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Off the Page, with Canada’s History editor Mark Reid

Off the Page appears regularly on the Magazine Awards blog. Today we catch up with Mark Reid, editor of Canada’s History, winner of the 2012 National Magazine Award for Words & Pictures.

NMAF: Canada’s History (formerly known as The Beaver) is one of this country’s oldest publications, six years away from its centennial. What do you consider the mandate of the magazine to be, and has this changed much in the past 94 years?

Mark Reid (Photo: Marianne Helm)

Mark Reid (Photo: Marianne Helm)

Mark: The mandate is to turn as many Canadians as possible on to their history, and to convince them that our stories are as interesting, entertaining and engaging as any other nation’s. This mandate has changed immensely over the years. In 1920, the magazine began as an in-house newsletter for the Hudson’s Bay Company. As years passed and the fur trade died, the magazine became more of a nostalgia magazine for the “days of yore” on the trap lines, telling stories of the Far North. By the in the 1980s, it had changed focus again, becoming increasingly a “history magazine.” And in 2010, we changed the name to reflect our current focus, going from “The Beaver” to “Canada’s History.”

NMAF: At last year’s National Magazine Awards Canada’s History won Gold in the category Words & Pictures, for “On Thin Ice,” an illustrated memoir of the 1972 Summit Series by Terry Mosher (a.k.a. Aislin), who covered the iconic event as a young political cartoonist. As an editor, what attracted you to this story? And what was the significance for you to have it win a National Magazine Award?

Mark: The ’72 Summit Series is a touchstone moment in our collective cultural history. This Cold War moment is one of a handful of “where were you when” turning points for a generation of Canadians. When I learned that Terry Mosher had travelled to Russia to cover the event as a cartoonist, I knew that we needed to share his story with our wider audience of history lovers.

I asked Terry to colourize the original cartoons he produced in 1972, and share the behind the scenes tales that inspired them. After viewing them, I realized that one cartoon was missing from the story – an image of Paul Henderson scoring the winning goal. Terry’s final cartoon, with Paul Henderson memorialized on a Canadian version of Mount Rushmore, was perfect.

On_Thin_Ice_39

The Canada’s History team was collectively thrilled to work with Terry’s fantastic art, and to share his story with Canadians. For the package to win a National Magazine Award was just icing on the cake — an exciting endorsement from our peers that we received with gratitude, and that we dedicate to everyone with a passion for the past.

NMAF: You recently launched a micro-site called Destinations. How did this project come about, and what do you hope to achieve? 

Mark: While Canada’s History is our flagship magazine, our History Society is engaged in myriad programs. Canada’s History Society is a small Winnipeg-based non-profit that also produces a kid’s history magazine, and runs a host of awards and educational programs for students, teachers and community groups.

Our Destinations site is the latest attempt to reach a new audience of history lovers, in this case, history lovers who combine this passion with travel. Our hope is to work with museums, archives, and tourist sites to help them share their stories with a wider audience. It’s all part of our multipronged approach to encouraging and strengthening interest in our collective past.

NMAF: 2014 figures to be a big year for Canada’s History, with the hundredth anniversary of the start of World War I on the minds of many Canadians. What do you think is the significance of this milestone for Canada, and can you tell us a bit about how the magazine will be covering the anniversary?

Mark: The start of WWI is certainly a huge part of our publishing plans. Our key publication will be a coffee-table book on the subject, titled Canada’s Great War Album. It will be published by HarperCollins Canada, and features essays on all aspects of the war by the country’s top historians and writers, along with photos and artifacts relating to the war that have been sent to us by our readers.

Our goal is to commemorate the courageous men, women and children who lived, loved, fought, served and sacrificed during that difficult time. It will be available for sale in the fall of 2014. On the magazine side, we are also working on a special package of articles that will examine not only WWI, but also WWII, which will mark the 75th anniversary of its start in September 2014. It’s an exciting time to be publishing history, and we look forward to bringing Canadians many more great articles and publications in the months and years to come.

Mark Reid is the editor-in-chief of Canada’s History magazine, published by the History Society in Winnipeg, which also publishes Kayak: Canada’s History Magazine for Kids. Follow them on Twitter @CanadasHistory and @MarkReidEditor.

More Off the Page interviews with NMA winners
Canada’s History in the National Magazine Awards archive
Submissions for the 37th National Magazine Awards

Images courtesy CanadasHistory.ca and National Magazine Awards Foundation.

Guide to entering Digital Content in the National Magazine Awards

For the 2013 National Magazine Awards, original content published in a magazine tablet edition or on a magazine website (companion site of a print title or an online-only magazine) is eligible in most written, visual and integrated categories. Check out the digital magazine section of our FAQ for more information.

There are also 5 categories, generously supported by the Government of Canada, which are open specifically to digital content in Canadian magazines:

TABLET MAGAZINE OF THE YEAR
Open to: Any single issue of a Canadian tablet magazine published in 2013.
Criteria: The award for Tablet Magazine of the Year will go to a single issue of a Tablet Magazine that successfully fulfills its editorial mission by representing the highest journalistic standards and effectively serving its intended audience by maximizing the possibilities afforded by the medium of tablet publishing.
Entry Fee: $150 (early-bird by Jan 10); $175 (regular by Jan 15)
Meet last year’s finalists
Last year’s winner
: Canadian House & Home
More info

MAGAZINE WEBSITE OF THE YEAR
Open to: Any Canadian online-only magazine or companion website of a print title.
Criteria: The award for Magazine Website of the Year will go to a magazine website (either a companion site or an online-only magazine) that successfully fulfills its editorial mission by representing the highest journalistic standards and effectively serving its intended audience by maximizing the possibilities afforded by the medium of web-based publishing.
Entry Fee: $150 (early-bird by Jan 10); $175 (regular by Jan 15)
Meet last year’s finalists
Last year’s winner: Hazlitt
More info

EDITORIAL PACKAGE – WEB
Open to: Any original package of related or thematic editorial content produced by a Magazine Website.
Criteria: Maximizes the potential of web-based publishing and reflects collaboration by editors and content creators. Elements may include but are not limited to web design, written content, blogs, video, photography, infographics, illustration, social media and user-generated content.
Entry Fee: $95 (early-bird by Jan 10); $120 (regular by Jan 15)
Last year’s winner: The Grid (“Are you going to eat that?“)
More info

ONLINE VIDEO
Open to: A single video produced by a Magazine Website or Tablet Magazine.
Criteria: Eligible content must have been published during 2013, be clearly relevant to the magazine’s editorial mandate, and be part of an editorial process.
Entry Fee: $95 (early-bird by Jan 10); $120 (regular by Jan 15)
Meet last year’s finalists
Last year’s winner
: Hazlitt (“Pagelicker 01: Irvine Welsh“)
More info

BLOGS
Open to: A regular series of original written content by one or more authors produced by a Magazine Website that has a recognizable unifying voice or theme.
Criteria: Eligible content must have been published during 2013, be clearly relevant to the Magazine Website’s editorial mandate, and be part of an editorial process. Entrants must submit the blog’s main URL and then up to 3 sub-URLs linking specific content for the jury’s attention. The jury will be instructed to review the provided URLs as well as navigate other areas of the site, though only written content is evaluated.
Entry Fee: $95 (early-bird by Jan 10); $120 (regular by Jan 15)
Last year’s winner
Science-ish (Maclean’s)
Read our interview with last year’s winning blogger Julia Belluz
More info

Finally, the category Magazine Website Design is open to submissions from all eligible companion sites and online-only magazines. This award goes to a magazine website with the most successful and original overall combination of visual and graphic design elements with functionality and user experience, including ease of navigation, readability of content, successful integration of audio/visual elements and a clear distinction between paid content/advertising and editorial content. More info.

The 2013 National Magazine Awards are now open for submissions at magazine-awards.com. The deadline for all entries is January 15. Enter by the early-bird deadline of January 10 and save.

The National Magazine Awards Foundation acknowledges the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Off the Page, avec Isabelle Arsenault

La série Off the Page paraîtra périodiquement dans notre blogue. Cette semaine, nous découvrons quoi de neuf avec l’illustratrice Isabelle Arsenault, lauréate de 2 Prix du magazine canadien et de 2 Prix littéraires du Gouverneur général.

FNPMC: Nous vous félicitons de gagner récemment votre deuxième Prix littéraire du Gouverneur général (illustrations, jeunesse, français). Votre livre, Jane, le renard et moi, écrit par Fanny Britt, raconte l’histoire d’Hélène, une jeune fille qui fait l’objet d’intimidation par ses condisciples, se sent inférieure et dont le seul plaisir est de lire Jane Eyre. En quoi cette histoire a-t-elle une résonance chez vous, et comment avez-vous créé l’image d’Hélène?

Isabelle : Le personnage d’Hélène est une jeune fille discrète qui se retrouve sans amies à un âge où l’appartenance à un groupe prend de l’importance.  Sans avoir été moi-même victime d’intimidation, je me suis inspirée de souvenirs de ma propre jeunesse, de scènes dont j’ai été témoin et d’impressions que ces souvenirs m’ont laissé.

J’ai décidé de représenter Hélène comme étant une fille sans style particulier, plutôt neutre et effacée à laquelle le lecteur puisse facilement s’identifier.

FNPMC : Plus tôt l’année 2013, vous avez remporté un Prix du magazine canadien, votre deuxième, pour une série d’illustrations dans Québec Science, dans le cadre d’un article intitulé « Organes recherchés ». Quel processus créatif utilisez-vous lorsque vous illustrez un article de magazine? Puisez-vous votre inspiration exclusivement du texte, ou d’autres sources?

"Organes recherchés," illustration par Isabelle Arsenault, Québec Science

“Organes recherchés,” illustration par Isabelle Arsenault, Québec Science

Isabelle Arsenault (photo: Martine Boisvert)

Isabelle Arsenault (photo: Martine Boisvert)

Isabelle : Je puise mon inspiration dans une variété de sources; livres, magazines, internet, nature, etc.  J’aime bien lire le texte à illustrer plusieurs fois afin de bien m’en imprégner, pour ensuite faire quelque chose de complètement différent comme prendre une marche, faire du ménage, une sieste, du yoga.

Ça m’aide à m’aérer l’esprit et à laisser entrer les idées.

FNPMC : De quelle façon le fait de remporter un Prix du magazine canadien, ou un Prix du Gouverneur général, comme vous l’avez fait l’année dernière pour Virginia Wolf, a-t-il contribué à l’avancement de votre carrière en illustration, ou a-t-il été une source d’inspiration pour cette carrière?

Isabelle : Les prix sont une forme de reconnaissance qu’il est toujours apprécié de recevoir.  Pour ma part, je travaille de façon plutôt solitaire et ce, particulièrement lorsque je planche sur un projet de livre.  Recevoir ce genre d’honneurs me donne l’impression d’aller dans la bonne direction et m’encourage à continuer, à me dépasser, en plus d’être une belle carte de visite.

"Une brebis egaree moi?" Finaliste pour un Prix du magazine canadien, 2009

“Une brebis égarée moi?” (L’actualité) Illustration par Isabelle Arsenault – finaliste pour un Prix du magazine canadien, 2009

Isabelle Arsenault est une illustratrice canadienne lauréate dont le travail a été publié dans Québec Science, L’actualité, Explore et d’autres magazines, ainsi que dans 10 livres. Son livre le plus récent est Once Upon a Northern Night, une méditation poétique sur l’hiver. Découvrir plus au isabellearsenault.com.

Plus Off the Page
Inscriptions pour les 2013 Prix du magazine canadien (date limite 15 janvier)

Off the Page, with The Feathertale Review editor Brett Popplewell

Off the Page is an interview series that appears regularly on the Magazine Awards blog. Today we catch up with Brett Popplewell, editor of The Feathertale Review, winner of the 2012 National Magazine Award for Best Single Issue.

NMAF: The Feathertale Review has been dubbed the “illegitimate love child of Mad Magazine and The New Yorker.” We just saw your latest issue, no. 11, double in size to 128 pages. Is this a signal to readers that the child is growing up? And if so, where is it headed?

Brett Popplewell: It’s definitely a sign that the child is growing up. Where it’s heading, I have no idea.

Truth is our entire team has grown up since our launch in 2006. We were just kids back then who felt there was an absence of high- and low-brow humour magazines in the Canadian market and thought we could be the cork to plug that hole. Lee Wilson, Feathertale’s co-founder and art director, and I wanted to create something that would feel fresh and cutting edge but that would hark back to an age when magazines leaned entirely on illustration to bring their words to life. We’re the ones who started calling our creation the “illegitimate love child of Mad Magazine and The New Yorker” because it felt like the best way to describe it.

The Feathertale Review, Issue no. 1

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 1

We really started to grow up with our fourth issue (summer 2009). I finally started writing editorials to help nail a raison-d’etre for each issue and we began interviewing interesting people (David Rakoff, Stuart McLean, Patrick deWitt, Lynn Coady, etc.) in the magazine, using those interviews to try to answer some of life’s greatest questions, like: “What does it actually mean to be funny?” All of this added a creative depth to what we were doing.

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 4

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 4

That adolescent stage carried on until our ninth issue (Spring of 2012), which was later named Best Single Issue by the National Magazine Awards Foundation.

By that point Lee and I were both working fulltime with mass-market magazines and had a much better understanding of our industry and Feathertale’s place within it. We began wanting to use Feathertale to challenge what we and others thought a magazine actually was. That’s how we came up with the idea for Feathertale 9. That issue, which looked, read and felt like it was lost in time, was modeled after 250-year-old magazines in order to show readers how far magazines had evolved and changed since their initial creation back in 1731. I think the moment we started thinking about Feathertale on such a bold scale was when it grew up and became more than just the bastard love child of Mad Magazine and The New Yorker.

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 9

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 9, winner of Best Single Issue at the 2012 National Magazine Awards

We didn’t have it in us to make Feathertale 10 as crazy an innovation as its predecessor. So we sought instead to create a “swan song” issue that resembled some of our earlier issues and served to book-end a chapter of our lives.

After Feathertale 10 we had time to reflect on what we’d accomplished and assess what we thought was working and what wasn’t. We had contemplated ending the print product and concentrating on Feathertale.com, the online companion to the Review. Our $10 cover price hadn’t been doing us any favours on newsstands and our online readership had always outstripped our printed circulation. But we still believed in producing beautiful printed products and decided to double down on that belief. That’s when we started thinking about making the Review look less like a magazine and more like a book.

From a design standpoint, this made sense. We were starting to publish some much longer stories and Lee felt the long features would read better if we changed the design. So we shrunk the page size from the 8”x10” we’d been using for the first 10 issues to 5”x8”. We then doubled the length of the book to make sure it would still pack the roughly 35,000 words we’d been publishing in our previous issues. In the end, the adjustment made good business sense as well.

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 11

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 11

Feathertale is still a magazine of course, but our current issue (and our next one for that matter) does look a lot more like a book than a mag. I don’t know how that format will serve us on newsstands. We have one of the thicker spines out there right now, and I think we’ve got some pretty appealing covers but we don’t take up nearly as much space on the magazine rack. That said, our subscribers seem to be enjoying the new forma, which is encouraging. It’s also substantially cheaper for us to print the smaller layout and from what we’ve seen at festivals, people are more inclined to pay $10 (or even $15) for the new format. We’re under no pretense of being the first to come out at this size, but so far it makes sense for us.

NMAF: In addition to winning the National Magazine Award for Best Single Issue (for issue no. 9), Feathertale has also won NMAs for Humour and for Best Magazine Cover; remarkable achievements for any magazine, no less a young literary one. What impact have achievements like these made on Feathertale and its writers and artists?

Brett: The accolades have certainly helped us stay motivated, but this has never been a vanity project. Our first win for Best Magazine Cover of 2010 came as a shock, both to us and I think to others in our industry. That cover was really special to us. It was illustrated by a young artist in Oshawa named Dani Crosby. She had just graduated from Sheridan and didn’t have a huge portfolio when we handed her our magazine and told her to do as she pleased with it. There aren’t many magazines that will hand over that kind of opportunity to such a young and relatively inexperienced artist. When we won best cover, we were really just humbled and honoured to be recognized by our peers.

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 6, winner of Best Magazine Cover, 2010 National Magazine Awards

The Feathertale Review, issue no. 6, winner of Best Magazine Cover, 2010 National Magazine Awards

After our first NMA a lot of illustrators and writers who hadn’t really been looking at us started submitting work our way. It definitely helped us grow and added some more established voices to our ever-expanding list of contributors. I guess you could say that award helped us beef up subsequent issues, including Feathertale 9, which won Gold for Best Single Issue last year. I was surprised when we were nominated for that award as well and I was ecstatic when we won. I think what I’m most proud of about that issue is that we pulled it all together on a $7,000 budget. I can’t really explain how it feels to have published and edited a magazine on that kind of budget and then see it nominated alongside magazines that are easily 100 times our size.

Feathertale was probably the smallest magazine nominated for any awards last year, so to win one of the evening’s most prestigious was an unexpected honour, something Cathal Kelly (one of our frequent contributors) touched on when he tweeted that watching Feathertale win that NMA was, financially speaking, “like your home movies winning an Oscar.”

There were 37 contributors in that issue and each of them was integral to its success. I can’t speak for any of them, but I can say that I am extremely proud to have worked with each of them on that issue. I’m equally as proud of Cathal for picking up silver in the Humour category last year. We’ve always said we’re a humour magazine, and Cathal’s award and work helped validate that claim. He’s probably the most naturally gifted writer I’ve had the privilege to work with.

"Feathertale Man rewrites history..." Silver, Humour, 2012 National Magazine Awards

“Feathertale Man rewrites history…” Silver, Humour, 2012 National Magazine Awards

NMAF: You’ve spoken elsewhere about the early success story of Feathertale, where start-up funds from a successful anti-bullying comic-book venture seeded the start of the magazine, and support from Canadian arts funding has helped you grow. What lessons have you learned about publishing a literary magazine in Canada that might benefit other publishers, writers and artists out there?

Brett: The biggest lesson I’ve learned is you have to believe in the value of what you’re doing because you won’t necessarily see any benefit from your labours in your bank account. Canada is such a small market that it’s very hard to make a profit with this type of venture. Financially, Feathertale is subsidized by grant money and sales of Lee’s and my anti-bullying comic books. But aside from that, this whole thing survives on the passion of its creators. That passion comes and goes. There are times when each of us have wanted to run away from Feathertale but the longer we spend working on the project the more we realize that it’s like a child that deserves a shot at growing up and becoming a fully functioning adult. It has definitely grown up and matured, but it’s still not ready to feed itself or change its own diapers.

Publishing, especially in the 21st century, is a very fickle industry. Lee and I wandered into it without any real experience. We had some spectacular success early on with our anti-bullying comic books and have no regrets at having used that success to launch The Feathertale Review. We are fortunate to now have support from both the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council. I think it’s important for every Canadian to understand that if the Arts councils ever pulled out of funding literary journals in this country the entire industry would likely die, or at least cease to print.

NMAF: Who is D’Artagnan, really?

Brett: He’s the real brains behind this operation. The one who makes all this possible.

Seriously though, he’s the blue monkey who appears on all things Feathertale. We used to think of him as our Alfred E. Newman or Eustace Tilley, but he’s become more than that. He’s our face in this world. What’s his story? Why is he blue? We’ve been asking ourselves those questions for a long time now but still haven’t figured it out.

Brett Popplewell is the editor of The Feathertale Review, as well as a National Magazine Award-winning writer — he won Gold in the category Sports & Recreation at the 2011 National Magazine Awards for “The Team that Disappeared” (Sportsnet). Follow him on Twitter @b_popps.

Images courtesy Feathertale.com and National Magazine Awards Foundation.

Submissions are now being accepted for the 2013 National Magazine Awards. Deadline for entries: January 15.

Off the Page, with J.B. MacKinnon

Off the Page appears regularly on the Magazine Awards blog. Today we catch up with writer J.B. MacKinnon, winner of 11 National Magazine Awards and author of The Once and Future World (Random House Canada).

NMAF: In an essay titled “A 10 Percent World” (The Walrus, September 2010), you argued that humanity’s vision of an idyllic past is myopic; that in seeking to temper the impact that we have on our environment, our purpose “is not to demand some return to a pre-human Eden, but rather to expand our options”; that “our sense of what is possible sets limits on our dreams.” What did you mean by expanding our options beyond the limits?

J.B. MacKinnon (photo by A. Smith)

J.B.: “A 10 Percent World” looks at the natural world of the historical past—a much richer and more abundant state of nature than we know today. We’ve largely forgotten this more plentiful world, and that limits our sense of the possible.

Yes, it’s depressing to find out that grizzly bears used to live on the Canadian Prairies and they don’t any more, or that Vancouver waters were home to a year-round population of humpback whales that were all slaughtered by 1908. But if we aren’t aware of these facts, then the absence of the bears and the whales seems normal. When we do become aware of them, we’re able to set a higher bar for our vision of what nature can be.

NMAF: That essay won a National Magazine Award in 2011. What impact did the magazine publication and the award have on your decision to pursue a book project, resulting in your recently published The Once and Future World

J.B.: In this case, a book idea became a magazine story. In 2011, I was already thinking about The Once and Future World, but I needed to explore whether it had the potential I thought it did.

“A 10 Percent World” was that initial foray into the depths. The story had an impact on readers, and when it also won a magazine award I was able to move forward on the book with a lot more confidence.

NMAF: You’ve been a professional writer for more than a decade, with 11 National Magazine Awards (and 31 nominations). What role do Canadian magazines play in your career, and what significance do you put on winning awards?

J.B.: I became a writer during the largely overlooked great recession of the early 1990s, and the limited opportunities of that time made a deep impression on me. Fortunately, a few Canadian editors took a chance on my work, and I’ve been able to build from there. But I’m always trying to sharpen my teeth—to push toward deeper themes or better writing. It doesn’t always work, and I appreciate that Canadian magazines are still giving me chances. They don’t always expect me to show up with all my t’s crossed and i’s already dotted.

Awards are one way to measure whether or not what I’m doing on the page is working—the awards themselves matter less to me than the nominations. Consistent nominations tell me that I’m continuing to do work that is recognizably among the best in the country. Actually taking home a gold or silver is a much less predictable matter. Of course, when it happens, well… it never gets old, let’s say that.

Read "A 10 Percent World" (Gold, Essays, 2010)

Read “A 10 Percent World” (The Walrus, Gold, Essays, 2010)

Read "Becoming an Optimist" (Gold, Science, Technology & Environment, 2008)

Read “Becoming an Optimist” (Explore, Gold, Science, Technology & Environment, 2008)

J.B. MacKinnon is the award-winning author of The Once and Future World, The 100-Mile Diet and Dead Man in Paradise. His writing has appeared in great Canadian magazines including Explore, The Walrus, This Magazine and more. He was the writer for the documentary Bear 71, which explores the intersection of the wired and wild worlds through the true story of a mother grizzly bear. Discover more at jbmackinnon.com

More Off the Page
J.B. MacKinnon in the NMA Archive

Mag of the Year Corporate Knights prints on wheat straw

Canada’s reigning Magazine of the Year Corporate Knights is not resting on its laurels. According to a story in Masthead Online, the magazine’s latest issue is printed on 60% wheat straw “paper,” which its editor Tyler Hamilton says may be a more sustainable product to meet printing needs in the future.

The latest issue of the magazine features American actor and entrepreneur Woody Harrelson, one of the founders of Manitoba-based Prairie Paper Ventures, which produces the wheat straw stock.

Read the story over at Masthead Online.

Related post:
Get to know Corporate Knights, Canada’s Magazine of the Year

Off the Page, with journalist and blogger Julia Belluz

Off the Page appears regularly on the Magazine Awards blog. Today we catch up with Julia Belluz, whose blog–Science-ish–published by Maclean’s, won gold in the inaugural National Magazine Award for Best Blog earlier this year.

NMAF: Tell us a bit about Science-ish, what you consider its publishing niche to be, and who your readers are.

Julia Belluz (Photo: Jessica Darmanin)

Julia: Coffee is good for your health! Coffee is bad for your health! Vitamin D will save your life! Vitamin D will kill you quicker! I created Science-ish in response to bewildering and contradictory claims like these that float around in the popular discourse.

This confusion doesn’t end with individual health choices. Politicians frequently make assertions about health that aren’t necessarily informed by evidence, as do journalists, celebrities, and anyone who thinks they can get away with it.

So the blog is a sane place where readers can learn about the actual science behind the headlines. My readers tend to be doctors, nurses, students, policy wonks, researchers, and anyone who is concerned about health and science.

NMAF: What makes an online media outlet such as Science-ish not only trustworthy but indispensable in a news world where there exists so much information and content?

Julia: As a health reporter, I see a great deal of pseudoscience-based journalism in my field, which does nothing to elevate the discourse about science and instead confounds people. To be sure, science is far from perfect. There are a lot of systemic problems with science—the limitations of peer review, the perverting influence of industry, etc.—but I think the act of going back to primary sources and scientific evidence and seeing if there’s something to glean is a worthwhile exercise.

I want to say that every blog entry is balanced, but I don’t think that’s a good word because I’m always taking a stand after reading and interviewing a lot and thinking about the arguments and counter-arguments that I have encountered. I hope that sets Science-ish apart and resonates with readers.

NMAF: What do you think is the significance of having Science-ish win a National Magazine Award, not only for you as a health and science journalist, but also for the medium of online magazine publishing?

Julia: It’s a great honour to be recognized by peers who work across subjects and venues in journalism. It seems to be increasingly true that readers can expect good writing and reporting in many places—blogs, web pages, etc.—and it’s wonderful that the NMA recognizes that with its new online awards categories.

NMAF: You’re currently a Knight Science Journalism Fellow at MIT. Can you tell us a bit about the program and what you’re working on there?

Julia: The fellowship was designed to be a cultural exchange where journalists could learn more about science, studying alongside future researchers and scientists at MIT, while scientists could learn from visiting journalists. Right now, I’m learning about how science is made, and how it’s applied (or not) in public policy and decision-making. I’m also looking at the forces that shape what science gets done (or not). I hope this will inform my understanding of the interplay between research, policy, and practice, which is very important at a time when we’ve never generated more research, yet in many cases, we’re failing to apply or capitalize on that knowledge.

Julia Belluz is a three-time National Magazine Award-winning journalist. Her profile of the writer Ian Brown, published in the Ryerson Review of Journalism, won her the NMA for Best Student Writer in 2007 and also won a Silver in the profiles category. Science-ish is a joint project of Maclean’s, the Medical Post and the McMaster Health Forum. Follow Julia on Twitter @juliaoftoronto.

Who will win Best Magazine Blog of 2013? Submissions open next week for the 37th annual National Magazine Awards. Deadline: January 15, 2014.

More:
Off the Page
National Magazine Awards archive
Read more about the NMA Blogs category

Award-winning online magazine Hazlitt moves into print

The most decorated online magazine at this year’s National Magazine Awards is publishing a print product. Hazlitt, winner of 3 Gold National Magazine Awards–including the prestigious Magazine Website of the Year–at the 2012 NMA gala this past June, announced this week that it is launching a print edition.

Hazlitt No. 1 (Winter 2014) will be on magazine racks this month and, completing a full circle, will also have an electronic version. According to the publisher, Random House Canada, Hazlitt No. 1 collects some of the greatest hits and seminal tracks previously published on the website alongside newly commissioned work.

Launched as an online magazine in August 2012, Hazlitt won the National Magazine Awards for Best Magazine Website Design and Best Online Video, in addition to Magazine Website of the Year, at the 36th annual NMA gala this past June, its first year of eligibility.

The new print title features work by National Magazine Award winners and nominees Lynn Crosbie, Michael Winter, Billie Livingston, Sarah Nicole Prickett, Alexandra Molotkow and more.

Read Hazlitt’s press release.

More:
Meet the Finalists for Magazine Website of the Year
Meet the Finalists for Best Online Video

Off the Page, with Sierra Skye Gemma

Off the Page appears regularly on the Magazine Awards blog. Today we catch up with Sierra Skye Gemma, winner of the 2012 National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Writer.

[This post has been updated to include the new deadline for the Prism International Creative Non-fiction contest deadline: Dec 5.]

NMAF: Earlier this year you won the National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Writer for a story called “The Wrong Way” (The New Quarterly), a personal essay and critical meditation on the stages of grief. Tell us a bit about how you developed this story and why you decided to submit it in the annual non-fiction writing competition from TNQ?

Sierra Skye Gemma (Photo: Nadya Kwandibens)

Sierra Skye Gemma (Photo: Nadya Kwandibens)

Sierra: The Wrong Way came out of an assignment in a Creative Non-fiction course with Andreas Schroeder. I had never written a personal essay before and when I started I wasn’t even sure what I wanted to say. Not exactly, anyway. I looked up Kübler-Ross’s Five Stages of Grief because I thought it would explain my experiences. I thought I could structure my essay according to the stages, but I realized that Kübler-Ross’s theory didn’t apply to my life at all. My essay then developed as a sort of antagonistic call-and-response with conventional grief theories.

I sat and wrote it in two sittings, straight through from beginning to end. I didn’t move things around after that and I barely edited it. That said, I had bits and pieces of it already written. Little vignettes that I hadn’t known what to do with before, like the story of buying my son the fish and aquatic frog. I had also taken extensive notes when my sister died and I wrote down lots of dialogue. Maybe that sounds weird; maybe not, if you’re a writer. But what do you do with a short “scene” between siblings that, when read on its own, seems to make light of the death of another sibling? Well, I guess you build an elaborate home in which it can live. The Wrong Way was that home for many of my disjointed experiences with grief.

I submitted the essay to The New Quarterly’s Edna Staebler Personal Essay Contest because Andreas Schroeder told me to submit it to a contest (and not through the slush pile of regular submissions); he thought the essay was good enough to win. The New Quarterly’s personal essay contest seemed like the obvious choice. The lesson here? Always listen to Andreas Schroeder.

Click to read "The Wrong Way" by Sierra Skye Gemma

Click to read “The Wrong Way” by Sierra Skye Gemma

NMAF: What was the significance for you as a young writer winning that contest and then the National Magazine Award?

Sierra: Winning both the contest and the NMA gave me confidence in my writing, which I never really had before. Winning the NMA also got my work noticed. After I won Best New Magazine Writer, the essay was selected to appear in the Best Canadian Essays 2013 anthology, alongside some very successful writers. It is an amazing honour that I feel would not have happened without the National Magazine Awards.

NMAF: As a writer and also an editor of PRISM International, a literary magazine published by the Creative Writing Program at UBC, you are in a good position to survey the landscape of Canadian literary arts. What are the challenges and rewards of devoting yourself to this industry?

Sierra: I think the greatest challenge to being an editor of a literary magazine (or a writer for that matter) is money. There is not a lot of money in literary magazines. Small lit mags live and die by the decisions of the Canada Council for the Arts and the various provincial Arts Councils. They live and die by the seemingly small financial decisions of their staff. They live and die by their contest entries and subscriptions and by the ebb and flow of their donations. Editing and managing a literary magazine is not a career for the lazy or the extravagant. It takes a lot of careful, cautious, and sometimes tedious work to keep a literary magazine alive.

That said, it is so emotionally rewarding.  I have been a reader for the past two Creative Non-fiction Contests at PRISM and I will be a reader again this year. The emotional rollercoaster that this work has taken me on is intense. You feel the author’s highs and lows. I’ve cried and I’ve laughed until I’ve been in tears.

Although I’ve also read for other contests and other magazines, it is PRISM’s Non-fiction Contest that really makes it worth it for me because the stories are real and they matter. They matter to the author, who is risking so much to share; to the readers with whom the stories will resonate; to the editors, who have the responsibility for creating the long list and the short list; and to the contest judge who has to make the toughest decisions.

Our Creative Non-fiction Contest deadline is coming up on November 28th [Update: December 5] and I can’t wait to start reading again!

NMAF: What are your immediate goals as a writer, and what are you working on these days?

Sierra: This summer I received a grant from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada to perform research for a novel set in 1950’s California. I spent three months in northern California—taking notes, visiting museums and farms, interviewing seniors and experts, and exploring the countryside—so my research is nearly completed.

I’ve been meaning to finish my outline and start writing, but I’ve been a little distracted by another project that I have been working on for over a year: a humorous and irreverent parenting book that I’m co-writing with blogger Emily Wight. We have completed our non-fiction book proposal and one sample chapter, but I’d like to get a few more chapters done before I launch into the novel.

Sierra Skye Gemma is an award-winning writer and journalist working towards an MFA in Creative Writing at the University of British Columbia. Aside from the National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Writer, this year Sierra was also honoured with the first-place award in creative non-fiction in Rhubarb’s Taboo Literary Contest, a long-list nod in House of Anansi’s Broken Social Scene Story Contest, and a BC Arts Council scholarship. She is an executive editor of PRISM international, western Canada’s oldest literary magazine. Her work has been published in The New Quarterly, The Vancouver Sun, Plenitude, and elsewhere. Follow her on Twitter @SierraGemma.

More:
The National Magazine Award for Best New Magazine Writer
Meet the finalists for Best New Magazine Writer
A Writer’s Guide to Canadian Literary Magazines
Your Guide to Fall 2013 Canadian Magazine Writing Contests
More Off the Page interviews

New exhibit from NMA-winning photographer Mark Peckmezian

A new solo exhibition by National Magazine Award-winning photographer Mark Peckmezian is set to open on Friday, November 22 at the O’Born Contemporary gallery in Toronto.

The Canadian photographer, now based in New York, won the Gold National Magazine Award last year in Portrait Photography, for “Never Left Art School” (a series with Douglas Coupland) in Montecristo magazine. He was previously a finalist for the Best New Visual Creator award in 2010, for “A Man Called Cope” (Report on Business).

The exhibition, “Pictures,” is on display until December 21.

From the O’Born Contemporary site: Working within portraiture and documentary photography, Peckmezian attempts to leverage the analog-digital divide, producing work that draws into relief the enduring value of analog processes in our new digital-dominated photographic landscape. He recently completed his BFA in Photography from Ryerson University in Toronto, and is represented for commercial and editorial work by Stash. His photographs have been published in Prefix Photo, on the cover of Report on Business and Function, and have been selected for inclusion in Flash Forward, touring internationally.

More: Mark Peckmezian in the NMA Archive

Going for Gold: How to win a National Magazine Award

At last June’s MagNet magazines conference in Toronto, a golden panel of industry experts gathered to present a session called “Going for Gold: How to Create Award-Winning Content,” moderated by Deborah Rosser, president of Rosser & Associates.

The panellists were:

  • Carole Beaulieu, publisher and editor-in-chief of L’actualité, winner of more than 50 National Magazine Awards since she became EIC in 1998;
  • Sarah Fulford, editor-in-chief of Toronto Life, the most-nominated magazine at last year’s NMAs and former winner of Magazine of the Year (2007);
  • David Hayes, freelance writer (nominated for 14 NMAs during his career, winning a gold and a silver award) and member of the board of directors of the National Magazine Awards Foundation (NMAF);
  • Domenic Macri, art director at Report on Business and winner of 6 NMAs for his design and creative direction;
  • Patrick Walsh, editor-in-chief and brand manager of Outdoor Canada, winner of 21 National Magazine Awards since 1987, and former president of the NMAF.

Risk and Reward: The moderator began by asking each of the panellists to present the story of a challenging piece that won a National Magazine Award, and what lessons they took from the experience.

2008_torontolife2Sarah Fulford spoke about how breaking the rules helped Toronto Life to a surprise NMA win for best magazine cover of 2008. Sarah said she and her then art director Jessica Rose, whom she hired with this specific challenge in mind, took big risks on a cover about gun violence in Toronto, as they bucked the conventions for cover design with small cover lines and other elements reflecting thinking outside the box. The issue sold well on the newsstand and also impressed the NMA judges that year, as they gave it a Gold.

Domenic Macri spoke in a similar vein about a magazine cover that won Gold the following year, 2009, at the NMAs. The Julie Dickson cover presented a challenge because the editors had agreed not to put her portrait on the magazine cover. Domenic showed the audience several of his drafts and mockups that he went through on his way to finally developing the final cover, saying that what he learned from the experience was although there are certain elements required of a good cover, “you don’t have to take the same approach all the time. I think we won the award because we came up with new directions, and because of the words.”

David Hayes mentioned an episode from 1990 when a feature story he’d written for Toronto Life wasn’t entered for an NMA that year, and after talking with his editor, who said he wasn’t able to enter the piece that year due to budget constraints, he learned that he could enter the NMAs himself. Several years later he took that experience to heart when he again discovered that an editor wouldn’t enter his story, so he entered it himself and it ended up winning Gold. “You never know what the jury will decide,” he reminded the audience, “so as a writer if you are proud of your work you should enter it.”

Patrick Walsh described the story of a controversial article he commissioned about the death of a hunter in Newfoundland, called “Another Fine Day Afield.” As an editor he felt that the story hadn’t been covered well in other media, and though it would be a legal, financial and editorial challenge to pursue the story for Outdoor Canada, he decided to take the risk. The risk paid off when the magazine story he published was picked up by CBC’s The Fifth Estate and NBC’s Inside Edition, and his writer Charles Wilkins won a Gold National Magazine Award in Sports & Recreation.

Carole Beaulieu also touted the benefits of taking risks and believing in the work you produce. She talked about a piece from last year she commissioned from a writer about Pauline Marois. Although Quebec news had been saturated with stories about the premier, Carole felt there was room for more if they could find the right angle and give it the right depth. She sent her writer to spend time with Mdm Marois at her hairdresser’s, achieving a kind of intimate portrait not yet seen, and L’actualité created a newsprint insert–what it is now calling a “mini-book” and making a semi-regular feature for the magazine–to accommodate the 16-page story. And at this year’s NMAs, “L’éttoffe d’un premier ministre,” by journalist Noémi Mercier, won Gold in Profiles.

Quote-Unquote: On the significance of winning a National Magazine Award and why we strive for award-winning content.

Sarah: “An award is useful for communicating to our stakeholders that we are successful. It adds momentum to what we do every day at the magazine… We create content to satisfy our readers, not to win awards. But it is our creators who get the awards and the cash prize, and for an editor, that’s an honour.”

David: “As writers, what we have is our reputation, and what we create should stand on its own. Awards are a feather in your cap, not the cap itself.”

Patrick: “We won because the story was beautifully written, because it was longform [5000 words]… We also took risks and winning the award was a measure of that.”

Carole: “I think we should always believe in what we do. Successful magazine stories have that ‘wow’ factor, and with everything we do we try to achieve that. You know that story matters, that content matters. If you believe you achieved success then you should enter, because then you’ll know if your peers [the jury] agree; that it made them say, ‘wow.’”

The Bottom Line: The moderator asked each panellist to distill one piece of advice for winning a National Magazine Award.

Domenic: Strive for strong collaboration between editorial and art in creating your content. Success is a product of a strong team.

Carole: Don’t take things too seriously. Trust your instincts and never give up on a great story.

Sarah: The most successful pieces are the ones where the creators were passionate and took risks.

Patrick: Be strategic, because the more you enter the more you are likely to win. If your aim is to win awards then enter as much as you can.

David: Advice to writers: write well. And advice to editors: hire writers who write well.

In Summary: Accept challenges, take risks, think differently, be passionate, find (or be) the best creator, work together, never give up on a good story, believe in your work and enter as much as you can. That, and always strive for the ‘wow’ factor! 

On behalf of the Canadian magazine industry, thank you to the panellists for sharing your wisdom.

Related posts:
Off the Page, with Patrick Walsh
National Magazine Award-winning Covers, 2007-2010
Winners of the 36th National Magazine Awards

More:
Award-winning work in the National Magazine Awards archive
National Magazine Awards digital Gold Book (free)

Stephen Trumper on his path to journalism

Stephen Trumper (Photo by Nigel Dickson)

Stephen Trumper (Photo by Nigel Dickson)

On June 7 the National Magazine Awards Foundation was proud to honour Stephen Trumper with the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement. In his acceptance speech that evening Mr. Trumper touched on the challenges he faced as a person living with disability, including those related to breaking into journalism.

An excerpt of his address has been published as “Lost and Found: How a Small Group of War Vets Helped Me Find a Brighter Future” on the website of abilities.ca.

Memorably, he concluded:

[W]hat every person with a disability looking to build a career needs are allies to help shine a light on the uncertain path ahead, illuminating the way—as my war vets did—aiding me in my quest to, as Dr. Keith concluded, create a future that rested on working with my brain. That turned out to be editing and writing, a profession full of intricacies, settings and timing: elements that also happen to be the concerns of a good watchmaker.

Read the entire text of Mr. Trumper’s article.

Related post:
Stephen Trumper wins NMAF Outstanding Achievement Award

The 36th National Magazine Awards Gold Book

Make your summer reading the National Magazine Awards digital Gold Book. More than forty magazine stories and visual spreads representing the Gold winners from the 36th annual National Magazine Awards, available FREE for your computer or mobile device.

Including National Magazine Award-winning work by these Canadian literary and visual artists:

Caroline Adderson, Dave Cameron, Karen Connelly, Craig Davidson, Sierra Skye Gemma, Jessica Johnson, Tom Jokinen, Peter Ash Lee, Angus Rowe MacPherson, Greg McArthur, Leah McLaren, Conor Mihell, Jonathan Montpetit, Alison Motluk, Mark Peckmezian, Graeme Smith, Emma Teitel, Chris Turner, Jeff Warren, Sam Weber and more!

With stories from Canada’s best magazines, including Adbusters, Avenue, Azure, Canada’s History, Canadian Notes & Queries, Eighteen Bridges, Explore, Geist, Maclean’s, Maisonneuve, Reader’s Digest, Report on Business, Sportsnet, The Feathertale Review, The Grid, The New Quarterly, The Walrus, Toronto Life and more!

Congratulations to all of this year’s National Magazine Award winners, and happy summer reading to all!

Canada’s Best Magazine Covers of 2012

At the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala last week, the Gold Award for Best Magazine Cover went to Adbusters, for the cover of their 100th issue, entitled “Are We Happy Yet?”

"Are We Happy Yet?" - Adbusters, Art Direction by Will Brown and Pedro Inoue

“Are We Happy Yet?” – Adbusters, Art Direction by Will Brown and Pedro Inoue

Why the judges picked this cover: “It resonated loudly and immediately on all counts, with its tight connection between the striking cover image and the solitary cover line. An instant classic… [it] challenges one of the primary goals of advertising–to stimulate desires–and implicitly answers its own question. At once strong, direct, incisive, compelling and complete: a brilliant magazine cover.”

The Silver award for Magazine Covers went to Maisonneuve.

"Issue 45" - Maisonneuve, Art Direction by Anna Minzhulina

“Issue 45″ – Maisonneuve, Art Direction by Anna Minzhulina

Congratulations to all the winners of the 36th National Magazine Awards.

Related post:
Meet the NMA Finalists for Magazine Covers

Get to know Corporate Knights: Canada’s Magazine of the Year

The coveted award for Magazine of the Year is the most prestigious award bestowed upon a Canadian magazine. At this year’s National Magazine Awards, the winner of Magazine of the Year was Corporate Knights.

Known as the magazine for clean capitalism, Corporate Knights is published 4 times per year by Corporate Knights Inc. It is published as a quarterly insert in the Globe and Mail and Washington Post. As one of the world’s largest circulation (125K+) magazines focused on the intersection of business and society, CK is the most prominent brand in the clean capitalism media space.

Founded in 2002, Corporate Knights tirelessly works to shine a light on sustainable businesses and government practices through a mix of news, analysis, commentary, features and original research. Known for their much-anticipated rankings that measure the sustainability performance of various institutions, places and investment funds, the magazine also walked the talk. Following the same environment and social standards it celebrates, it became the first business magazine to become a Certified-B Corporation.  After the arrival of a new editor in chief and designer/senior art director, 2012 saw some more big changes and the magazine’s look and feel was revitalized. Over the year, Corporate Knights attracted top-notch freelancers and illustration talent as well as launched a new digital magazine app, enabling them to build their global subscriber base.

Discover more at corporateknights.com. And congratulations to this year’s Magazine of the Year!

Announcing the winners of the 36th National Magazine Awards!

Tonight the National Magazine Awards Foundation (NMAF) presented the winners of the 36th annual National Magazine Awards at a gala this evening in Toronto at The Carlu, presented by CDS Global, and hosted by Canadian actor Zaib Shaikh. Gold, Silver and Honourable Mention awards were presented in 47 categories, after the NMAF’s 250 volunteer judges evaluated 2000 submissions from nearly 200 Canadian consumer magazines.

[Version française]
[Complete list of winners PDF]
[36th NMA Gold Book]

Magazine of the Year

The coveted award for Magazine of the Year went to Corporate Knights. Honourable Mention for Magazine of the Year was awarded to Cottage Life, UPPERCASE and Urbania.

The award for Tablet Magazine of the Year went to Canadian House & Home for their “Colour Issue” from March 2012.

The award for Magazine Website of the Year went to Hazlitt, the online literary magazine published by Random House Canada.

Renowned Canadian editor, teacher and mentor Stephen Trumper was presented with the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement.

The winner of the award for Best New Magazine Writer was Sierra Skye Gemma, for her story “The Wrong Way” published in The New Quarterly.

Top Winning Magazines at the 36th National Magazine Awards:

Magazine

Gold

Silver

HM

L’actualité

6

0

18

The Grid

5

2

15

The Walrus

4

2

17

Hazlitt

3

0

1

Report on Business

2

5

13

Maisonneuve

2

3

9

Maclean’s

2

2

16

Corduroy

2

0

0

Toronto Life

1

4

24

Sportsnet

1

2

7

Eighteen Bridges

1

1

8

Canadian House & Home

1

1

5

Explore

1

1

4

Reader’s Digest

1

1

2

The Feathertale Review

1

1

0

Québec Science

0

2

1

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE AWARDS
The article “Building with the Brigadier” (Report on Business) by Greg McArthur and Graeme Smith—about the SNC-Lavalin investment in Libya—was the most celebrated individual article of the 36th National Magazine Awards, winning two Gold Awards, in Business and in Investigative Reporting, as well as Silver in Politics & Public Interest.

The Gold award for Best Single Issue went to The Feathertale Review (“Issue 9”), the Toronto-based independent arts magazine. The Silver went to Toronto Life (“The Loneliest Man in Toronto”).

The Gold award for the best Magazine Cover of the year went to Adbusters for their fast food satire “Are We Happy Yet?” by Will Brown and Pedro Inoue. “Issue 45” of Maisonneuve by Anna Minzhulina took the Silver award.

The new online literary magazine Hazlitt, in addition to winning Magazine Website of the Year, also took the Gold awards for Magazine Website Design and for best Online Video, the latter for the first installment of their interview series “Pagelicker 01: Irvine Welsh.”

Journalist Catherine Dubé of L’actualité won her eighth National Magazine Award with a Gold in Service: Health & Family, for “Faut-il interdire le cellulaire à l’école?” – one of six Gold awards won by L’actualité, the most of any magazine.

Journalists from L’actualité also won Gold in Politics & Public Interest (“Jason, le missionaire de Harper” by Alec Castonguay); in Service: Personal Finance & Business (“La guerre des retraites est commencée” by Annick Poitras); in Profiles (“L’étoffe d’un premier ministre?” by Noémi Mercier); in Photojournalism & Photo Essay (“Au coeur d’Attawapiskat” by Renaud Philippe); and in Spot Illustration (“Papa souffre, moi aussi” by Gérard Dubois).

The Grid led all publications with 7 total awards, including 5 Gold Awards: in Editorial Package: Web for their feature “Are You Going to Eat That?”; in Single Service Article Package for “The Grid Guide to Getting Hitched”; in How-To for “The Grid Guide to Buying a Condo”; in Creative Photography for “Truckin’ A!” by Angus Rowe MacPherson; and in Art Direction of a Single Magazine Article, for “Chef’s Guide to Toronto” by Vanessa Wyse.

Corduroy, an independent style and fashion magazine based in Toronto, won Gold for Art Direction of an Entire Issue (“Issue 10”) and in Fashion (“ten covers x ten models”), with art direction by Peter Ash Lee.

Writer Chris Turner led all individuals with four nominations and won Gold in Travel for “On Tipping in Cuba” in The Walrus. Mr. Turner has now won nine National Magazine Awards.

The Walrus won 6 total awards including 4 Gold: in addition to the Travel category, also winning Gold in Illustration (“Apocalypse Soon” by Sam Weber); in One-of-a-Kind (“What Would Tommy Douglas Think?” by Tom Jokinen); and in Society (“Fade to Light” by Dave Cameron).

In Words & Pictures the Gold award went to “On Thin Ice” in Canada’s History, by Terry Mosher (a.k.a. Aislin), Mark Reid and Michel Groleau.

Writer Alison Motluk won Gold in Health & Medicine for her story “Is Egg Donation Dangerous?” in Maisonneuve. For Ms. Motluk this is her third National Magazine Award. The Montreal quarterly’s other Gold award came in the category Best Short Feature, for “Notes from the End of the War” by Jonathan Montpetit.

In Fiction the Gold went to Alberta novelist Caroline Adderson for her short story “Ellen-Celine, Celine-Ellen” published in Canadian Notes & Queries. Former Governor General Literary Award winner Patrick deWitt won the Silver for “The Looking-Ahead Artist” in Brick.

In Poetry the Gold winner was former Governor General Literary Award winner Karen Connelly for her poem “The Speed of Rust, or, He Marries” in Geist. Sue Goyette won the Silver for her series of “Fashion” poems in Prairie Fire.

The story “Whale Rising” by Jeff Warren in Reader’s Digest was a double winner, taking Gold in Science, Technology & Environment and Silver in Essays.

Sportsnet took the Gold in Editorial Package: Print, for “Sports that can kill.” Québec Science won Silver for “50 défis pour 2050.”

Emma Teitel of Maclean’s won the Gold award in Columns. Ms. Teitel won Honourable Mention last year in the category Best New Magazine Writer.

Six of the ten finalists in the new category Blogs were from Maclean’s, with the blog “Science-ish” by Julia Belluz—a former winner of the National Magazine Award for Best Student Writer—winning Gold. Paul Wells won the Silver for “Inkless Wells.”

In Portrait Photography the Gold went to “Never Left Art School,” a series of portraits of artist Douglas Coupland by Mark Peckmezian for Montecristo.

The new French-language literary magazine Nouveau Projet won its first National Magazine Award for “Faux self mon amour” by Fanny Britt in the category Personal Journalism.

Eighteen Bridges gained ten nominations and won Gold in Humour for “The Hairs about our Secrets” by Jessica Johnson.

Toronto Life led all publications with 29 nominations, winning a Gold in Arts & Entertainment for “Something Borrowed” by Leah McLaren.

The new Globe & Mail magazine Globe Style Advisor won its first National Magazine Award, a Gold in the category Beauty for “Lady Obscura.”

Also winning Gold Awards:

Visit magazine-awards.com for the complete list of winners and to download the commemorative 36th National Magazine Awards Gold Book.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The National Magazine Awards Foundation acknowledges the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage, as well as financial support from the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario, and the Ontario Media Development Corporation. The National Magazine Awards Foundation gratefully acknowledges its suppliers and its contributors who donated gifts in kind to support the awards program. We thank them for their generosity, interest and expertise.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL MAGAZINE AWARDS FOUNDATION
The National Magazine Awards Foundation is a bilingual, not-for-profit institution whose mission is to recognize and promote excellence in the content and creation of Canadian print and digital publications through an annual program of awards and national publicity efforts. magazine-awards.com

Meet the NMA Finalists for Magazine of the Year

The most prestigious award bestowed by the National Magazine Awards Foundation is Magazine of the Year. This year our jury nominated four titles from entries across the country in both official languages. The award for Magazine of the Year goes to the magazine that in 2012 most consistently engaged, surprised and served the needs of its readers.

There’s just one more week until the biggest night in Canadian magazines — the National Magazine Awards gala is Friday June 7 at the Carlu.
[INFO & TICKETS]

Here are this year’s four nominated magazines for Magazine of the Year…

1. Corporate Knights

Founded in 2002, Corporate Knights tirelessly works to shine a light on sustainable businesses and government practices through a mix of news, analysis, commentary, features and original research. Known for their much-anticipated rankings that measure the sustainability performance of various institutions, the magazine also follows the same environmental and social standards it celebrates. In 2012 it became the first business magazine to become a Certified-B Corporation.  After the arrival of a new editor-in-chief and designer/senior art director, 2012 also saw a revitalization of the magazine’s look and feel. Over the year, Corporate Knights attracted top-notch freelancers and illustration talent as well as launched a new digital magazine app, enabling them to build their global subscriber base.

Corporate Knights is nominated for a total of 3 National Magazine Awards, including for Illustration and for Editorial Package. Discover more at corporateknights.com.

2. Cottage Life

Over the past 25 years, Cottage Life has had the chance to report on topics as diverse as cottagers themselves. In the magazine’s signature warm, light-hearted voice, it continues to inform, entertain and inspire with long-form features, profiles, integrated packages, service stories and engaging visuals and design. 2012 was no exception in realizing its mission to enhance and preserve the quality of cottage living. Both informative and fun, its 25th anniversary series was fruitful with highlights such as a commemorative essay series by renowned Canadians about beloved cottage activities and components, a feature looking into the future of cottaging (“2050: A Cottage Odyssey”), and many strong how-to and service pieces.

Cottage Life is nominated for a total of 10 National Magazine Awards, including for Best Single Issue, Words & Pictures, Single Service Article Package, How-To, Service: Health & Family, Homes & Gardens, and Art Direction of a Single Article. Discover more at cottagelife.com.

3. UPPERCASE

Now in its fourth year, UPPERCASE seeks to nurture and inspire the creative community with works sparked by design, illustration, photography and craft. Many subjects and contributors are subscribers first and the magazine works to promote the talent of its readership. Stocked in over 150 Anthropologie stores in North America, the magazine has continued to grow its subscriber base in Canada and beyond. In making a move toward theme-based issues, UPPERCASE has generated an eclectic mix of content while maintaining its sense of play and creativity, and its award-winning design continues to inspire its readers.

UPPERCASE is nominated for a total of 2 National Magazine Awards, including for Art Direction of an Entire Issue. Discover more at uppercasemagazine.com.

4. Urbania

2012 a été une année particulière pour Urbania, trimestriel produit par l’agence de création Toxa. Chaque numéro porte sur un thème particulier, tel que l’hiver, les Parisiens, les anglophones, en mettant l’accent sur les gens et leur histoire. La publication s’est étendue à de nouvelles plates-formes numériques, à la télé Web et à des événements communautaires, courtisant la fidélité de ses lecteurs de façons inspirées et novatrices. Urbania est également nominé dans la catégorie Dossiers thématiques. Découvrir plus au urbania.ca.

2012 was a special year for Urbania, the thrice-annual magazine produced by the creative agency Toxa. Each issue had a special theme—Winter, Parisians, Anglos—focusing on people and their stories, while the brand expanded to new digital platforms, web-tv and community events, engaging its readers in spirited and innovative ways. Urbania is nominated for a total of 2 National Magazine Awards, including for Editorial Package. Discover more at urbania.ca.

Congratulations to the four finalists for Magazine of the Year. The winner will be revealed at the conclusion of the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 at The Carlu in Toronto. [INFO & TICKETS]

Meet the NMA Finalists for:
Art Direction for an Entire Issue
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Best New Magazine Writer
Illustration
Magazine Covers
Online Video
Portrait Photography
Magazine Website of the Year
Best Single Issue
Tablet Magazine of the Year
Words & Pictures

And check out our Facebook page for more coverage of this year’s National Magazine Awards nominees!

Follow us on Twitter @MagAwards with the hashtag #NMA13 for all of the exciting news before, during and after next week’s gala!

Meet the NMA Finalists for Words & Pictures

The National Magazine Award for Words & Pictures goes to the best example of a magazine article whose impact lies in the successful integration of text and visuals as inseparable elements, reflecting collaboration between writers, editors, visual artists and art directors. The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed at the 36th NMA Gala on June 7.
[INFO & TICKETS]

Here are this year’s nominees…

"On Thin Ice" (Canada's History)

“On Thin Ice” (Canada’s History) – Text and illustrations by Aislin, art direction by Michel Groleau, edited by Mark Reid

"Play it Again, Sam" (Cottage Life)

“Play it Again, Sam” (Cottage Life) – Text by Jay Teitel, photography by Derek Shapton, art direction by Kim Zagar, edited by Blair Eveleigh

"Avons-nous un devoir envers eux?" (ELLE Quebec)

“Avons-nous un devoir envers eux?” (ELLE Québec) – Text by Dominique Forget, photography by Tim Flach, art direction by Nancy Pavan, edited by Louise Dugas

"For Love of Country" (enRoute)

“For Love of Country” (enRoute) – Text by Jean-François Légaré, photography by Leda & St. Jacques, art direction by Nathalie Cusson, photo editing by Julien Beaupré Ste-Marie, edited by Philippe Gohier

"5 Star Tribute" (More)

“5 Star Tribute” (More) – Text by Kim Pittaway, art direction by Faith Cochran, edited by Linda Lewis and Sarah Moore, with contributions from Shelley Frayer.

"We Built That" - Report on Business

“We Built That” (Report on Business) – Text by John Daly, photography by Cindy Blazevic, art direction by Domenic Macri, edited by John Daly

"The Six Habits of Highly Successful Art Collectors" (Report on Business)

“The Six Habits of Highly Successful Art Collectors” (Report on Business) – Text by Sara Angel, photography by Markian Lozowchuk, art direction by Domenic Macri, edited by Dave Morris and David Fielding

"Ringmasters" (The Walrus)

“Ringmasters” (The Walrus) – Text by Sean Michaels, photography by Roger LeMoyne, art direction by Brian Morgan, edited by Sasha Chapman.

"Oh, for Just One Time..." (Up Here)

“Oh, for Just One Time…” (Up Here) – Text by Margo Pfeif; photography by Lee Narraway, Eric McNair-Landry, and Sarah McNair-Landry; art direction by John Pekelsky; edited by Aaron Spitzer

Congratulations to all the nominees in Words & Pictures. The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed at the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 at The Carlu in Toronto. [INFO & TICKETS]

Meet the NMA Finalists for:
Art Direction for an Entire Issue
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Best New Magazine Writer
Illustration
Magazine Covers
Online Video
Portrait Photography
Magazine Website of the Year
Best Single Issue
Tablet Magazine of the Year

Meet the NMA Finalists for Tablet Magazine of the Year

This year for the first time the National Magazine Awards are recognizing excellence in tablet magazine publishing. The award for Tablet Magazine of the Year will go to a single issue of a tablet magazine that most successfully fulfills its editorial mandate, represents the highest journalistic standards and serves its audience by maximizing the possibilities of tablet publishing.

This award is supported by the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund. The winner will be revealed at the 36th NMA Gala on June 7.
[INFO & TICKETS]

Here are this year’s three finalists for Tablet Magazine of the Year:

Canadian House & Home (The Colour Issue, March 2012). Editor: Suzanne Dimma. Art Direction: Mandy Milks and Shanna Pollard. Contributions from: Brandie Weikle and Trevor Koebel.

What the judges said: “The tablet edition of this venerable title oozes planning and creativity and is an enhancement not just of a magazine, but a media brand. Well executed, this is way more than a print product in digital form. It’s an excellent melding of medium and message that takes full advantage of its tablet form while enriching the House and Home experience with vibrant colours, immersive options and e-commerce convenience. Bright, gorgeous, immersive, fun, integrated, detailed, thoroughly thought-out.”

Maclean’s (Canada’s Best Restaurants, September 2012). Editor: Mark Stevenson. Art Direction: Erika Oliveira and Rachel Tennenhouse. Contributions from: John Cullen, Jacob Richler, Liza Cooperman, Stacy Lee Kong, Thushjanthan Sivagurunathan, Tate Young, Brian Coleman and Jeffrey Flores.

What the judges said: “This issue from Maclean’s shows what a special interest publication can do when given the power of a tablet. Restaurant stories, food and atmosphere come alive through engaging images, video and, of course, top-notch food writing. Subdued and classy. The photography and typography really complement each other, and the recipes on every page are a smart and handy touch. It’s useful, slick, and tons of fun.”

Chez Soi (Noël 100% déco, mai 2012). Rédactrice : Solange Beaulieu. Direction artistique : Nathalie d’Amour.

Ce que les juges ont dit : “Bien pensée, intuitive, et le résultat certain d’une vision multiplates-formes réfléchie, l’édition pour tablette de Chez Soi témoigne d’une perspicacité de premier ordre. L’intégration de la vidéo dans la mise en page, et l’utilisation d’images surdimensionnées à fort impact est un concept rafraîchissant. Jusqu’aux instructions pratiques, astucieuses, qui donnent le ton et laissent présager l’expérience de lecture divertissante à venir. La visite de maisons, dans l’édition pour iPad de Chez Soi  a été une merveilleuse expérience, qui donne vie au mandat de la publication, d’une manière que n’aurait jamais pu restituer l’édition imprimée. Un produit captivant et enrichissant.”

What the judges said: “Smart, intuitive, and an obvious result of multi-platform thinking, the team at Chez Soi brought their A-game to the tablet edition. Incorporating video into layouts and big, bold images was a fresh concept. Even the how-to instructions are clever and foreshadow the immersive, entertaining experience to follow. Touring homes on Chez Soi‘s iPad edition was a wonderful experience, bringing its mandate to life in a way that print never could. An engaging and enriching product.”

Congratulations to the three finalists for Tablet Magazine of the Year. The winner will be revealed at the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 at The Carlu in Toronto. [INFO & TICKETS]

Meet the NMA Finalists for:
Art Direction for an Entire Issue
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Best New Magazine Writer
Illustration
Magazine Covers
Online Video
Portrait Photography
Magazine Website of the Year
Best Single Issue

Meet the NMA Finalists for Best Single Issue

The National Magazine Award for Best Single Issue rewards general excellence of an individual issue of a magazine in terms of quality of content and design, originality and relevance to its intended audience. As an integrated category this award celebrates the collaborative effort of editors, art directors and content creators in producing a successful magazine edition. The Gold and Silver winners in Best Single Issue will be revealed at the 36th NMA Gala on June 7. [INFO & TICKETS]

Here are this year’s nominees…

Cottage Life, June 2012. Editor: Penny Caldwell. Art Director: Kim Zagar. Including contributions from Blair Eveleigh, Martin Zibauer, Michelle Kelly, Liann Bobechko, Jackie Davis, Vicki Hornsby, Quinn Banting

Cottage Life, June 2012. Editor: Penny Caldwell. Art Director: Kim Zagar. Including contributions from Blair Eveleigh, Martin Zibauer, Michelle Kelly, Liann Bobechko, Jackie Davis, Vicki Hornsby, Quinn Banting and Cottage Life contributors.

About this issue: The third installment of Cottage Life‘s twenty-fifth anniversary series celebrated the unrivaled sensation of the Canadian lake swim in a cover story by Scotiabank Giller Prize-winning author Joseph Boyden. The magazine’s consistent service to its hungry readers continued unabated with an installment of its regular Grill Guide (to essential sides) and a how-to for DIY boathouse builders. Page after page of some of Canada’s best magazine writers, photographers and illustrators made it an especially memorable issue.

enRoute, November 2012. Editor: Ilana Weitzman. Art Director: Nathalie Cusson.

enRoute, November 2012. Editor: Ilana Weitzman. Art Director: Nathalie Cusson. Including contributions from enRoute staff and contributors.

About this issue: enRoute’s annual look at the interconnectedness of food and travel took on new shapes for its November 2012 issue. Centered primarily upon the title of “Canada’s Best New Restaurants,” readers were invited into a nation-wide search for Canada’s top-10 new restaurants. Specific emphasis was placed upon Canadian chefs and Toronto’s burgeoning food culture. A series of delectable topics were also attended to, inclusive of sea lettuce, vermouth and international dining experiences set in Tokyo, Puerto Rico and Birmingham.

LE Must, June 2012. Redactrice: Yacka Simard. Directrice artistique: Lyne Gosselin. Avec contributions par Marjolaine Jetté, Martin Lemire, Marion Renard, Maxime Canton

LE Must, juin 2012. Rédactrice: Lyne Gosselin. Directrice artistique: Yacka Simard. Avec des contributions de Marjolaine Jetté, Martin Lemire, Marion Renard, Maxime Canton.

About this issue: LE Must‘s summer guide to “Santé alimentaire” was an exaltation of all things green; an homage to herbs, a celebration of salad. The editors curated a series of healthy recipes, including desserts, bolstered by stunning photography and practical guides to cooking and eating according to the body’s needs. Plus an in-depth look at school breakfast clubs in Quebec and a nostalgic ode to the family picnic (complete with portraits of a VW microbus).

Maisonneuve, Spring 2012. Editors: Drew Nelles, Amelia Schonbek. Art Director: Anna Minzhulina. Including contributions from Maisonneuve staff and contributors.

Maisonneuve, Spring 2012. Editors: Drew Nelles, Amelia Schonbek. Art Director: Anna Minzhulina. Including contributions from Maisonneuve staff and contributors.

About this issue: Maisonneuve’s Spring 2012 issue celebrated its ten-year anniversary. The decade-old publication–and Canada’s reigning Magazine of the Year–chose to emphasize the importance of its birthday with the addition of sixteen pages and contributions from top Canadian writers. Among the latter was Tim Falconer who authored a personal reflection into the science of music as well as Paul Gettlich who delved into the Occupy Toronto movement. Commonwealth Prize winning author Demi Y. Bechard also offered a compelling memoir regarding the criminal past of his father. And in a cross-Canada tour of Nunavut, Vancouver and Montreal Maisonneuve explored the human condition.

The Feathertale Review, Issue 9, June 2012. Editor: Brett Popplewell. Art Director: Lee H. Wilson. Including contributions from Benson Lee, Sharis Shahmiryan, Corina Milic.

The Feathertale Review, Issue 9, June 2012. Editor: Brett Popplewell. Art Director: Lee H. Wilson. Including contributions from Benson Lee, Sharis Shahmiryan, Corina Milic.

About this issue: The Featherale Review’s mandate is to provide a literary voice for a new contingent of Canadian creators while also giving rise to breakout developments in the world of art.  The single issue that was Feathertale No.9 accomplished these very goals with contributions from 33 writers and artists. A regard for timelessness was maintained throughout as the content was intended to be read as if produced at any point during the past 200 years, a nod to Edward Cave, a.k.a. Sylvanus Urban, who produced the first magazine in 1731.

The Grid, May 10, 2012. Editors: Laas Turnbull, Lianne George. Art Director: Vanessa Wyse. Including contributions from The Grid staff and contributors.

The Grid, May 10, 2012. Editors: Laas Turnbull, Lianne George. Art Director: Vanessa Wyse. Including contributions from The Grid staff and contributors.

About this issue: The Grid‘s Chef’s Guide to Toronto graced the pages of its inaugural issue in 2011, and the 2012 installment once again whetted urban appetites for the latest culinary creations and foodie trends, as well as a guide to the city’s new food trucks. The indispensable weekly guide to Canada’s largest city stimulated readers with colourful graphics on every page, a hallmark of its award-winning design. Add in a dash of Edward Keenan’s widely read column, excellent reviews and handy tips for how to become a firefighter, and you have one delectable issue.

The Walrus, November 2012. Editor: John Macfarlane. Art Director: Brian Morgan. Including contributions from Kyle Carsten Wyatt, Sasha Chapman, Rachel Giese, Amy Macfarlane, Michael Lista, Nick Mount, Paul Kim, Meredith Holigroski, Pamela Capraru

The Walrus, November 2012. Editor: John Macfarlane. Art Director: Brian Morgan. Including contributions from Kyle Carsten Wyatt, Sasha Chapman, Rachel Giese, Amy Macfarlane, Michael Lista, Nick Mount, Paul Kim, Meredith Holigroski, Pamela Capraru

About this issue: The November 2012 issue of The Walrus addressed North American politics as the U.S. breached its Presidential election. Pulitzer Prize winner Chris Hedges addressed a pressing political question in his cover story that asked what happens to Canada if America fails?  Working alongside Hedges was photographer Alan Chin whose “A Metaphor for America” images drew sobering ties between Canada’s economy and America’s political climate. These governmental considerations were further paired with reviews of food truck booms, the dancing career of Peggy Bajer and the new $20 bill.

Toronto Life, May 2012. Editor: Sarah Fulford. Art Director: Christine Dewairy. Including contributions from Toronto Life staff and contributors.

Toronto Life, May 2012. Editor: Sarah Fulford. Art Director: Christine Dewairy. Including contributions from Toronto Life staff and contributors.

About this issue: Toronto Life‘s May 2012 issue remained true to the magazine’s established history of covering stories that matter most to Torontonians, this time via its profile of embattled mayor Rob Ford. Author Marci MacDonald followed Ford’s political trajectory with precision and a cold review of facts. A focus upon the city’s best in food, fashion and real estate was also maintained via its coverage of pop-up restaurants, spring apparel trends and chic loft conversions.

Congratulations to all the nominees in Best Single Issue. The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed at the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 at The Carlu in Toronto. [INFO & TICKETS]

Meet the NMA Finalists for:
Art Direction for an Entire Issue
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Best New Magazine Writer
Illustration
Magazine Covers
Online Video
Magazine Website of the Year

Meet the NMA Finalists for Magazine Website of the Year

The National Magazine Award for Magazine Website of the Year goes to the magazine companion website or online-only magazine that most successfully fulfills its editorial mission and serves the needs of its readers by maximizing the possibilities of web-based publishing. This award is supported by the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund. The winner will be revealed at the 36th NMA Gala on June 7.
[INFO & TICKETS]

Here are this year’s three finalists for Magazine Website of the Year:

hazlittmag.com (Hazlitt; editor: Chris Frey)

hazlittmag.com (Hazlitt; editor in chief: Christopher Frey)

What the judges said about hazlittmag.com
Hazlitt’s minimal design style draws you in with engaging imagery and genuine voices. The stories it publishes play to the strength of the medium both in tone and technique. There is no other publication quite like Hazlittmag.com; their confidence in their mandate is an invigorating example of what Canadian magazines can be online.

macleans.ca (Maclean's; Editor: Sue Allan)

macleans.ca (Maclean’s; web editor: Sue Allan)

What the judges said about Macleans.ca
One does not come to macleans.ca and wonder what there is to read. The site does a tremendous job presenting a deep mix of news and opinion within a distinct design that ably reflects its print sibling, but does so with a uniquely digital spin. It’s an ambitious site that delivers everything from original content, clean layout and a great user experience.

torontolife.com (Toronto Life; web editor: Andrew Wallace)

torontolife.com (Toronto Life; web editor: Andrew Wallace)

What the judges said about torontolife.com:
Torontolife.com is a tremendous example of a magazine that has extended its brand online to add new and unique value to the magazine’s strengths. Where they’ve been exceptionally successful is in showcasing the unique character of the city where many other digitally native sites have failed. Extensive, well packaged, and true to its readership.

Congratulations to the three finalists for Magazine Website of the Year. The winner will be revealed at the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 at The Carlu in Toronto. [INFO & TICKETS]

Meet the NMA Finalists for:
Art Direction for an Entire Issue
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Best New Magazine Writer
Illustration
Magazine Covers
Online Video
Portrait Photography

Meet the NMA Finalists for Portrait Photography

For this year’s National Magazine Awards the judges have selected eight finalists in the category Portrait Photography, which honours excellence in any single photograph or series of photographs of a person or persons. Gold and Silver winners will be presented at the 36th NMA Gala on June 7.
[INFO & TICKETS]

Here are this year’s nominees…

"Never Left Art School." Photography by Mark Peckmezian for Montecristo.

“Never Left Art School.” Photography by Mark Peckmezian for Montecristo.

"Art Investing." Photography by Markian Lozowchuck for Report on Business.

“Art Investing.” Photography by Markian Lozowchuck for Report on Business.

"On His Mark." Photography by Chris Muir for Sportsnet.

“On His Mark.” Photography by Chris Muir for Sportsnet.

"Sue-Ann Levy." Photography by Markian Lozowchuk for The Grid.

“Sue-Ann Levy.” Photography by Markian Lozowchuk for The Grid.

"After Midnight." Photography by Jaime Hogge for The Walrus.

“After Midnight.” Photography by Jaime Hogge for The Walrus.

"25 Most Stylish." Photography by Francisco Garcia for Toronto Life.

“25 Most Stylish.” Photography by Francisco Garcia for Toronto Life.

"Blade Runner." Photography by Carlo Ricci for Vancouver Magazine.

“Blade Runner.” Photography by Carlo Ricci for Vancouver Magazine.

"Frankly Jann." Photography by Bryan Adams for Zoomer.

“Frankly Jann.” Photography by Bryan Adams for Zoomer.

Congratulations to all the nominees in Portrait Photography. The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed at the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 at The Carlu in Toronto. [INFO & TICKETS]

Meet the NMA Finalists for:
Art Direction for an Entire Issue
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Best New Magazine Writer
Illustration
Magazine Covers
Online Video

Meet the NMA Finalists for Best Online Video

A new category for this year’s National Magazine Awards, the award for Online Video will go to the best production by a magazine website or tablet magazine. This year there are 5 finalists, and the Gold and Silver winners will be revealed at the 36th NMA gala on June 7. [INFO & TICKETS]

And the nominees are:

1. “Condo Balcony Makeover” (Canadian House & Home):

What the judges said: “The perfect example of a how-to video. The hosts are casual and comfortable in their narration/explanation of the makeover. Visuals showing before and after are used to great effect. Strong editing and camera work carry this well-paced video that doesn’t leave out details and offers solutions in under three minutes.”

2. “Les coulisses du reportage mode Icônes” (ELLE Québec)

What the judges said: “Excellent use of interviews interspersed with behind-the-scenes footage to highlight this unique fashion shoot. The editing keeps the pace moving along quickly and the interview subjects are dynamic and interesting. It’s journalism with style.”

3. “Pagelicker 01: Irvine Welsh” (Hazlitt)

What the judges said: “A video that captures a moment and holds you there through intimate camera work,  a contemplative soundtrack, and a sense of honesty fuelled by humour and one nervous-yet-together host, who draws out kernels of information a conventional interview would miss. Creative, quirky and excellent production quality.”

4. “Reboot on Life” (Ottawa Citizen Style)

What the judges said: “The pace of this short video is spot on, and the illustrator does a great job of moving the piece along to the voices of the narrators. Excellent sound quality. The overall communication is clear and well paced. Perfect length. Effective and memorable.”

5. “Toronto’s National Anthem” (The Grid)

What the judges said: “A strong example of what web video should be. Simple, clean, short, and communicates everything it needs to in under two minutes. This playful, well composed song’s apathetic tone is matched by playful visuals and packaged in a solid edit. A catchy tune that captures the spirit of the city.”

Congratulations to all the nominees in Online Video. The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed at the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 at The Carlu in Toronto. [INFO & TICKETS]

Meet the NMA Finalists for:
Art Direction for an Entire Issue
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Best New Magazine Writer
Illustration
Magazine Covers

Meet the NMA Finalists for Magazine Covers

A great magazine cover attracts the reader with alluring images and solid display; the perfect blend of editorial and design that makes the magazine such a unique and special medium. At this year’s National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 [INFO & TICKETS] one of these 10 nominees will earn the right to be called Canada’s best magazine cover:

"Are We Happy Yet?" - Adbusters, Art Direction by Will Brown and Pedro Inoue

“Are We Happy Yet?” – Adbusters, Art Direction by Will Brown and Pedro Inoue

"March/April 2012" - Azure, Art Direction by Concrete Design Communications

“March/April 2012″ – Azure, Art Direction by Concrete Design Communications

"The New Oilpatch" - Canadian Business, Art Direction by John Montgomery

“The New Oilpatch” – Canadian Business, Art Direction by John Montgomery

"The Secret Khadr File" - Maclean's, Art Direction by Stephen Gregory

“The Secret Khadr File” – Maclean’s, Art Direction by Stephen Gregory

"Issue 45" - Maisonneuve, Art Direction by Anna Minzhulina

“Issue 45″ – Maisonneuve, Art Direction by Anna Minzhulina

"Colombia" - Report on Business, Art Direction by Domenic Macri

“Colombia” – Report on Business, Art Direction by Domenic Macri

"January 12, 2012" - The Grid, Art Direction by Vanessa Wyse

“January 12, 2012″ – The Grid, Art Direction by Vanessa Wyse

"That Time We Beat the Americans" - The Walrus, Art Direction by Brian Morgan

“That Time We Beat the Americans” – The Walrus, Art Direction by Brian Morgan & Anita Kunz

"The Northwest Passage" -  Up Here, Art Direction by John Pekelsky

“The Northwest Passage” – Up Here, Art Direction by John Pekelsky

"July/August 2012" - Vancouver Magazine, Art Direction by Randall Watson

“July/August 2012″ – Vancouver Magazine, Art Direction by Randall Watson

Congratulations to all the nominees in Magazine Covers. The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed at the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 at The Carlu in Toronto. [INFO & TICKETS]

Meet the NMA Finalists for:
Art Direction for an Entire Issue
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Best New Magazine Writer
Illustration

Meet the NMA Finalists for Illustration

The National Magazine Awards Foundation proudly celebrates the artists whose masterful illustrative work enhances the context and impact of magazine stories. This year there are 8 finalists in the category Illustration. Gold and Silver awards will be presented at the 36th NMA Gala on June 7.
[INFO & TICKETS]

And the nominees are…

"Diversity Report," Illustration by Gracia Lam, Corporate Knights

“Diversity Report,” Illustration by Gracia Lam, Corporate Knights

"Marques utiles," par Benoit Tardif, Infopresse

“Marques utiles,” par Benoit Tardif, Infopresse

"La diplomatie de l'or noir," par Sébastien Thibault, L'actualité

“La diplomatie de l’or noir,” par Sébastien Thibault, L’actualité

"Organes recherchés," par Isabelle Arsenault, Québec Science

“Organes recherchés,” par Isabelle Arsenault, Québec Science

"Cool Parents," by Ethan Rilly, Taddle Creek

“Cool Parents,” by Ethan Rilly, Taddle Creek

"War Games," by Barry Blitt, The Walrus

“War Games,” by Barry Blitt, The Walrus

"Apocalypse Soon," by Sam Weber, The Walrus

“Apocalypse Soon,” by Sam Weber, The Walrus

"The Writer," by Gracia Lam, Write Magazine

“The Writer,” by Gracia Lam, Write Magazine

Congratulations to all the nominees in Illustration. The Gold and Silver winners will be revealed at the 36th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 7 at The Carlu in Toronto. [INFO & TICKETS]

Meet the NMA Finalists for:
Art Direction for an Entire Issue
Photojournalism & Photo Essay
Best New Magazine Writer

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