenge because the editors had agreed not to put her portrait on the magazine cover. Domenic showed the audience several of his drafts and mockups that he went through on his way to finally developing the final cover, saying that what he learned from the experience was although there are certain elements required of a good cover, “you don’t have to take the same approach all the time. I think we won the award because we came up with new directions, and because of the words.”

David Hayes mentioned an episode from 1990 when a feature story he’d written for Toronto Life wasn’t entered for an NMA that year, and after talking with his editor, who said he wasn’t able to enter the piece that year due to budget constraints, he learned that he could enter the NMAs himself. Several years later he took that experience to heart when he again discovered that an editor wouldn’t enter his story, so he entered it himself and it ended up winning Gold. “You never know what the jury will decide,” he reminded the audience, “so as a writer if you are proud of your work you should enter it.”

Patrick Walsh described the story of a controversial article he commissioned about the death of a hunter in Newfoundland, called “Another Fine Day Afield.” As an editor he felt that the story hadn’t been covered well in other media, and though it would be a legal, financial and editorial challenge to pursue the story for Outdoor Canada, he decided to take the risk. The risk paid off when the magazine story he published was picked up by CBC’s The Fifth Estate and NBC’s Inside Edition, and his writer Charles Wilkins won a Gold National Magazine Award in Sports & Recreation.

Carole Beaulieu also touted the benefits of taking risks and believing in the work you produce. She talked about a piece from last year she commissioned from a writer about Pauline Marois. Although Quebec news had been saturated with stories about the premier, Carole felt there was room for more if they could find the right angle and give it the right depth. She sent her writer to spend time with Mdm Marois at her hairdresser’s, achieving a kind of intimate portrait not yet seen, and L’actualité created a newsprint insert–what it is now calling a “mini-book” and making a semi-regular feature for the magazine–to accommodate the 16-page story. And at this year’s NMAs, “L’éttoffe d’un premier ministre,” by journalist Noémi Mercier, won Gold in Profiles.

Quote-Unquote: On the significance of winning a National Magazine Award and why we strive for award-winning content.

Sarah: “An award is useful for communicating to our stakeholders that we are successful. It adds momentum to what we do every day at the magazine… We create content to satisfy our readers, not to win awards. But it is our creators who get the awards and the cash prize, and for an editor, that’s an honour.”

David: “As writers, what we have is our reputation, and what we create should stand on its own. Awards are a feather in your cap, not the cap itself.”

Patrick: “We won because the story was beautifully written, because it was longform [5000 words]… We also took risks and winning the award was a measure of that.”

Carole: “I think we should always believe in what we do. Successful magazine stories have that ‘wow’ factor, and with everything we do we try to achieve that. You know that story matters, that content matters. If you believe you achieved success then you should enter, because then you’ll know if your peers [the jury] agree; that it made them say, ‘wow.’”

The Bottom Line: The moderator asked each panellist to distill one piece of advice for winning a National Magazine Award.

Domenic: Strive for strong collaboration between editorial and art in creating your content. Success is a product of a strong team.

Carole: Don’t take things too seriously. Trust your instincts and never give up on a great story.

Sarah: The most successful pieces are the ones where the creators were passionate and took risks.

Patrick: Be strategic, because the more you enter the more you are likely to win. If your aim is to win awards then enter as much as you can.

David: Advice to writers: write well. And advice to editors: hire writers who write well.

In Summary: Accept challenges, take risks, think differently, be passionate, find (or be) the best creator, work together, never give up on a good story, believe in your work and enter as much as you can. That, and always strive for the ‘wow’ factor! 

On behalf of the Canadian magazine industry, thank you to the panellists for sharing your wisdom.

Related posts:
Off the Page, with Patrick Walsh
National Magazine Award-winning Covers, 2007-2010
Winners of the 36th National Magazine Awards

More:
Award-winning work in the National Magazine Awards archive
National Magazine Awards digital Gold Book (free)

The 36th National Magazine Awards Gold Book

Make your summer reading the National Magazine Awards digital Gold Book. More than forty magazine stories and visual spreads representing the Gold winners from the 36th annual National Magazine Awards, available FREE for your computer or mobile device.

Including National Magazine Award-winning work by these Canadian literary and visual artists:

Caroline Adderson, Dave Cameron, Karen Connelly, Craig Davidson, Sierra Skye Gemma, Jessica Johnson, Tom Jokinen, Peter Ash Lee, Angus Rowe MacPherson, Greg McArthur, Leah McLaren, Conor Mihell, Jonathan Montpetit, Alison Motluk, Mark Peckmezian, Graeme Smith, Emma Teitel, Chris Turner, Jeff Warren, Sam Weber and more!

With stories from Canada’s best magazines, including Adbusters, Avenue, Azure, Canada’s History, Canadian Notes & Queries, Eighteen Bridges, Explore, Geist, Maclean’s, Maisonneuve, Reader’s Digest, Report on Business, Sportsnet, The Feathertale Review, The Grid, The New Quarterly, The Walrus, Toronto Life and more!

Congratulations to all of this year’s National Magazine Award winners, and happy summer reading to all!

Canada’s Best Magazine Covers of 2012

At the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala last week, the Gold Award for Best Magazine Cover went to Adbusters, for the cover of their 100th issue, entitled “Are We Happy Yet?”

"Are We Happy Yet?" - Adbusters, Art Direction by Will Brown and Pedro Inoue

“Are We Happy Yet?” – Adbusters, Art Direction by Will Brown and Pedro Inoue

Why the judges picked this cover: “It resonated loudly and immediately on all counts, with its tight connection between the striking cover image and the solitary cover line. An instant classic… [it] challenges one of the primary goals of advertising–to stimulate desires–and implicitly answers its own question. At once strong, direct, incisive, compelling and complete: a brilliant magazine cover.”

The Silver award for Magazine Covers went to Maisonneuve.

"Issue 45" - Maisonneuve, Art Direction by Anna Minzhulina

“Issue 45″ – Maisonneuve, Art Direction by Anna Minzhulina

Congratulations to all the winners of the 36th National Magazine Awards.

Related post:
Meet the NMA Finalists for Magazine Covers

Announcing the winners of the 36th National Magazine Awards!

Tonight the National Magazine Awards Foundation (NMAF) presented the winners of the 36th annual National Magazine Awards at a gala this evening in Toronto at The Carlu, presented by CDS Global, and hosted by Canadian actor Zaib Shaikh. Gold, Silver and Honourable Mention awards were presented in 47 categories, after the NMAF’s 250 volunteer judges evaluated 2000 submissions from nearly 200 Canadian consumer magazines.

[Version française]
[Complete list of winners PDF]
[36th NMA Gold Book]

Magazine of the Year

The coveted award for Magazine of the Year went to Corporate Knights. Honourable Mention for Magazine of the Year was awarded to Cottage Life, UPPERCASE and Urbania.

The award for Tablet Magazine of the Year went to Canadian House & Home for their “Colour Issue” from March 2012.

The award for Magazine Website of the Year went to Hazlitt, the online literary magazine published by Random House Canada.

Renowned Canadian editor, teacher and mentor Stephen Trumper was presented with the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement.

The winner of the award for Best New Magazine Writer was Sierra Skye Gemma, for her story “The Wrong Way” published in The New Quarterly.

Top Winning Magazines at the 36th National Magazine Awards:

Magazine

Gold

Silver

HM

L’actualité

6

0

18

The Grid

5

2

15

The Walrus

4

2

17

Hazlitt

3

0

1

Report on Business

2

5

13

Maisonneuve

2

3

9

Maclean’s

2

2

16

Corduroy

2

0

0

Toronto Life

1

4

24

Sportsnet

1

2

7

Eighteen Bridges

1

1

8

Canadian House & Home

1

1

5

Explore

1

1

4

Reader’s Digest

1

1

2

The Feathertale Review

1

1

0

Québec Science

0

2

1

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE AWARDS
The article “Building with the Brigadier” (Report on Business) by Greg McArthur and Graeme Smith—about the SNC-Lavalin investment in Libya—was the most celebrated individual article of the 36th National Magazine Awards, winning two Gold Awards, in Business and in Investigative Reporting, as well as Silver in Politics & Public Interest.

The Gold award for Best Single Issue went to The Feathertale Review (“Issue 9”), the Toronto-based independent arts magazine. The Silver went to Toronto Life (“The Loneliest Man in Toronto”).

The Gold award for the best Magazine Cover of the year went to Adbusters for their fast food satire “Are We Happy Yet?” by Will Brown and Pedro Inoue. “Issue 45” of Maisonneuve by Anna Minzhulina took the Silver award.

The new online literary magazine Hazlitt, in addition to winning Magazine Website of the Year, also took the Gold awards for Magazine Website Design and for best Online Video, the latter for the first installment of their interview series “Pagelicker 01: Irvine Welsh.”

Journalist Catherine Dubé of L’actualité won her eighth National Magazine Award with a Gold in Service: Health & Family, for “Faut-il interdire le cellulaire à l’école?” – one of six Gold awards won by L’actualité, the most of any magazine.

Journalists from L’actualité also won Gold in Politics & Public Interest (“Jason, le missionaire de Harper” by Alec Castonguay); in Service: Personal Finance & Business (“La guerre des retraites est commencée” by Annick Poitras); in Profiles (“L’étoffe d’un premier ministre?” by Noémi Mercier); in Photojournalism & Photo Essay (“Au coeur d’Attawapiskat” by Renaud Philippe); and in Spot Illustration (“Papa souffre, moi aussi” by Gérard Dubois).

The Grid led all publications with 7 total awards, including 5 Gold Awards: in Editorial Package: Web for their feature “Are You Going to Eat That?”; in Single Service Article Package for “The Grid Guide to Getting Hitched”; in How-To for “The Grid Guide to Buying a Condo”; in Creative Photography for “Truckin’ A!” by Angus Rowe MacPherson; and in Art Direction of a Single Magazine Article, for “Chef’s Guide to Toronto” by Vanessa Wyse.

Corduroy, an independent style and fashion magazine based in Toronto, won Gold for Art Direction of an Entire Issue (“Issue 10”) and in Fashion (“ten covers x ten models”), with art direction by Peter Ash Lee.

Writer Chris Turner led all individuals with four nominations and won Gold in Travel for “On Tipping in Cuba” in The Walrus. Mr. Turner has now won nine National Magazine Awards.

The Walrus won 6 total awards including 4 Gold: in addition to the Travel category, also winning Gold in Illustration (“Apocalypse Soon” by Sam Weber); in One-of-a-Kind (“What Would Tommy Douglas Think?” by Tom Jokinen); and in Society (“Fade to Light” by Dave Cameron).

In Words & Pictures the Gold award went to “On Thin Ice” in Canada’s History, by Terry Mosher (a.k.a. Aislin), Mark Reid and Michel Groleau.

Writer Alison Motluk won Gold in Health & Medicine for her story “Is Egg Donation Dangerous?” in Maisonneuve. For Ms. Motluk this is her third National Magazine Award. The Montreal quarterly’s other Gold award came in the category Best Short Feature, for “Notes from the End of the War” by Jonathan Montpetit.

In Fiction the Gold went to Alberta novelist Caroline Adderson for her short story “Ellen-Celine, Celine-Ellen” published in Canadian Notes & Queries. Former Governor General Literary Award winner Patrick deWitt won the Silver for “The Looking-Ahead Artist” in Brick.

In Poetry the Gold winner was former Governor General Literary Award winner Karen Connelly for her poem “The Speed of Rust, or, He Marries” in Geist. Sue Goyette won the Silver for her series of “Fashion” poems in Prairie Fire.

The story “Whale Rising” by Jeff Warren in Reader’s Digest was a double winner, taking Gold in Science, Technology & Environment and Silver in Essays.

Sportsnet took the Gold in Editorial Package: Print, for “Sports that can kill.” Québec Science won Silver for “50 défis pour 2050.”

Emma Teitel of Maclean’s won the Gold award in Columns. Ms. Teitel won Honourable Mention last year in the category Best New Magazine Writer.

Six of the ten finalists in the new category Blogs were from Maclean’s, with the blog “Science-ish” by Julia Belluz—a former winner of the National Magazine Award for Best Student Writer—winning Gold. Paul Wells won the Silver for “Inkless Wells.”

In Portrait Photography the Gold went to “Never Left Art School,” a series of portraits of artist Douglas Coupland by Mark Peckmezian for Montecristo.

The new French-language literary magazine Nouveau Projet won its first National Magazine Award for “Faux self mon amour” by Fanny Britt in the category Personal Journalism.

Eighteen Bridges gained ten nominations and won Gold in Humour for “The Hairs about our Secrets” by Jessica Johnson.

Toronto Life led all publications with 29 nominations, winning a Gold in Arts & Entertainment for “Something Borrowed” by Leah McLaren.

The new Globe & Mail magazine Globe Style Advisor won its first National Magazine Award, a Gold in the category Beauty for “Lady Obscura.”

Also winning Gold Awards:

Visit magazine-awards.com for the complete list of winners and to download the commemorative 36th National Magazine Awards Gold Book.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The National Magazine Awards Foundation acknowledges the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage, as well as financial support from the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario, and the Ontario Media Development Corporation. The National Magazine Awards Foundation gratefully acknowledges its suppliers and its contributors who donated gifts in kind to support the awards program. We thank them for their generosity, interest and expertise.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL MAGAZINE AWARDS FOUNDATION
The National Magazine Awards Foundation is a bilingual, not-for-profit institution whose mission is to recognize and promote excellence in the content and creation of Canadian print and digital publications through an annual program of awards and national publicity efforts. magazine-awards.com

Meet the NMA Finalists for Words & Pictures

The National Magazine Award for Words & Pictures goes to the best example of a magazine article whose impact lies in the successful integration of text and visuals as inseparable elements, reflecting collaboration between writers, editors, visual artists and art directors. The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed at the 36th NMA Gala on June 7.
[INFO & TICKETS]

Here are this year’s nominees…

"On Thin Ice" (Canada's History)

“On Thin Ice” (Canada’s History) – Text and illustrations by Aislin, art direction by Michel Groleau, edited by Mark Reid

"Play it Again, Sam" (Cottage Life)

“Play it Again, Sam” (Cottage Life) – Text by Jay Teitel, photography by Derek Shapton, art direction by Kim Zagar, edited by Blair Eveleigh

"Avons-nous un devoir envers eux?" (ELLE Quebec)

“Avons-nous un devoir envers eux?” (ELLE Québec) – Text by Dominique Forget, photography by Tim Flach, art direction by Nancy Pavan, edited by Louise Dugas

"For Love of Country" (enRoute)

“For Love of Country” (enRoute) – Text by Jean-François Légaré, photography by Leda & St. Jacques, art direction by Nathalie Cusson, photo editing by Julien Beaupré Ste-Marie, edited by Philippe Gohier

"5 Star Tribute" (More)

“5 Star Tribute” (More) – Text by Kim Pittaway, art direction by Faith Cochran, edited by Linda Lewis and Sarah Moore, with contributions from Shelley Frayer.

"We Built That" - Report on Business

“We Built That” (Report on Business) – Text by John Daly, photography by Cindy Blazevic, art direction by Domenic Macri, edited by John Daly

"The Six Habits of Highly Successful Art Collectors" (Report on Business)

“The Six Habits of Highly Successful Art Collectors” (Report on Business) – Text by Sara Angel, photography by Markian Lozowchuk, art direction by Domenic Macri, edited by Dave Morris and David Fielding

"Ringmasters" (The Walrus)

“Ringmasters” (The Walrus) – Text by Sean Michaels, photography by Roger LeMoyne, art direction by Brian Morgan, edited by Sasha Chapman.

"Oh, for Just One Time..." (Up Here)

“Oh, for Just One Time…” (Up Here) – Text by Margo Pfeif; photography by Lee Narraway, Eric McNair-Landry, and Sarah McNair-Landry; art direction by John Pekelsky; edited by Aaron Spitzer

Congratulations to all the nominees in Words & Pictures. The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed at the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 at The Carlu in Toronto. [INFO & TICKETS]

Meet the NMA Finalists for:
Art Direction for an Entire Issue
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Best New Magazine Writer
Illustration
Magazine Covers
Online Video
Portrait Photography
Magazine Website of the Year
Best Single Issue
Tablet Magazine of the Year

Meet the NMA Finalists for Best Single Issue

The National Magazine Award for Best Single Issue rewards general excellence of an individual issue of a magazine in terms of quality of content and design, originality and relevance to its intended audience. As an integrated category this award celebrates the collaborative effort of editors, art directors and content creators in producing a successful magazine edition. The Gold and Silver winners in Best Single Issue will be revealed at the 36th NMA Gala on June 7. [INFO & TICKETS]

Here are this year’s nominees…

Cottage Life, June 2012. Editor: Penny Caldwell. Art Director: Kim Zagar. Including contributions from Blair Eveleigh, Martin Zibauer, Michelle Kelly, Liann Bobechko, Jackie Davis, Vicki Hornsby, Quinn Banting

Cottage Life, June 2012. Editor: Penny Caldwell. Art Director: Kim Zagar. Including contributions from Blair Eveleigh, Martin Zibauer, Michelle Kelly, Liann Bobechko, Jackie Davis, Vicki Hornsby, Quinn Banting and Cottage Life contributors.

About this issue: The third installment of Cottage Life‘s twenty-fifth anniversary series celebrated the unrivaled sensation of the Canadian lake swim in a cover story by Scotiabank Giller Prize-winning author Joseph Boyden. The magazine’s consistent service to its hungry readers continued unabated with an installment of its regular Grill Guide (to essential sides) and a how-to for DIY boathouse builders. Page after page of some of Canada’s best magazine writers, photographers and illustrators made it an especially memorable issue.

enRoute, November 2012. Editor: Ilana Weitzman. Art Director: Nathalie Cusson.

enRoute, November 2012. Editor: Ilana Weitzman. Art Director: Nathalie Cusson. Including contributions from enRoute staff and contributors.

About this issue: enRoute’s annual look at the interconnectedness of food and travel took on new shapes for its November 2012 issue. Centered primarily upon the title of “Canada’s Best New Restaurants,” readers were invited into a nation-wide search for Canada’s top-10 new restaurants. Specific emphasis was placed upon Canadian chefs and Toronto’s burgeoning food culture. A series of delectable topics were also attended to, inclusive of sea lettuce, vermouth and international dining experiences set in Tokyo, Puerto Rico and Birmingham.

LE Must, June 2012. Redactrice: Yacka Simard. Directrice artistique: Lyne Gosselin. Avec contributions par Marjolaine Jetté, Martin Lemire, Marion Renard, Maxime Canton

LE Must, juin 2012. Rédactrice: Lyne Gosselin. Directrice artistique: Yacka Simard. Avec des contributions de Marjolaine Jetté, Martin Lemire, Marion Renard, Maxime Canton.

About this issue: LE Must‘s summer guide to “Santé alimentaire” was an exaltation of all things green; an homage to herbs, a celebration of salad. The editors curated a series of healthy recipes, including desserts, bolstered by stunning photography and practical guides to cooking and eating according to the body’s needs. Plus an in-depth look at school breakfast clubs in Quebec and a nostalgic ode to the family picnic (complete with portraits of a VW microbus).

Maisonneuve, Spring 2012. Editors: Drew Nelles, Amelia Schonbek. Art Director: Anna Minzhulina. Including contributions from Maisonneuve staff and contributors.

Maisonneuve, Spring 2012. Editors: Drew Nelles, Amelia Schonbek. Art Director: Anna Minzhulina. Including contributions from Maisonneuve staff and contributors.

About this issue: Maisonneuve’s Spring 2012 issue celebrated its ten-year anniversary. The decade-old publication–and Canada’s reigning Magazine of the Year–chose to emphasize the importance of its birthday with the addition of sixteen pages and contributions from top Canadian writers. Among the latter was Tim Falconer who authored a personal reflection into the science of music as well as Paul Gettlich who delved into the Occupy Toronto movement. Commonwealth Prize winning author Demi Y. Bechard also offered a compelling memoir regarding the criminal past of his father. And in a cross-Canada tour of Nunavut, Vancouver and Montreal Maisonneuve explored the human condition.

The Feathertale Review, Issue 9, June 2012. Editor: Brett Popplewell. Art Director: Lee H. Wilson. Including contributions from Benson Lee, Sharis Shahmiryan, Corina Milic.

The Feathertale Review, Issue 9, June 2012. Editor: Brett Popplewell. Art Director: Lee H. Wilson. Including contributions from Benson Lee, Sharis Shahmiryan, Corina Milic.

About this issue: The Featherale Review’s mandate is to provide a literary voice for a new contingent of Canadian creators while also giving rise to breakout developments in the world of art.  The single issue that was Feathertale No.9 accomplished these very goals with contributions from 33 writers and artists. A regard for timelessness was maintained throughout as the content was intended to be read as if produced at any point during the past 200 years, a nod to Edward Cave, a.k.a. Sylvanus Urban, who produced the first magazine in 1731.

The Grid, May 10, 2012. Editors: Laas Turnbull, Lianne George. Art Director: Vanessa Wyse. Including contributions from The Grid staff and contributors.

The Grid, May 10, 2012. Editors: Laas Turnbull, Lianne George. Art Director: Vanessa Wyse. Including contributions from The Grid staff and contributors.

About this issue: The Grid‘s Chef’s Guide to Toronto graced the pages of its inaugural issue in 2011, and the 2012 installment once again whetted urban appetites for the latest culinary creations and foodie trends, as well as a guide to the city’s new food trucks. The indispensable weekly guide to Canada’s largest city stimulated readers with colourful graphics on every page, a hallmark of its award-winning design. Add in a dash of Edward Keenan’s widely read column, excellent reviews and handy tips for how to become a firefighter, and you have one delectable issue.

The Walrus, November 2012. Editor: John Macfarlane. Art Director: Brian Morgan. Including contributions from Kyle Carsten Wyatt, Sasha Chapman, Rachel Giese, Amy Macfarlane, Michael Lista, Nick Mount, Paul Kim, Meredith Holigroski, Pamela Capraru

The Walrus, November 2012. Editor: John Macfarlane. Art Director: Brian Morgan. Including contributions from Kyle Carsten Wyatt, Sasha Chapman, Rachel Giese, Amy Macfarlane, Michael Lista, Nick Mount, Paul Kim, Meredith Holigroski, Pamela Capraru

About this issue: The November 2012 issue of The Walrus addressed North American politics as the U.S. breached its Presidential election. Pulitzer Prize winner Chris Hedges addressed a pressing political question in his cover story that asked what happens to Canada if America fails?  Working alongside Hedges was photographer Alan Chin whose “A Metaphor for America” images drew sobering ties between Canada’s economy and America’s political climate. These governmental considerations were further paired with reviews of food truck booms, the dancing career of Peggy Bajer and the new $20 bill.

Toronto Life, May 2012. Editor: Sarah Fulford. Art Director: Christine Dewairy. Including contributions from Toronto Life staff and contributors.

Toronto Life, May 2012. Editor: Sarah Fulford. Art Director: Christine Dewairy. Including contributions from Toronto Life staff and contributors.

About this issue: Toronto Life‘s May 2012 issue remained true to the magazine’s established history of covering stories that matter most to Torontonians, this time via its profile of embattled mayor Rob Ford. Author Marci MacDonald followed Ford’s political trajectory with precision and a cold review of facts. A focus upon the city’s best in food, fashion and real estate was also maintained via its coverage of pop-up restaurants, spring apparel trends and chic loft conversions.

Congratulations to all the nominees in Best Single Issue. The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed at the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 at The Carlu in Toronto. [INFO & TICKETS]

Meet the NMA Finalists for:
Art Direction for an Entire Issue
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Best New Magazine Writer
Illustration
Magazine Covers
Online Video
Magazine Website of the Year

Meet the NMA Finalists for Best Online Video

A new category for this year’s National Magazine Awards, the award for Online Video will go to the best production by a magazine website or tablet magazine. This year there are 5 finalists, and the Gold and Silver winners will be revealed at the 36th NMA gala on June 7. [INFO & TICKETS]

And the nominees are:

1. “Condo Balcony Makeover” (Canadian House & Home):

What the judges said: “The perfect example of a how-to video. The hosts are casual and comfortable in their narration/explanation of the makeover. Visuals showing before and after are used to great effect. Strong editing and camera work carry this well-paced video that doesn’t leave out details and offers solutions in under three minutes.”

2. “Les coulisses du reportage mode Icônes” (ELLE Québec)

What the judges said: “Excellent use of interviews interspersed with behind-the-scenes footage to highlight this unique fashion shoot. The editing keeps the pace moving along quickly and the interview subjects are dynamic and interesting. It’s journalism with style.”

3. “Pagelicker 01: Irvine Welsh” (Hazlitt)

What the judges said: “A video that captures a moment and holds you there through intimate camera work,  a contemplative soundtrack, and a sense of honesty fuelled by humour and one nervous-yet-together host, who draws out kernels of information a conventional interview would miss. Creative, quirky and excellent production quality.”

4. “Reboot on Life” (Ottawa Citizen Style)

What the judges said: “The pace of this short video is spot on, and the illustrator does a great job of moving the piece along to the voices of the narrators. Excellent sound quality. The overall communication is clear and well paced. Perfect length. Effective and memorable.”

5. “Toronto’s National Anthem” (The Grid)

What the judges said: “A strong example of what web video should be. Simple, clean, short, and communicates everything it needs to in under two minutes. This playful, well composed song’s apathetic tone is matched by playful visuals and packaged in a solid edit. A catchy tune that captures the spirit of the city.”

Congratulations to all the nominees in Online Video. The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed at the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 at The Carlu in Toronto. [INFO & TICKETS]

Meet the NMA Finalists for:
Art Direction for an Entire Issue
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Best New Magazine Writer
Illustration
Magazine Covers

Meet the NMA Finalists for Magazine Covers

A great magazine cover attracts the reader with alluring images and solid display; the perfect blend of editorial and design that makes the magazine such a unique and special medium. At this year’s National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 [INFO & TICKETS] one of these 10 nominees will earn the right to be called Canada’s best magazine cover:

"Are We Happy Yet?" - Adbusters, Art Direction by Will Brown and Pedro Inoue

“Are We Happy Yet?” – Adbusters, Art Direction by Will Brown and Pedro Inoue

"March/April 2012" - Azure, Art Direction by Concrete Design Communications

“March/April 2012″ – Azure, Art Direction by Concrete Design Communications

"The New Oilpatch" - Canadian Business, Art Direction by John Montgomery

“The New Oilpatch” – Canadian Business, Art Direction by John Montgomery

"The Secret Khadr File" - Maclean's, Art Direction by Stephen Gregory

“The Secret Khadr File” – Maclean’s, Art Direction by Stephen Gregory

"Issue 45" - Maisonneuve, Art Direction by Anna Minzhulina

“Issue 45″ – Maisonneuve, Art Direction by Anna Minzhulina

"Colombia" - Report on Business, Art Direction by Domenic Macri

“Colombia” – Report on Business, Art Direction by Domenic Macri

"January 12, 2012" - The Grid, Art Direction by Vanessa Wyse

“January 12, 2012″ – The Grid, Art Direction by Vanessa Wyse

"That Time We Beat the Americans" - The Walrus, Art Direction by Brian Morgan

“That Time We Beat the Americans” – The Walrus, Art Direction by Brian Morgan & Anita Kunz

"The Northwest Passage" -  Up Here, Art Direction by John Pekelsky

“The Northwest Passage” – Up Here, Art Direction by John Pekelsky

"July/August 2012" - Vancouver Magazine, Art Direction by Randall Watson

“July/August 2012″ – Vancouver Magazine, Art Direction by Randall Watson

Congratulations to all the nominees in Magazine Covers. The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed at the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 at The Carlu in Toronto. [INFO & TICKETS]

Meet the NMA Finalists for:
Art Direction for an Entire Issue
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Best New Magazine Writer
Illustration

Announcing the Nominees for the 36th National Magazine Awards!

Today the NMAF announces the nominees for the 36th annual National Magazine Awards!

[Version française]
[PDF Nominations List]
[Tickets]

In the category Magazine of the Year the jury has selected four finalists:

Corporate Knights
Cottage Life
Uppercase
Urbania

Nominated for Tablet Magazine of the Year are Canadian House & Home (“The Colour Issue”), Maclean’s (“Canada’s Best Restaurants”) and Chez Soi (“Noël 100% déco”).

And the nominees for Magazine Website of the Year are Hazlitt, Maclean’s and Toronto Life.

The winner of the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, announced on April 30, is Stephen Trumper.

Leading all magazines with 29 nominations for this year’s National Magazine Awards is Toronto Life, followed by L’actualité (24), The Walrus (23), The Grid (22), Maclean’s and Report on Business (20 each).

Top Nominated Magazines for the 36th National Magazine Awards:

Magazine

Written

Integrated

Visual

Special

Total

Toronto Life

19

4

4

2

29

L’actualité

20

0

4

0

24

The Walrus

15

3

5

0

23

The Grid

8

7

7

0

22

Maclean’s

17

1

0

2

20

Report on Business

13

3

4

0

20

Maisonneuve

10

2

1

1

14

Cottage Life

4

3

2

1

10

Eighteen Bridges

10

0

0

0

10

Sportsnet

9

0

1

0

10

enRoute

3

2

4

0

9

The New Quarterly

7

0

0

1

8

Magazine of the Year Finalist

Magazine of the Year Finalist

Nine magazines are nominated for National Magazine Awards for the first time:
Chez Soi
Globe Style Advisor
(3 nominations)
Hazlitt
(4 nominations)
Infopresse
Le Must
New Trail
Nouveau Projet
(2 nominations)
Ottawa Citizen Style

Write Magazine

Chris Turner leads all individual finalists with 4 nominations in written categories for his work in Canadian Geographic, Marketing and The Walrus. Garnering 3 individual nominations are Catherine Dubé (L’actualité), Dan Robson (Sportsnet), Iain Marlow (Report on Business) and Dominique Forget (ELLE Québec, Jobboom and L’actualité).

Magazine of the Year Finalist

Magazine of the Year Finalist

The article “Building with the Brigadier” (Report on Business) by Greg McArthur and Graeme Smith has the distinction of being nominated in 3 categories: Business, Investigative Reporting and Politics & Public Interest.

The 10 finalists for the best Canadian Magazine Cover of 2012 come from Adbusters, Azure, Canadian Business, Maclean’s, Maisonneuve, Report on Business, The Grid, The Walrus, Up Here and Vancouver.

There are 8 finalists for the award for Best Single Issue: Cottage Life (“June 2012”), enRoute (“The Food Issue”), LE Must (“Santé alimentaire”), Maisonneuve (“Tenth Anniversary Issue”), The Feathertale Review (“Issue 9”), The Grid (“May 10”), The Walrus (“November 2012”) and Toronto Life (“The Loneliest Man in Toronto”).

The 3 finalists for Best New Magazine Writer are Chris Hampton (for “The Place Where Art Sleeps”; Maisonneuve), Sierra Skye Gemma (for “The Wrong Way”; The New Quarterly), and May Jeong (“The Cult of Pastor Song”; Toronto Life).

Magazine of the Year Finalist

Magazine of the Year Finalist

In addition to the new category Tablet Magazine of the Year, for 2012 the NMAF created 2 other new categories for digital content. In the new integrated category Online Video, the 5 finalists are “Balcony Makeover” (Canadian House & Home), “Les coulisses du reportage mode Icône” (ELLE Québec), “Pagelicker 01: Irvine Welsh” (Hazlitt), “Reboot on Life” (Ottawa Citizen Style), and “Toronto’s National Anthem” (The Grid).

Of the 10 finalists in the new written category Blogs, 6 are from Maclean’s, 2 from Torontoist, and 1 each from L’actualité and Today’s Parent.

Congratulations to all the finalists!
[PDF Nominations List]

Magazine of the Year Finalist

Magazine of the Year Finalist

The 36th annual National Magazine Awards Gala
Join us for the 36th annual National Magazine Awards, Friday June 7 at the fabulous Carlu in Toronto. [Tickets]

Gold and Silver awards will be handed down on June 7 in 24 written categories, 12 visual categories and 6 integrated categories. All other finalists will receive Honourable Mention. Winners will also be celebrated in 5 special categories: Outstanding Achievement, Best New Magazine Writer, Magazine Website of the Year, Tablet Magazine of the Year, and Magazine of the Year.

Gold winners in written, visual and integrated categories (except Best Single Issue) receive a cash prize of $1000; Silver winners $500. The winner of Best New Magazine Writer receives a cash prize of $500.

Credit Changes
If you are a National Magazine Award nominee, please let us know of any credit changes to your nomination no later than Thursday May 9, 2013.

Thank you!
A grand thank you to all of our judges who evaluated this year’s entries to the National Magazine Awards. From nearly 2,000 individual entries nationwide, the NMAF’s 251 volunteer judges nominated a total of 365 submissions from 87 different Canadian magazines for awards in 47 written, visual, integrated and special categories.

Acknowledgements
The National Magazine Awards Foundation acknowledges the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage, as well as financial support from the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario, and the Ontario Media Development Corporation. The National Magazine Awards Foundation gratefully acknowledges its suppliers and its contributors who donated gifts in kind to support the awards program. We thank them for their generosity, interest and expertise.

NMA_SM_May1

A Brief Guide to entering Digital Content in the National Magazine Awards

The National Magazine Awards are open to content from all Canadian consumer magazines, whether they are published in print, online or in a tablet edition.
[Version française ici]

Where previously we distinguished between Print and Digital Magazines, this year we are further clarifying the difference between three types of magazine publishing:

  • Print Magazine
  • Magazine Website (companion site or online-only magazine)
  • Tablet Magazine

Most categories are open to content from any of these types, though specific categories have certain restrictions. For all clarifications, see the list of categories and rules and eligibility.

There is now a Special Award for each of these three types:

  • Magazine of the Year
  • Magazine Website of the Year
  • Tablet Magazine of the Year

A single publication may enter any and all of these 3 special categories if they meet the eligibility and category criteria.

CATEGORIES EXCLUSIVELY FOR DIGITAL CREATIONS
There are six categories open exclusively to content from either Magazine Websites or Tablet Magazines, or both:

Blogs: This written category is open to a regular series of original written content produced by a Magazine Website that has a recognizable unifying voice or theme. Entries may consist of up to ten (10) blog posts by one or more authors.

Online Video: This integrated category is open to a single video produced by a Magazine Website or Tablet Magazine.

Magazine Website Design (formerly Best Digital Design): This visual category will reward a Magazine Website with the most successful and original overall combination of visual and graphic design elements with functionality and user experience.

Editorial Package—Web (formerly Best Multimedia Feature): This integrated category is open to any original package of related or thematic editorial content produced by a Magazine Website that best serves its intended audience by maximizing the potential of web-based publishing, and that reflects collaboration by editors and content creators. Elements may include but are not limited to written content, blogs, video, photography, data visualization, illustration, social media and user-generated content.

Tablet Magazine of the Year: This special category is open to any single issue of a Tablet Magazine that successfully fulfills its editorial mission by representing the highest journalistic standards and effectively serving its intended audience by maximizing the possibilities afforded by the medium of tablet publishing.

Magazine Website of the Year: This special category is open to any Magazine Website that successfully fulfills its editorial mission by representing the highest journalistic standards and effectively serving its intended audience by maximizing the possibilities afforded by the medium of web-based publishing.

ENTERING DIGITAL CONTENT IN OTHER CATEGORIES
Except where noted in specific category restrictions, content from Magazine Websites and Tablet Magazines is eligible in all National Magazine Awards categories.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
Check out our Digital FAQ for more information about how we define digital magazines, how to submit content from tablet editions, how the judging process works, and more.

ABOUT THE PROCESS
Each year the National Magazine Awards Foundation conducts surveys, solicits feedback and hosts round-table discussions with key stakeholders in order to ensure that our awards program is in tune with developments in the Canadian magazine industry.

Any changes that are made to the program reflect the consideration of numerous experts from relevant fields as well as the Judging Committee and Board of Directors of the NMAF.

The NMAF is grateful to those who volunteered their time to provide us with feedback and sit on our 2012 Digital Round Table and other committees.

With any additional questions please feel free to contact us.

Visit magazine-awards.com to submit. The deadline is January 16, 2013.

[Version française ici]

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